Discussion: LEAD 530

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Thread:W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Post:Re: W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Agreed.
I think in the rest of my classes, I will try to take more of a 1-2 posts a day approach. Very often, points that were made or questions that were posted were so interesting that I felt compelled to reply – to place a vote for its valence to me, or to submit a thank you, or to strengthen a relationship, or to simply agree or disagree.
I saw almost immediately after my post of my STOP suggestion that it was unnecessary – you should feel free to post a wide variety of content, and we can respond in turn, or not, as we choose.
Thanks for the opportunity for feedback!
John.
Thread:Thanks Everyone
Post:Re: Thanks Everyone
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks to everyone! This was a fantastic first experience with graduate education, online learning, and the topic of leadership.
John.
Thread:W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Post:Re: W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Terri says “The only suggestion I can think of is that I found the double weeks on one thread a little overwhelming, perhaps a separate thread for each part of the week that is considered a new week (this may be impossible though because of blackboard, not sure).”
I agree with this, and Blackboard can definitely be used to implement this – Tim chose to put the weeks together as part of the accelerated format, but I don’t know if the volume of our discussions is typical.
John.
Thread:W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Post:Re: W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth,
I knew I’d be alone (or part of a minority) in my dislike of the poetry. πŸ˜‰ Certainly no apology is necessary. I think in this thread there are no wrong answers.
Tim, obviously, you should be posting three to five times more of what I’ll call ‘inspirational leadership poetry’ – I’ll make sure to look at it with more of an open mind in the future.
Maybe there could even be a inspirational leadership poetry elective for the Organizational Leadership communications concentration. I see it filling up quick. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W6BQ2 – Team Conflict
Post:Re: W6BQ2 – Team Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn,
Thank you so much.
I don’t mean for it to sound as though it was a chore to get to talk with all of you by phone – the opposite is true – I specifically did not think it was a waste in any way – and I honestly enjoyed it quite a bit, and was glad that we could have a quick back and forth and have some consensus and confirmations take place in contrast to the post-and-wait methods inherent in Bb discussions or email.
I’m very glad I had the opportunity to be in that role on our team, and I’m looking forward to working with all of you again – leading a team like this, with the time, technology, and communication issues inherent in our collective situation of distance learning, is a great learning experience in leadership as well as management. I’m looking forward to working under each of you in our various group projects going forward.
John.
Thread:W6AQ5 – Quality Programs
Post:Re: W6AQ5 – Quality Programs
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Lauren – I’m really sad to be leaving these particular forums – I had a lot of fun here.
John.
Thread:W6BQ2 – Team Conflict
Post:Re: W6BQ2 – Team Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee says “A lot of time was wasted with each member being called by one person to confer and then go on to the next. Then the conversation will more than likely evolve to one that will leave the person that was talked to first not knowing something that the next, or the next, person talked about and the leader discussed.”
Had I not stepped forward to do this singular phone calls, I don’t think any sort of group communication or consensus would have been properly reached. I tried to set up a collective meeting time, which we had a surprising amount of difficulty doing. I tried to get people to go into Blackboard’s virtual classroom, and was present for several empty sessions myself, though one or two, yourself included, did visit. Most people in our group did not visit this resource. As a result, we faced either all doing different plans, or one of us bringing us together in some other way. The individual phones calls were that way.
I’m sorry and surprised that you felt my individual calls were a ‘waste of time’ – it was, for me, at least, two hours of work on my vacation, on my phone, for the benefit of the project, without which I feel that we might have had much more confusion. The conversation did evolve, and I made everyone aware of those small evolutions after all the calls were made using email.
Had you gotten the leadership role, [remember, I voted for you!] you might have chosen some alternative method that would not have been a waste of time. Maybe next time you’ll get that chance. πŸ˜‰
If you think there was only one type A personality in our group, I think you may want to look again. This is, after all, a class on leadership.
Also, if there’s a better tool for collaborative writing than Google Docs, I hope people make me aware of it. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Post:Re: W6BQ4 – Start, Stop, Continue
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
START – I would say that some of the things that you ended up making available to the class as resources, such as your notes on what constitutes a good paper and key points of emphasis on APA style were very useful. I’m sure that you considered it fairly remedial, but for those of us who haven’t taken classes in 10 years, or even written in APA style, it was very, very useful. This was my first graduate class, and the extra help was appreciated. In another class, you might not have gone through the trouble to post these notes. Despite the potentially remedial nature of these resources, I urge you to make them standard issue.
STOP – Please forgive me. Although I feel like some of my classmates would disagree, and should, I would say that the resources of least value were the poetic, animated, or motivational-poster variety of peripheral resources.
I love poetry – especially haiku – but on one hand I felt somewhat obligated to respond to them but on the other hand questioned their lack of academic credential. I would possibly move them to their own section away from the weekly discussion, so that ignoring them (cringe) would not potentially affect our grade or let us worry that ignoring them might do so. At the same time I recognize that these postings may very well have been the highlight of some of my classmates’ visits to the course.
CONTINUE – I would say that the clear definition of the assignments, the assessments, the rubrics, the questions and subsequent questions, your welcoming and encouraging attitude, your sometimes dangerous questions, and your ready availability were all very welcomed aspects of this course. I can say that in so many ways this course was so much better – so much more in depth, and so much more engaging than any in person class I ever took as an undergraduate or anywhere else in my academic career. It makes me very proud to be so deeply engaged in managing Blackboard, since it helps so many to discuss topics in this way.
Tim, it was an absolute pleasure to work with you, and I’d recommend your class to anyone. Thanks again to everyone in the class, and I’m sure I’ll see you in Blackboard soon!
Thanks!
John.
Thread:W6BQ3 – Growth
Post:Re: W6BQ3 – Growth
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that before taking this course, I saw leadership as a titled role. I thought that leadership was something you earned the right to practice. I thought that leadership and management were interchangable terms. I thought that leadership was only available to those who were given license to lead. I generally made no connection between leadership and motivation before our discussion, which now seems absurd. I thought that motivation began and ended generally with salary.
I know now that leadership can be practiced by anyone at any time. I know that motivation is the key to leadership, since in order to get someone to do something, they need to have something of valence in return, even if it is just that warm, fuzzy feeling. I know that leaders can choose the ways in which they motivate so that the outcome, the process, and the organization all benefit, rather than just the leader.
I know now that there are hundreds of ways to motivate others, lots of ways to manage and build on conflict, and that just because most organizations do things a certain way doesn’t mean that it’s the only – or best – way to do it.
Thanks very much to Tim and class for helping me to understand leadership and motivation more fully.
John.
Thread:W6BQ2 – Team Conflict
Post:Re: W6BQ2 – Team Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We were lucky that we did very little ‘storming’ in our learning group, but that may have been in part by design, in part by the lack of ‘storming time’.
We made a lot of use of voting mechanisms, so that people could voice their opinions about a particular direction, tool, or decision.
We also supplemented visual discussion tools with some phone calls, emails, and other communication tools, so that messages could be interpreted and acted on in different ways.
I would say that in our group, any person who took an initiative was the one who got the jump on a decision, and very little challenge happened to occur within our particular group dynamic. In another group, there might have been more backlash, but in ours, the first idea was usually altered very little.
I would suggest that if you really care about a direction in your group work, get it out there as quickly as possible, because in our case it happened to be the thing that determined what ended up happening in a few cases.
For instance, I was really set on using Google Docs and Spreadsheets, because I knew the power that it had for collaborative work, and so I put it out there as quickly as possible, with the idea that if no one else had a strong preference, that it might gain some acceptance early on. That particular idea worked in my group. Other matters in the group project meant a lot less to me. If I had waited even a day to suggest GDS, something else might have been proposed and settled on before anyone had even heard of my deep want to use this particular tool.
I would also say that if you plan on having an in depth discussion on a final set of project revisions with one or more team members, that you should choose a time that you are not in desperate need of sleep, rest, or patience. The communication method you choose will have some influence on success too.
It makes it a lot easier to consider 40 changes when you are not looking to rest your head on a pillow or recovering from a generally bad series of events. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W6BQ1 – Personal Motivation
Post:Re: W6BQ1 – Personal Motivation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Many of us at Rider are very lucky in this particular respect. Some people get off as many as five weeks a year including the holiday break, and we are generally encouraged to take it. I just enjoyed one of two weeks I planned for this summer – another coming in July.
It’s not until you hear about it being something someone else wishes for that you realize how lucky you are to have it yourself. Thanks, Daniel.
John.
Thread:W6BQ1 – Personal Motivation
Post:Re: W6BQ1 – Personal Motivation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tashira says “Although money is good, happiness is better.”
Some people never get this wisdom for their entire life.
John.
Thread:W6BQ1 – Personal Motivation
Post:Re: W6BQ1 – Personal Motivation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I feel that the things that I value most in my job are the freedom to choose my work, the ability to take classes, the ability to tend to my family, the need to feel proud of what I do, the ability to manage my responsibilities in the way that I wish as long as the job gets done, the ability to engage creativity, the ability to explore new technologies at will, the ability to create my own goals, the ability to change when the need makes itself clear, and the ability to experiment. I have most if not all of these on an ongoing basis in my current position.
There are many more things than these that I have in my position that make my job much more valuable to me than the salary depicts, but I’m not complaining about that aspect either. I absolutely love what I do, and it has so much to do with freedom.
John.
Thread:W6AQ5 – Quality Programs
Post:Re: W6AQ5 – Quality Programs
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We also had a brief HR stint where the FISH! principles were offered in training sessions. The main ideas are summarized on their website at charthouse.com :
Be There, Play, Make Their Day and Choose Your Attitudeβ„’. FISH! is a wisdom that everyone can embrace.
In the end, it was just another attempt to simplify motivation. I was deep into it, and felt like it would solve all of our problems. Somehow.
“Be There” is what Gerzon would call ‘Presence’
“Play” is what 100 ways… would call “Make a Game of It”
“Make their day” is just what it sounds like.
“Choose your Attitude” is generally discussed in 100 ways… too in that your enthusiasm can be turned on and off as you wish, so why not turn it on?
In fact, the saying that is repeated in 100 ways… about a “fish rotting from the head down” is actually used to dismiss the FISH! theory the first time it appears.
Motivation isn’t simple, and while the 4 FISH! ideas are nice, in retrospect they are not likely the 4 things I would choose as the 4 most important ways to motivate people, most of all myself. I found the “smile ” one pretty difficult, for example. I feel like it’s a bit of fortune cookie wisdom applied to a problem as big as house.
John.
Thread:W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Post:Re: W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
In OIT, each director and manager arranges to stay for the whole day on one of the half day Fridays. I always try to take the first available Friday.
It’s one way to contribute to the allowance of half day Fridays – it definitely makes me feel better when I leave at 12 on Fridays that I took the time to work through one of them to allow others to go home. I feel like it was earned.
Not to mention, it has to be the best time of the entire year to get something done, when you’re one of 6 people on campus.
John.
Thread:W6AQ3 – HR Role
Post:Re: W6AQ3 – HR Role
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This topic is of special significance for me, as my organization has just recently decided to bring in Rider’s EAP in order to do an organizational assessment for the purposes of team building, conflict resolution, and a department level climate survey.
It’s being billed as an employment psychology session. I plan to hear lots of inquiry, some dialogue, some council, and hopefully some innovations.
We are all meeting tomorrow at 8 am to meet the interviewers, and each of us have a mandated slot with the interviewers which will be confidential, exploratory, and hopefully will break some of the long standing silence in some members of our organization.
I am thrilled that we are going to have this opportunity, but some people are upset, and many people are confused. I know of one or two who are scared. I know of one person in particular who is likely petrified.
This one person has had the most turnover, has established the most enemies, and has ruled their part of the department with an iron tongue. I imagine it will not be a fun day for them.
However, for the rest of us, it may be an opportunity to get to dialogue with someone with some insights into leadership to establish an overhead view of what’s going on in our organization, and a resulting plan of action to help rebuild and change.
John.
Thread:W6AQ1 – Transformation Possible?
Post:Re: W6AQ1 – Transformation Possible?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I do agree with the see-feel-change theory, and I think that it may be a significant barrier for many organizations that are already battling or engaged in conflicts.
If it is an environment where a group of people feel like they need to have walls up to protect themselves, or where a set of people decide that machismo is the way to show power, or where an acknowledgment of emotion, feeling, or even optimism might be seen by one’s self or one’s opponent as a sign of weakness, it may be very hard indeed to get people to be enthused about a positive change – to feel it and show that they feel it.
But without that awareness of feeling, without that openness of minds, without that ability to stop talking and just listen, the organization may fall deeper and deeper into despair, conflict, and noncommunication.
There has been a recent shift in the openness to feeling positive amongst some key players in my organization, and it has made a great deal of difference in trying to bring about an organizational transformation.
John.
Thread:See You Soon
Post:Re: See You Soon
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I thought maybe I saw you in there. πŸ˜‰
Talk to you very soon.
j.
Thread:HAPPY TRAILS TO YOU πŸ™‚
Post:Re: HAPPY TRAILS TO YOU πŸ™‚
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for a great learning experience, Tim!
John.
Thread:See You Soon
Post:Re: See You Soon
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Bye Kieanna! I think we all had fun.
John.
Thread:W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Post:Re: W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It just seems like these complaints are, each one, an opportunity for you. I strongly believe that the state is ‘just another organization’, and that your leadership [yours!] could start to move that iceberg to melt.
I continue to wish you the best of luck, and hope that if there’s any way we can help you, by talking with you about how you might convert these conflicts, giving some outside perspective, etc., that you’ll call on us. I can surely speak for myself that I’d be happy to help.
You say that “in order to get to the top and make changes you need credentials”
My feeling is that your future credentials won’t mean a thing in reality if the insight you gain from your education on leadership can’t be applied right now, today. If we’ve learned nothing else, we’ve learned that leadership can be applied from where you are, no matter where you are, in the organization. If you can motivate people you can lead them, whether you have a title or not.
John.
Thread:W6AQ5 – Quality Programs
Post:Re: W6AQ5 – Quality Programs
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that one simple interpretation is that TQM and ISO9000 are programs – guidelines, standards, and universal approaches to business practices and customer satisfaction.
Philosophies, in contrast, might result from the adaptation of an organization’s strategic plan to meet the guidelines set in ISO9000 or TQM.
While no one could take the ISO9000 guidelines off the press and consider it a philosophy without adaptation, the changes that occur in the organization as a result of the inclusion of the principles of the program could be part of the organizational philosophy.
I think that it’s a matter of semantic interpretation, and that you could more specifically say that all ISO9000 compliant/certified organizations incorporate ISO9000 principles into their own philosophy, but that the standard, in itself, does not constitute a philosophy. You might also say that all TQM compliant organizations emphasize customer satisfaction as part of their philosophy, but TQM is not the whole philosophy. If it were, the company would not likely be paying real attention to its mission.
An analogy comes to mind: ISO9000/TQM::Adobe Photoshop as Philosophy::myfile.psd – in otherwords – the standard is a tool by which you render an outcome.
You might use Adobe Photoshop, and another company might use Adobe Photoshop, but the use of the application does not result in identical images – though you might use the same file types.
Another benefit to using these standards is transferability and interoperability – someone who uses Photoshop at another organization would be able to transfer many of the skills to your organization: know the language, be familiar with the tools, etc. However, the philosophical application of those tools would likely be different – your organization’s designs may be more muted, more grid oriented, they might use different kinds of photography, etc. and the transferred designer might have to adapt their design philosophy to meet the needs of your organization’s design rules, despite using the same application.
John.
Thread:W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Post:Re: W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tashira,
We really need to get you out of there, or we need to help you to establish the leadership base necessary to change things.
It seems like so many of your posts focus on the conflicts, the inequity, the unfairness, and the impossibility of transformation in your organization.
What are some ways that you can incorporate the tools of Gerzon, Semler, or Chandler & Richardson into your work processes to begin the necessary change to make work a reasonable place for you to be?
How could you motivate your employer to be more aware of your feelings? How could you reward them when they take you into consideration? How could you entice them to want to give you the flextime you deserve? How could you motivate your co-worker to alter their flex-time to accommodate your schedule? What might you do for her?
If you don’t find out, or don’t want to find out, you may need to move on and start somewhere else with a new outlook.
Have you asked yourself if you really want to work where you work? Can you envision going to work and being happy if, for instance, three things were changed? If the people, environment, or the hierarchy changed, would everything be “all better”? If so, what are the things that need to change? Can you make these things happen? How? If you can’t, can you modify the current situation to make it reasonable?
Have you ever made a list of what your grievances are with your work, aside from what you post here? If you have that list, are there 5 people you could share it with in your organization to make them aware of how you feel?
What is of valence to you? What do you value in your job? Is it the money? Do you have your best friends working there, and you’re putting up with the rest of it to hang out with them? Why are you staying? The job must get something of value from you too – are you absolutely fantastic in your job? Would you be missed if you left today?
When you say that your employer really does not care, I wonder if there’s any way you could verify that, or if that is simply an assumption based on your own internalization of things that have happened.
I know that this class has raised a million questions for me about how I feel about the not-so-great parts of my job. First and foremost, my new question is “what can I do about it?” and the answers are in the millions too.
I hope you come to a resolution – I think we’ve all likely been in jobs that we’d rather not be at, but my feeling now is that I might apply the tools we’ve learned about to make things better, or if that failed, move on to apply my skills where I’d be enthusiastic and my employer would appreciate it.
Best of luck!
John.
Thread:W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Post:Re: W6AQ4 – Life-balance
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
All work and no play makes Jack a bad employee. If you don’t feel that it’s enhancing or improving the quality of your life, how long will it take before you stop putting in the effort necessary to do your job well?
On the other hand, if all you do is play all day long, and never accomplish anything, your supervisor may start to wonder why you’re there.
As in most issues, moderation is key. No one should have to work all day and night without a break to rejuvenate or the enjoy their conquest’s spoils. Of course, everyone should know the limits, bounds, and extent of their recreation time, so that the work that needs to get done gets done, and so no one feels that they’re more or less invested than someone else.
An imbalance of work/life balance can easily lead to conflicts with self, co-workers, the organization, or home life. It is a key potential issue for the avoidance, aversion, or reconciliation of conflict.
There’s also the whole issue of not being able to think or work properly without rest and other Maslowian base needs.
John.
Thread:W6AQ3 – HR Role
Post:Re: W6AQ3 – HR Role
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that human resources can assume the roles of:
mentor: Where staff in HR can be available to talk on a regular basis about the techniques that they are using to get the job done, and get feedback outside of their department.
financial adviser or patron: Where staff in HR can talk about the financial status and situations concerning the employee, give sound financial advice incorporating the benefits offered, and ensure that the em
instructor: HR can act as a development resource in terms of personal growth, business and industry sensibility, and interpersonal communications.
psychologist: HR can act as a part of a support network where an employee can turn to someone to talk to that is outside of their circle of hierarchy, but aware of the unique facets of their shared industry.
mediator: HR can be skilled in the tools of the mediator, and apply them in situations where conflicts exist.
I think that in many ways this is a continuation of existing roles of HR departments, but I think there could be more of an emphasis on support, employee empowerment, and democracy.
John.
Thread:W6AQ1 – Transformation Possible?
Post:Re: W6AQ1 – Transformation Possible?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think Herring’s bullet list you shared with us is a great set of principles – it really condenses and affirms what we’ve learned from Semler’s organization, but also seems to show it in a less revolutionary, more sensible light.
I feel, for instance, like these are all things I could propose in various ways to my superiors, which may or may not go anywhere, or I could just take the advice of “100 ways to Motivate Others” to “58. Always Show Them” and apply these principles in my own office and in other organizations.
I can begin to share information about my systems with other groups.
I can establish democratic methods to make sure that all decisions are group decisions, not mandates from on high.
I can make sure that when I’m doing something that only I know how to do, that I offer to bring someone in to look over my shoulder, if they’re available.
I can make sure that employees have a voice to determine their own direction and change course to get to our goals however they need to.
I can make sure there’s no ‘boss’ in our office.
I can make our budget available for review pretty easily.
I can make sure that everyone knows that they can attend any meeting on my shared calendar.
And I plan to. Thanks for the great share, Terri.
John.
Thread:W6AQ2 – Motivation Design
Post:Re: W6AQ2 – Motivation Design
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
At http://humanresources.about.com/od/humanresourcesstrategic/l/aahr_trends.htm there was a good article on some trends in HRM.
Susan Heathfield (2007, pp. 1-2 ) says that some key HRM trends include the “(elimination of) Human Resources Jargon”, “Employee Empowerment,” “Workforce Stability,” and “Worker Choices.”
Heathfield says that eliminating HR Jargon is important because employees often don’t understand HR terminology starting with “Human Resources” itself, and that lack of understanding can be a barrier to support (2007, p. 1).
Heathfield also tells us that Employee Empowerment is “enabling and empowering line managers and other employees to do the job themselves” (2007, p.1).
Susan Ward (2007, p.2) says that another trend is Workforce Stability, which might be reinforced by an HRM group “extending their mandate to providing all kinds of services to employees, such as training, counseling, and coaching.”
Roger Herman (2007, p.2) says that Worker Choices is an emerging trend in HRM, where “more workers will become independent contractors, operating as contingent workers in response to ever-changing needs of employers. Like nomads, they will move from workplace to workplace without constraints” and that β€œthese free agents will decide when they work, where they work, and why they work.”
I can see each of these as elements of motivational design, in that the elimination of Human Resources Jargon might help an employee who is intimidated by the jargon to seek out HRM services if it’s clearer what they are there for. Employee empowerment certainly seems like it would have some motivational power – I think that many employees would welcome a situation that puts them more firmly in control. Workforce stability is a motivator for many – the idea of being at a job or working with a team that could drop out from under me seems like it might make me trust that job or team less, and feel like any investment in either one could be a lost investment. Worker choices seems like it would have motivational elements as well – if I am told what my job is every day, and told further that I’m not to stray from that path, I would be demotivated to be creative or innovative, and would feel that I was simply an automaton in a Ford style assembly line.
By aligning these kinds of HRM trends and motivational tools with organizational strategies, they can be emphasized, reinforced, and focused upon as goals by the entire organization.
John.
John.
Thread:W6AQ1 – Transformation Possible?
Post:Re: W6AQ1 – Transformation Possible?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think transformation is possible, and I feel like some companies can blindly stumble upon successful transformation though trial and error, but I think that in Tim’s example organization, lots of things were put in place peripherally to make the transformation more likely to be successful.
For example. the rules for success were defined. People’s strengths and valence were defined. The company looked at what was valuable to the employees – not what they ‘should’ value.
Internal teams were used, with minimal outside intervention, which likely helped to ease the tension of bringing in someone who wasn’t aware of local variables to install a lot of ‘best practice’ changes.
They applied theories and used techniques – like behavioral event interviewing – to develop their plan. It was not a situation where the president said “hey this other company is succeeding, and I think it’s because they’re doing this – let’s do that too. ” Instead the proper inclusion of employees was committed to, which will likely build trust and insure buy in.
Also – they did not install the changes without support – they offered development plans, training, new appraisals, coaching plans, and other innovations that would strengthen understanding of the changes, and assure the stakeholders that they would have a support structure.
Without extra planning, support, and inclusion techniques, it’s less likely that a major organizational transformation would succeed in the same way.
Of course, even with these extra steps, the transformation may fail.
John.
Thread:Week 5B Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 5B Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Shaun says “NO matter where you go, conflict is going to be there.”
I agree wholeheartedly. It’s how you deal with it that is the point. Escaping it is a fool’s race.
John.
Thread:W5BQ4 – Conflict & Motivation
Post:Re: W5BQ4 – Conflict & Motivation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Karen says “At Princeton University we also have an Ombusman’s Office that will hear both sides of a conflict and then offer ideas for resolution.”
I would love to see an Ombudsman at Rider.
John.
Thread:W5BQ3 – Conflict & Strategy
Post:Re: W5BQ3 – Conflict & Strategy
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I personally feel that OneStop has some of the greatest potential for success and innovation at Rider. Centralization is one of the ways that students and parents can be helped to reduce the runaround and keep focused on the task of integration into Rider. I applaud OneStop’s, and Drew Aromando’s, efforts. Drew has shown real leadership in the effort, at least from my point of view.
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Jose says “i feel that people should never bring problems to work, or from work to home.”
My question: How do you keep your personal problems from affecting your work life and vice versa?
If you just lost a girlfriend or your mom dies, can that somehow be turned off when you clock in? If your bosds berated you in front of your peers, can/should you keep that from your loved ones?
Should someone with a serious personal issue just take a few hours, days, or weeks off? Should someone with a serious work issue keep it to themselves?
What if those personal time hours just don’t exist? What is the problem is chronic? How does an organization deal with a worker who has a life altering problem that endangers her work life? Ignore it? Ask the worker to keep the problem at home?
Your post raises lots of questions for me – I like that in a post. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W5AQ5 – Globalization
Post:Re: W5AQ5 – Globalization
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It’s funny you should mention it – I’ve now made a personal campaign for Sanda student workers in our office – I’m not sure how it came to be this way – there was no coordinated effort to just hire Chinese students or anything, but we now have three very productive Sanda students in our student workforce under my direction. The language issues have been minimal, but the different perspectives on technology, student issues, cultural insights and what rewards they find valance in compared to American students has given us fantastically different perspectives when executing our parts of the strategic plan.
I would not trade Brian, Robin, or Ze for anything, though Mike, an American student from NYC, isn’t anything to sneeze at.
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I don’t mean to be subversive, necessarily. πŸ˜‰ Though, when all other efforts fail for good leadership to emerge, I’m not against a guerrilla approach.
I just mean to emphasize the idea that leadership can take place at lower levels than the superior hierarchical position. Sometime the leader can be the lowest girl on the totem pole – if her ideas are good and she knows how to motivate towards a common goal, then maybe she can sway the team, and maybe even the supervisor, with good sense, good examples, and sound advice amongst peers.
John.
Thread:Final document sent.
Post:Re: Final [final] document sent.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chadi, Renee, and Learning Group B.
Thanks!
It’s been great to work with all of you, and I was glad I was able to help in the way that I did, but I’m especially grateful for the way that you all were gracious, professional, compromising, co-mediators in our project. You all could have made it much more difficult to complete this project, but you were accommodating conflict resolvers.
I want to note a special thanks to Renee (and any and all resources she used) for her thorough last-hour fine-combing of our final paper. She may have noticed that I did not seem generally appreciative at the time of our final push [12:30 am on Friday morning after a personally disappointing Thursday] but trust me, I had a better state of mind and a much greater appreciation for your attention to detail after sleeping on it.
We have a great product, and it belongs to all of us, but we all may not know that we owe this unsung debt of gratitude to Renee for taking at least two hours to really examine the periods, parentheses, and APA format usage issues that we all will grow to love and memorize in time. She personally introduced at least 30 necessary and notable changes during our revision session. We all did our part, and I want to underline that, but I also want to say that Renee shows us that leadership is a participant’s role, not a title or elected role.
I myself can only say that I have a great deal to learn about consistency and APA format, amongst lots of other things. Luckily, I had a great team to provide strengths where my weaknesses were. πŸ˜‰
I hope you all enjoy the rest of the class as much as I intend to – you all earned it.
John.
Thread:Sharing Group Projects
Post:Re: Sharing Group Projects
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Please see Learning Group B’s attached paper, Motivating a University.
Learning Group B was Carolyn, Chadi, Chris, John, Renee, and Rob. Thanks again for all of your hard work!
John.
Thread:Week 5B Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 5B Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I have really enjoyed 100 Ways to Motivate Others and feel like I will try to incorporate as many of these as I can to make sure that my colleagues, employees, and supervisors are properly motivated to get the job done, help our constituents, and feel rewarded in the process.
I was also very happy that our group project was a success and that we were able to come together from different time zones, schedules, and points of view to make it work.
Thanks so much, everyone.
John.
Thread:W5BQ5 – Chandler & Richardson
Post:Re: W5BQ5 – Chandler & Richardson
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Wow, another vote for 34. Cool.
John.
Thread:W5BQ5 – Chandler & Richardson
Post:Re: W5BQ5 – Chandler & Richardson
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I thought that the echoes of both Semler and Gerzon ideas in these 100 ways was telling of the inclusion of motivational techniques in exemplar leadership. In Tashira’s choice, 34. “Communicate consciously”, for instance, it seems like Gerzon’s “Conscious Conversation” was verified and strengthened as a motivational tool as well as a conflict management tool.
John.
Thread:W5BQ5 – Chandler & Richardson
Post:Re: W5BQ5 – Chandler & Richardson
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
5. Stop criticizing Upper Management. You can remove a potentially major conflict by showing a unified front when it comes to talking about the leadership of your organization. One key possibility that arises from bad-mouthing your superiors is that they find out, take umbrage with your public criticism and ‘conflict’ you right out the door for insubordination. There are better approaches to letting your leadership know how you feel, and plenty of ways to do it in private.
7. Keep giving Feedback. Confusion breeds conflict. When a worker doesn’t know what’s going on, it’s more possible for them to do something out of keeping with the plan, which is a sort of conflict. If a worker doesn’t have some way of knowing how they’re doing right now, this day or this week, it’s more likely that a conflict will emerge where they make assumptions about how they’re doing, or what they should be doing. As in most leadership issues, communication is key, and feedback makes for better communication.
13. Tell the truth quickly. Trust is built on truth. Not telling the whole truth or outright lying will break a trust quickly, and breaking trust is a sure way to develop an environment where conflict can run amok.
Thread:W5BQ4 – Conflict & Motivation
Post:Re: W5BQ4 – Conflict & Motivation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn says “Conflict management is the process of planning to avoid conflict where possible and organizing to resolve conflict where it does happen, as rapidly and smoothly as possible.”
Is conflict avoidable? Is a quick resolution always the best way? Is there a danger in seeing conflict as something to be washed away with a high powered hose? Might there be some benefit to framing and publishing [therefore giving it a continued life of sorts] both the conflict and the resolution to help those who might engage in the same conflict later find a way out?
John.
Thread:W5BQ4 – Conflict & Motivation
Post:Re: W5BQ4 – Conflict & Motivation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that conflict exists because it is a natural occurance – one person feels one way, and another feels another way, and thus a conflict ensues. It doesn’t have to be a drag-down-beat-up – it just has to be a difference of opinion and an outcome that affects both parties.
I think that conflict resolution is the art of how the conflict is resolved. If one can use accomodation, compromise, arbitration or mediation to resolve the conflict, and the outcomes are acceptable to all parties, then the organization can use those resolutions to grow, improve, have depth and history, and be exemplar as organizations.
I think that if potential leaders ignore conflict, or handle conflict badly, by ignoring the long term effects of an outcome or by simply taking sides and forcing accomodation at the cost of other stakeholders, the motivation of organizational members is likely to go down.
I think that if conflicts are mismanaged, it cuts into what many motivational theories consider to be fundamental – a safe work environment, where feelings are preserved, trust is built, and work can get done without fear of trampled feelings or other potential downsides of conflict mismanagement.
John.
Thread:W5BQ3 – Conflict & Strategy
Post:Re: W5BQ3 – Conflict & Strategy
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
A strategic plan might incorporate the development of leadership (mediation) tools like Gerzon’s in order to allow conflict to become a building opportunity, rather than what it often is: an opportunity for stagnation and derision.
If our own strategic plan were to emphasize the importance of “engaging and transforming conflict through dialogue and inquiry”, giving it as much attention as it has to “developing faculty awareness of innovative teaching techniques” or “developing the international student program” there might be opportunities for programs, funding, and rewarding good mediation skills.
Right now, two competing proposals for an international technologies conference vs. a seminar on mediation technologies would either get funding and recognition or not because of one’s inclusion and the other’s exclusion from the strategic plan.
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Agreed.
John.
Thread:W5BQ1 – Various Styles
Post:Re: liked versus respected leader
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christie, you bring up a good point for clarification and discussion. I am using “exemplary” with a connotation of benevolent, as in ‘exemplar’.
http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/2003/11/10.html says:
exemplar \ig-ZEM-plar; -pluhr\, noun:
1. A model or pattern to be copied or imitated.
2. A typical or standard specimen.
3. An ideal model or type.
4. A copy of a book or text.
and I am using it in forms 1. and 3. rather than 2. or 4. and I am using it in terms of what Gerzon calls a mediator, which I think is a good model or exemplar of what a leader should be.
The key to your response is key to my point, when you say “but for a while (stalin, hitler, and hussein) were able to motivate” I say that a disliked or disrespected leader has longevity issues unless they begin to be liked and respected in some balance. They will not be effective motivators, since their employees won’t own the tasks – they’ll do them out of fear or some other reason, which is a sort of motivation – the worst sort.
That being said, I read in 100 ways how it matters not to be liked as a leader, only to be respected, and I can see the point, but a respected but disliked leader is going to have a less motivated team, than a liked and respected one, in my opinion.
If you had to dismiss one or the other, I’d agree with 100 ways that it’s more important to be respected than liked, but I maintain that some balance of both is preferable.
Thanks for allowing me to clarify, Christie!
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tashira asks “is it possible to eliminate conflict within a company, there will always be negative people no matter the situation”
I think this assumes that all conflict is caused only by negative people, or that all conflict is bad.
Let’s say you and I are tasked with painting a car.
You love baby blue. I really dig red. The boss doesn’t care, he just doesn’t like rust.
You and I are both enthusiastic about painting the car, but we really don’t care for each other’s colors. The job still has to be done, and both of us are considerate of each other’s feelings, but don’t want the car painted in the other color.
Neither of us is ‘negative’. Yet, still, a conflict exists. We both have valid opinions, and we were both asked to be responsible for the outcome. Do we arbitrate? Do we mediate? Does one of us give in and accommodate the other? Do we compromise? Getting a third person involved in resolving this is unnecessary, and might add a new level of conflict that wasn’t there before. Maybe the third person likes green. [Ew!] We can find a way to work it out, maybe through a blueish purple, but my point is, conflict sometimes exists amongst calm, sensitive caring people, and the resolution is the whole point.
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Marybeth,
It’s amazing how often this occurs – it’s as if some managers think that by ignoring or covering up conflict, or separating the conflictors, that somehow, magically, the conflict will go away.
On the other end of the spectrum, it can just go unleashed and uncaged until employees surrounding the conflictors are so scared of the outcomes that they can’t work effectively – they just wait for the next blowup to occur and escalate.
Leaders need to search out conflicts, bring them to light, and apply the mediator’s tools. Just ignoring it or letting it ‘work itself out’ is totally ineffective.
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Daniel said “As long as the conflict isn’t taken personally I think it is beneficial in the workplace. If a conflict between employees becomes personal then it is a problem and should be dealt with accordingly. This could lead to an uncomfortable environment and effect other employees as well. ”
I would say that those conflicts – the ones that are obvious, real, heated conflicts, are the ones that need to be mediated and fully, openly, and officially addressed, rather than just forbidden or eliminated in some superficial way.
This discussion brings to mind Burgess’ “A Clockwork Orange”, where Alex, a violent and reckless teenager who is arrested and given chemical and psychological treatments to prevent his violent tendencies by negative reinforcement is possibly made inhuman by the removal of his free will.
In the discussion of the removal of conflict, let’s say that we could all take a pill and become incapable of engaging in conflict – would it make us better or worse off? More or less humane? More or less human? Would we get things done quicker and in a more streamlined way? If we were more efficient due to a lack of conflict, would it make us blissfully happy, or utterly despaired, or somewhere in between?
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Charles said “Eliminating conflict could stifle creativity in the organization.”
Hear hear.
John.
Thread:W5BQ2 – Management Control
Post:Re: W5BQ2 – Management Control
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Absolutely not. Any relationship without conflict is an organization where trust or truth or both are not present.
In a communicative, open, democratically run organization, conflict will thrive, and hopefully, through that same communication, conflict will be addressed, resolved, and will help to improve the organization.
Without conflict, you have autocracy. In a system where no one voices their opinion, it’s because they’ve been taught not to, not because they don’t have anything to say about an issue.
John.
Thread:W5BQ1 – Various Styles
Post:Re: W5BQ1 – Various Styles
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Again, I think that answering one over the other out of context is just asking for examples where the opposite would be true.
A leader must be able to be liked and respected to some degree on a moving scale.
A leader who isn’t liked may be able to get some things done, but it will be an uphill battle, since the workers who don’t like the leader will eventually find a way to thwart her, overthrow her, or just stop following her.
A leader who isn’t respected will lose the ability to lead in a similar fashion.
If we all agree that a true leader is one who leads others by motivating them, showing by example, and having a vision that the followers can share and own, it may be impossible to gather the followers who want to be led by someone they don’t like and respect.
Does anyone here know of an exemplary leader who is either not liked or not respected?
I’m sure to eat my words shortly. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W5BQ1 – Various Styles
Post:Re: W5BQ1 – Various Styles
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think compromise is where each party gains an acceptable portion of what they want, and loses an acceptable portion of what they want to gain some resolution to conflict.
I think accommodation is where one party decides to give the other party as much as they can sacrifice reasonably to resolve a conflict, possibly at their own loss or peril, with the longer term interest of keeping the peace or mending the relationship for future partnerships or customer loyalty.
I think mediation is where a third party is brought in to provide an unbiased point of view, be a referee of sorts, keep a calm head, and work to keep the issues in focus while keeping emotions at bay. This style is detailed nicely in Gerzon’s Leading Through Conflict.
I think arbitration is where two parties essentially debate until a resolution is reached. It seems like this is a relatively ineffective approach compared to the others.
Which is the best? Of course this is probably a ‘trick’ question. The best conflict resolution style is the one that fits the needs of the situation. While accommodation may work well for customer relations at Nordstrom’s, it would likely lead to highly angered workforces if used to settle union disputes. Meanwhile, telling customers who want to return something that they’ll need to sit down with a third party mediator is wrong in so many ways, I’ll just say it’s not likely to be effective. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Tomorrow is Not Promised
Post:Re: Tomorrow is Not Promised
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for sharing this poem, Tim.
I think one of the ways this might motivate an individual is if they read “Make every day count. Appreciate every moment. Take from it everything that you possibly can, for you may never be able to experience it again…” and take it to heart, they might be motivated to make the extra effort to do something towards a goal – to make the trip they always talk about but never find the time for – to spend time – right now – with the children and friends.
There is a strong emphasis of the emotional goals of intrinsic rewards suggested in the poem.
I think one of the ways this might motivate a group is if they look at the part that reads ”
The people you meet who affect your life and the successes and downfalls you experience create who you are, and even the bad experiences can be learned from, In fact, they are probably the poignant and important ones” they might look differently at some small hurt or upset that took place in a group’s efforts towards the goal and see that the upset wasn’t the point – it was the outcome and the experience that was valuable.
Seeing past the pain of a conflict to focus on the resolution is a sign of maturity and possibly the pattern of a group of leaders.
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Maybe that is the channel you need to develop – the dialogue between you and your department. If that seems unlikely, or if you see a roadblock in your supervisor, maybe you can do some cross-mentoring with other peers in other departments, other supervisors who are peers to your malfunctioning supervisor, or even HR as you suggest. Regardless, you should be able to “initiate this conversation” and get the answers you seek, even if it proceeds as a conversation outside of your department.
However, I think we probably agree that it would be best if the conversation could start locally, with your supervisor, and expand outwards, rather than the other way around.
Good luck – if you ever want to talk, I’d be happy to be a cross-mentor with you. I’m sure we could benefit from each other’s insights.
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This is true – as we grow specialization ‘roots’ in this part of our ‘field’, it becomes harder to ‘transplant’.
So to speak. πŸ˜‰
Regardless of the issue I was addressing regarding a long term worker having to start over in their industry, your newly raised issue regarding male/female equality in pay and other compensation/treatment/anything else is a no-contest issue.
In my estimation there is no valid reason for the existing compensation/respect disparity between the sexes, the races, or insert-other-biological-difference-here other than a sickening, long-standing tradition of self-determined false superiority. Above all, people should be treated equally, whatever their differences in color, age, creed, sex, or lifestyle.
John.
Thread:Final document sent.
Post:Re: Final [final] document sent.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
That’s a great attitude, Rob. Thanks for all of your help with the project!
John.
Thread:Week 5A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 5A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I missed the deadline for this, but I still was learning. Again, I was very much preoccupied with the group project, and a little bit off the grid due to vacation, but I’ve enjoyed reading “100 Ways” and plan on incorporating some of these techniques upon returning to work next week.
I really love the concept of bringing games into the equation of productivity. I would love to find a way to find a reward of high valence amongst all of OIT, and find a commonly trackable productivity number, like closed tickets, and allow each closed ticket to equal a turn at chess or cards or some game that culminates in the receipt of the valued reward.
Thread:W5AQ5 – Globalization
Post:Re: W5AQ5 – Globalization
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We might have had a Sanda student attend this class, which would be a globalization issue in our collective organization.
I wonder what kinds of issues we might have encountered because of the location, culture, and other unique properties of the presence of a student located in China but in all other respects, a part of our class.
I wonder if they’d be much different than the issues we encountered by having people from all over this country?
John.
Thread:W5AQ4 – Knowledge Work
Post:Re: W5AQ4 – Knowledge Work
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Do you think that this development makes anyone want to go out and get a degree? Was this Reinforcement Theory at work? [John winks at Rob]
Was there any communication that went along with the policy change? Something that might have said “We want to reward those who have pursued and achieved a bachelor’s degree, because our organization values education and rewards achievement, especially where it feeds our organization’s capabilities”?
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth – do you happen to know what the ranges are for the pay levels? In other words, if I’m a pay level 4 at Rider, do you know what my range is? I know it’s not the sort of thing that’s advertised, but the information exists somewhere. If you knew the ranges, you would at least have some idea of where you stand in the scope of pay scale.
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Renee!
I feel the same way about democracy at work – even in situations where people are given a voice in a smaller decision, like where to go for an office lunch, or what the colors of the office polo shirts should be, people are often strangely silent. It’s really amazing when they are given the chance to speak up on larger issues, such as the design of the web site, which in our case, was positively underwhelming in response and feedback. The same people who don’t come to give us direction in a proper forum will quietly complain about the color or the content a month from now, which is baffling.
Maybe they feel like their suggestion won’t be acted upon, or they might be embarrassed, but if you’re given the chance to speak up, you should definitely make use of it, in my opinion.
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Games as motivational tools
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Great share as usual, Terri,
I also was thinking that one thing that might apply well here is the 100 ways book suggestion of making a game of it.
Is there any way that David could incorporate games into his motivational strategy, so that his team could have some fun, which might invigorate sales, which might get those letters to stop coming?
It seems frivolous when you first think about it, but if it moves people to improve performance, who cares how you get there?
Maybe it’s something involving a video iPod or gift certificate or (insert some other reward here), where every time someone makes a cold call that leads to a sale, they get to cut a deck of cards, and the person in the group of participants with the highest card at the end of the month [or the end of the deck, whichever comes first] gets the reward. The increase in sales would surely pay off the (reward), and there would be some good competitive fun to be had.
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Maybe you could take over your department right now, without the title. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Is there any way that some cross training or cross responsibility could occur, so that you might have the benefit of learning about and working with other territories, and possibly getting a level playing field in the process? It seems like this is a fairly arbitrary way to establish one’s chances of success, by alphabetization. Might you also be able to get some insight into your colleague’s success via inquiry or dialogue and see if there’s anything non-circumstantial they are doing to get their success, maybe something that they’re not openly sharing that is the real reason for their success and subsequent rewards?
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Rob says “And payscale should be based upon how long someone has been working for a company.”
There’s some issues with this. Let’s say someone works for a company for 10 years. Then, something happens, out of the worker’s control, and she has to move on, though from no fault of her own.
She has 10 years experience, she is a hard worker, she has a family that she supports.
She moves to a new job, and because of this rule, must start at a entry level salary?
She starts at the same price as the janitor who has no training, education, or experience? I mean fair is fair, but I think experience, education, and history should command a certain price.
John.
Thread:Final document sent.
Post:Re: Final [final] document sent.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Final [final] document sent – hope you all enjoyed working together as much as I did. Special thanks goes to Renee, without which we might have lost about 10 points in simple but important formatting and APA style mistakes. Thanks, Renee!
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree – there is a different kind of connotation to a university president who is flaunting profits in a shiny new car. In business, it might be seen as celebrating success. In a University parking lot, it might be seen as an unnecessary use of tuition increases.
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Not that it’s anything like open salary publishing, but I think Rider tried to make some awareness of this in a salary inquiry a few years back, where everyone ended up in a layered pay scale. Since we all know the highest and lowest ranges of the scales and caps, [let’s say 15,000-25,000 is level 1, and 200,000-300,000 is level 10] we may have some idea of what people on the high end are making, but since Mort was hired long after those scales were established, maybe, like in spinal tap, it goes up to 11 now. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Post:Re: W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This particular path has happened more than once at Rider, where an employee gets a chance to show their worth, and Rider gets a no-risk trial period with the worker to ensure a smooth working environment and interpersonal relationship with the contingent worker. If it doesn’t work out while they are a contingent worker, they get swapped out – if it does work out and there is an opening, the worker moves into the open spot, more often than not.
However, if the trend is away from a native work force and towards an as-needed work force, this is backwards thinking.
John.
Thread:W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Post:Re: W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree.
I’m of the mindset that there has to be some perceived equality between a temp or other contingent worker and a native worker. If some image of superiority comes up on either side, it widens the natural divide that exists between two workers from different companies.
If everyone in the office wears red, and the contingent worker wears blue, for instance, what kind of message does it send from one worker to another? If you think that’s a silly example, think about how some contingent workers wear uniforms at companies with loose or casual dress codes.
John.
Thread:W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Post:Re: W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that a leader should consider communication one of the highest priorities, and I think that explaining why any process that might have confusion or doubt attached to it might benefit from open discussion.
Otherwise, such as in the case of a third party vendor representative getting an office with a door, and many native company workers working in cubicles, there will be gossip, a sense of entitlement, fear, uncertainty, doubt, confusion, and possibly a work slowdown or other unofficial show of employee dissidence.
If native workers feel like there is a difference in status between themselves and the third party workers, there will be fallout from it – if the contingency is treated either better or worse than the natives in pay, status, or any other status item, there will be an imbalance in the two working groups, but with communication this might be resolved – without communication, reasoning gives way to hurt feelings.
A leader would take all workers’ feelings into consideration – ask people how they felt – engage the process of change through communication, dialogue, and inquiry, and not hold existing situations as a given, but be open to change to make a balance in the workforce.
John.
Thread:Final document sent.
Post:Final document sent.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Well, friends,
Attached to an email sent to your Rider account is our ready-to-submit document. Please take a look, and consider the collaborative effort that produced it.
You’ll notice at first glance, it is now all of one color, as should be our effort at this point. πŸ˜‰
Please note that in some cases I did some surgery, and please understand that I made changes with your original work being respected at all costs.
Please look at the document for APA correctness in particular.
No numbers should occur to enumerate objects in the flow of content – they should be spelled out. e.g. ‘one’ not ‘1’
All spelling should be correct.
All citations and references should be present and correct.
Each paragraph should start with an indent.
You know the drill.
More than anything, enjoy your collaborative work, and accept my appreciation for your willingness to work together.
Unless I hear anything with halting commentary by midnight Thursday, I will consider this ready to submit, and will submit it once I hear from you all in the affirmative that you are willing to consider this our joint effort, or at the very least, compromise to accept this as our joint effort.
I will look for your responses both here and by email – whichever you prefer. I hope to hear from you shortly.
John
Thread:06.19 11:52 pm update
Post:Re: 06.19 11:52 pm update
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Looks great – my remaining work should be short and sweet – thanks for the feedback, Chris – all good comments.
Look for the proposed final Word doc by email later today [thurs]
John.
Thread:06.19 11:52 pm update
Post:Re: 06.19 11:52 pm update
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think you’re fine, Renee – I had a mishap with my laptop, and so wasn’t able to reply sooner – all apologies.
John.
Thread:Plan for Thursday.
Post:Re: Plan for Thursday [today].
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, all! – my vacation ended early, and I have a broken laptop [long, sad story], but otherwise, all is well.
I just sent you a ‘viewer’ gdocs invite to replace your ‘collaborator’ status, in case you want to look at what you have so far in the gdoc version, but I will be working in a local Word Document from here on out. When I have what I think is the ‘final’ doc, later today [Thurs] I will send it out for your review and approval before submitting it tonight.
Talk to you soon!
John.
Thread:Plan for Thursday.
Post:Plan for Thursday.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 20, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Unless anyone objects, I plan to make the google doc a read-only document again after midnight on Wednesday, so that no major new changes or edits occur.
I will take the paper and export it to a Word Document, make any final APA formatting fixes, spelling fixes, etc., but of course I will not be altering your content in any way, unless you specifically ask me to.
After I have done this final error sweep sometime thurs, I will distribute the word doc via email for you all to review, and scan for errors, etc.
I still plan on submitting the doc by midnight Thursday, as everyone pulled together so very nicely to work within our plan.
Thanks! We’re almost there.
John.
Thread:06.19 11:52 pm update
Post:Re: 06.19 11:52 pm update
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 20, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chadi – your edits were perfect – thanks for the quick turnaround, as usual.
John.
Thread:06.19 11:52 pm update
Post:Re: 06.19 11:52 pm update
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 20, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn – great – the word count is good and the balance is there – the only thing I still see is some formatting and spelling, which I did not want to touch myself, in respect of your writing. I made notes at the end of your section in blue – nothing major, just a few words. If you take care of it by midnight Wednesday, that’s great. If you leave it as it is, I will take care of it myself tomorrow, but I wanted to give everyone their own opportunity.
Great work!
John.
Thread:06.19 11:52 pm update
Post:Re: 06.19 11:52 pm update
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 20, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Looks great Renee – I reduced mine to 301 from 355 – funny we both had the same number on first draft. regardless – I think we’ll be okay in the range of 50 over or under target. I thought your content was well written and balanced, and I appreciate your work.
If you want to make any changes, you should feel free until midnight tonight.
Thanks!
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 20, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Rob!
John.
Thread:Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Post:Re: Robert is found and on board
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 20, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m sure you’ll come through, Renee.
John.
Thread:06.19 11:52 pm update
Post:06.19 11:52 pm update
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I see Renee in gdocs right now, and am assuming she’s preparing to add her draft and intro/conclusion summary sentences, references, etc.
Thanks to everyone for getting your content in so very quickly!
here are some notes for potential edits by tomorrow at midnight:
Chadi’s well-sized 306 word section on Maslow’s Hierarchy defines the theory over two paragraphs, but does not really talk about the application of the theory at all, which is the point of the paper, rather than the theory itself.
Chadi – I’d like you to address this by editing to make your section more balanced between definition of the theory and application of the theory. Currently, the reader does not know how admissions might be motivated in terms of Maslow’s theory. We only know what the theory is. How might one use Maslow’s theory to motivate your group?
Chris’ section is wonderful in terms of real world application and has depth, but is currently 485 words – 185 more than we really need or can use. Chris – can you please edit down your section so that it is 150-180 words less?
Carolyn – your section comes in at 395 words. We need you to cut about 80-90 words. Also, while your section talks at length about your theory, it does not talk about any practical application of it. How might ERG theory be used in real life to motivate your group? Can you make up a university specific example, while reducing your total word count?
Robert – both your portion word count and content balance are right on track, in my opinion – I’m thrilled that you were able to get up to speed so quickly!
Please feel free to refute, discuss, or suggest changes for any section here in the discussion thread, rather than in the gdoc. I trust that we can continue to agree on forward movement and focus, and that your changes, corrections, word reductions, and formatting finalizations can be in place by midnight on 6.20, Wednesday.
I hope that you all look at my section with an editor’s eye, and I know that my section is oversized a bit as well. I’ll get to reducing tomorrow!
Renee – we’ll take a look at your additions tomorrow sometime – I have no doubt you’ll have an insightful section.
Thanks to all for their commitment, patience and collegiality in our endeavor!
John.
Thread:Google document
Post:Re: citations in googledocs
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Looks great Robert! Thanks for coming through with a phenomenal turnaround.
John.
Thread:Google document
Post:Re: citations in googledocs
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Also, just a reminder for everyone who is still drafting, or who has not yet done so, to add their citations and references to the paper as they will appear. Note that even our references are in our respective color. Keep an eye out for Robert in orange!
Everyone should have at least one citation to explain how they came to their understanding of their motivational theory, but more are welcomed. I think we can all agree that a motivational theory is not common enough knowledge to bypass a citation.
John.
Thread:Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Post:Re: Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I talked to Robert – no more calls are necessary.
Thanks again, Renee.
John
Thread:Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Post:Robert is found and on board
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I just talked to Robert and he will have his draft in Google Docs by midnight tonight! Thanks, Renee, and thanks, Robert!
John.
Thread:Google document
Post:Re: Google document
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for your gracious response! πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W5AQ5 – Globalization
Post:Re: W5AQ5 – Globalization
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Well, as has been said here by many, our organization does not have a distinct reward system in place. However, we have empbraced globalism recently through several key partnerships and programs, most notably a relationship with Sanda University in China.
As those relationships grow, the question of equitable increases in compensation comes: When not everyone is earning dollars, or even the equivalent amount of dollars, what does a percentage increase? Is it an increase of the comparable amount in dollars, or is it an increase in a percentage of the native currency, which may be much more or much less depending on the other organization’s currency.
On a note of wider scope, what is the relative percieved valence of a financial increase versus a change in title or another reward as a result of increased productivity or performance? Is performance and creativity valued in the same way in another culture? Can you expect similar valence in a reward by two other cultures, and if not, how do you treat those two other cultures differently to make sure they are both rewarded? An increase of income as a result of an increase in performance or effort is generally accepted and expected in America. Would the same notion be true elsewhere? Could there be a rift between your organization and the other organization’s country as a result of your compensation proposals?
John.
Thread:W5AQ4 – Knowledge Work
Post:Re: W5AQ4 – Knowledge Work
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that knowledge work often has the dubious distinction of being harder to qualify or quantify. With this in mind, I think that it may be harder to compare to things like units sold or profits or other production related performance numbers and so would be harder to assess a knowledge worker’s qualification for rewards. One would have to become more creative in their assessments of performance.
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that it’s hard to call something that you had an opportunity to vote for unfair. You may not like the outcome, but you don’t usually see it as something you didn’t have a voice in.
Voting in elections is a prime example of that for me. I may not always like the election outcome, but when I complain about something an elected politician does, it’s as a voter, not an observer. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W5AQ3 – Changing Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
The reward system may change to become more customized to the individual. If each group of workers exists as part of the company’s core business, and groups that are not a part of that core are relegated to specialty contingency workgroups, such as an outsourced technology or construction group, then the core set of employees ends up having a lot more in common in both organizations. In the case where the technology group in the educational institution is dissolved and a third party provides technology support, the educational org can focus on the common goals of educating more closely, and the technology outsource group can focus on technology issues more closely, which makes the job of the education org HR department, who was previously tasked with finding commonality between faculty and technologists much easier in terms of tracking productivity, aligning production numbers with causality, and finding motivational valences in keeping with the core business.
It’s hard to use a carrot and a stick when some people just don’t like carrots or feel manipulated by the stick, but when you are able to define an array of vegetables to motivate a group of vegans, you’re more likely to motivate.
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’s surprised by this kind of generality.
You said “Executives are just that people in offices who do not have anything to do, they are sort like CEOs.”
A CEO is chief executive officer. They are executives by the very nature of their title.
An executive is an individual, and should be treated as such. The fact that one is an executive has no bearing whatsoever on how much they have to do, how they do it, or whether they have an office or how they use it.
I know of plenty of executives who have plenty to do, but I can speak specifically about my own role as an executive as the chief marketing officer for a enthusiast group I helped to manage and lead. We did not get offices, and we had an awful lot to do, with no income or other profit aside from a profit of intrinsic rewards.
The idea that there is somebody who has engaged in the learning we have in this class who really believes that all executives are too busy lighting their cigars with currency to think about how to improve their company, motivate their employees, or engage their workers in a discussion about projects is surprising, to say the least.
Isn’t an executive a sort of leader by nature, potentially?
There are lots of executives present here, even if only in executive roles in our projects. Are we all sitting around waiting for the cash to roll in? If so, I need to stop all of the other stuff I’ve been doing! πŸ˜‰
Aren’t each of us executives of our own coursework and learning? Why is ‘executive’ a dirty word for you?
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m not sure what Mort is being paid, but I do feel that he’s likely in a different stratosphere than me. If I didn’t like what he was doing it would be a problem, but as far as I’m concerned, he earns his keep. However, if an openness policy was instituted where his salary was published and my salary was published and everyone’s salary was published, I might feel a little better about our difference in income. I guess I might feel worse too, but I doubt it. Not knowing makes me think that it’s this astronomical difference, but it’s quite possibly a reasonable salary. If it were published, he might make it more reasonable, though.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think you’re likely much more empowered by doing it yourself. Good for you, Elizabeth!
Thread:Posting Pix
Post:Re: Posting Pix – on pixels.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
john hearts google. πŸ˜‰
Thread:Google document
Post:Re: Google document
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Carolyn – I think it’s great tool too! I saw your additions, and like them. You should know, right now your addition is 178 words – we need it a bit closer to 300, so that we can meet our Tim assigned word count. I did see the intro and conclusion additions, but they are not counted towards our 300 words. Thanks for the great work.
John.
Thread:Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Post:Re: Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’ll be doing better when we all have our respective portions in the paper, and I just finished my draft just now. Come on, midnight!
Thanks for your help Renee. If anyone else wants to give him a ringy-dingy, it wouldn’t hurt.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Still waiting on 1 synopsis.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn
Thanks for your addition. The theory synopsis doesn’t actually need to go in the google doc, unless you are using it as part of your application of the theory to your University group, which seems to be the case. The synopsis and the 300 word draft were 2 separate writing items, though the synopsis may form the basis for your application in your draft. It’s a good start, but your addition to the Google doc is only comprised of 178 words. We need no less than 300, but it should not be a great deal more either.
I will copy and paste it below from Google Docs to meet our original agreement, and I will assume you are using it for both your synopsis and your 300 word draft, which is great.
Hoping to see your finished 300 word draft there by midnight. I did like your intro and conclusion sentences, and I appreciate your work on the paper so far.
Can someone, anyone, please get Robert to call me?
John.
Carolyn’s synopsis of ERG Theory:
Clayton Aldefer ERG theory argued that there are three groups of core needs: existence, relatedness, and growth. ERG theory does not assume that needs are hierarchical. Instead, it proposes a frustration-regression relationship: frustration of higher- order needs prompts demand for satisfaction of lower-order needs. The existence group is concerned with providing our basic material existence requirements. Primary living requirement similar to Maslow’s psychological and security needs. The relatedness group reflects our desire to maintain interpersonal relationships. People are concerned on developing interpersonal relationships with others like Maslow’s social and esteem needs. Growth needs reflect our intrinsic desire for personal development. A person’s internal desire for personal development and fulfillment like Maslow’s self actualization.
Dean’s as motivational models for staff and faculty can provide employees with the opportunity to define career goals and create a career plan within the context of the university. Keeping in mind the three groups of core needs each employee will be able to relate to at least, with the goal for the deans being able to promote staff growth through all three core needs.
(178 words)
Thread:Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Post:Call for Help – Robert is MIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
As things are now, we have a solid direction and a scheduled plan. Can everyone please make a point to contact Robert by email or by phone and please ask him to contact me by phone – we now have a small emergency as far as his inclusion is concerned.
He has an active Rider email account, and works at the Student Recreation Center. He is not in the directory, but he might be reached there.
I’ve tried to contact him – I now need your help.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Still waiting on 2 synopses.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 18, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chadi has posted her synopsis – thanks!
I have not heard from Robert yet.
Carolyn has agreed to post her synopsis here soon.
I addition to the synopses, we need your drafts.
Again, we should have the drafts of each of your 300 word portion assignments here on the board and on Google Docs [in place and in your color] by Midnight Tuesday. We should have all suggestions and revisions in place by Midnight Wednesday. We should submit the paper by midnight Thursday. Friday is an emergency contingency day.
John.
Looking forward!
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 18, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chadi – thanks so very much for your synopsis, and please continue with your plan to apply Maslow’s Hierarchy to the Admissions/Sales group.
Can’t wait to see your draft!
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: phone conversations so far…
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 18, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It was my pleasure, Carolyn!
It’s now 4:18 – At this point I’ve had phone conversations with Carolyn, Chadi, and Christine – still hoping to hear from Robert and Renee by 9 pm this evening [Monday] at the latest. Everyone who has called is clear on the plan and some good questions have been asked and answered.
Everyone, so far has been very receptive to the plan, and we should have all of our 300 word drafts prepared by tomorrow [Tues] with a hard deadline of Midnight Tuesday for drafts.
Our paper should be finished and basically prepared for final touch ups by midnight Wednesday.
We should have the paper submitted to Tim by Midnight Thursday at the latest, with Friday available in the case of an emergency.
I thank you all for your professional courtesy, patience and understanding, and look forward to crafting what is beginning to look like a wonderful paper.
John.
Thread:W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Post:Re: W5AQ2 – Executive Compensation
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that Semler’s indication that the CEO was paid a certain multiple of the entry level position was one good way to set a cap. I think Christie said that Whole Foods has this sort of indicator too.
For instance, as a rule, a company might say that the highest paid employee or the CEO or another executive can only ever make ten times that of an entry level employee, salary wise, or some multiple of their lowest paid direct report. This would ensure that either entry level workers were paid a reasonable or generous amount, or that the CEO is paid a relatively reasonable amount,or that a supervisor’s salary was directly tied and bound to their employee’s salary, which would encourage fair and equitable compensation.
Also, of course, a company should commit to doing regular comparative assessments of peer organization compensation to make sure that their workforce has kept in sync in terms of compensation.
John.
Thread:W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Post:Re: W5AQ1- Contingent Workers
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Organizations that utilize contingent workers can have rules about the way contingent workers are treated, and require contingent worker sources [temp workers, agencies, outsourcing companies] to provide a certain level of compensation, benefits, etc. in order to ensure fairness between native workers and contingent workers.
I think that as contracting and contingent work increases, the way that native workers are rewarded will become more focused. It’s possible that companies will be able to use the fact that there’s a less diverse workforce to analyze more completely the functionality and translate it into performance indicators, which may allow for more appropriate comparative performance assessment, and therefore be able to reward more appropriately based on performance.
I hadn’t really considered how people who work at my organization physically but who are actually the employees of other companies are quite differently rewarded than we are. Verizon has several contracted workers who have “offices with doors” at Rider, for instance, and I know that some actual Rider employees who work in cubicles wonder why they don’t have “offices with doors” like the non-Rider workers.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Still waiting on 3 synopses.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We are still waiting for proper motivational theory synopses from Chadi, Robert, and Carolyn. I had hoped to see them by Sunday [tonight] at midnight, but I don’t think that’s happening. πŸ˜‰
We still need them, so that we can properly assess the theories and show that we’re doing our share. I’m also looking forward to talking with all of you by phone at your convenience as per the email that I sent you to your Rider addresses.
Hope you all had a great weekend! It’s going to be a busy week.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Theory Synopsis: Vroom’s Expectancy theory – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
A point of clarification – the formatting was lost in my copy and paste to the post – the following portion of the synopsis was a block quote, and was entirely taken from the web site – the indents were lost in the copy and paste. I am including the entire portion below with quotes and proper formatting.
“Vroom suggests that an employee’s beliefs about Expectancy, Instrumentality, and Valence interact psychologically to create a motivational force such that the employee acts in ways that bring pleasure and avoid pain. This force can be ‘calculated’ via the following formula: Motivation = Valance x Expectancy (Instrumentality). This formula can be used to indicate and predict such things as job satisfaction, one’s occupational choice, the likelihood of staying in a job, and the effort one might expend at work. (valuebasedmanagement.net, 2007)

Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Theory Synopsis: Vroom’s Expectancy theory – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
House and Wahba tell us that the Expectancy Theory of Motivation, also referred to as instrumentality-valence theory is “perhaps the most widely accepted theory of work and motivation among today’s industrial and organizational psychologists.” (Tosi, House and Dunnette, 1972, p. 127) It says “that work-related behavior can be predicted once we know the valence people attach to certain outcomes and their expectations of the occurrence of these outcomes” (Tosi, et al., 1972, p.127). Dunham and Smith tell us that Expectancy Theory sees work performance level and one’s motivation to perform as a result of the combination of three factors: expectancy, instrumentality, and valence. (1979, p. 30) Expectancy is defined as one’s “perception of the likelihood that effort will lead to the intended behavior” and might be expressed as a question: “What is the probability that if I try I can do it?” (Dunham and Smith, 1979, p.32) Instrumentality is the individual’s perception of the likelihood that performance will lead to certain outcomes” and might be expressed as the question “What is the probability that if I succeed, I will get something for it?” (Dunham, et al., 1979, p.32) Valence is defined as the “value that a person attaches to an outcome” and answers the question “how much do I value this outcome?” (Dunham, et al., 1979, p32) All of these are generally transferred into a numeric value, so that one might have a value of 0 to 1 for expectancy where 0 means that it is believed that the task is impossible even if it was attempted and 1 means that one believes it is quite likely that the attempted task would be achieved. (Dunham, et al., 1979, p. 32) Instrumentality ranges from zero to 1.0, where zero means that it is believed that nothing would come from the effort even f achieved, and a 1.0 is the belief that something would be given as a result of the effort if it the task was successfully completed. (Dunham, et al., 1979, p. 32) Finally, Valence ranges from -1.0 to 1.0, where -1 indicates a negative reaction to the outcome, a zero indicates a neutral reaction, and a 1.0 is a positive reaction. (Dunham, et al., 1979, p. 33) Outcomes are classified as intrinsic or extrinsic, and are taken into consideration as such. An example of an intrinsic outcome with a negative valence might be fatigue from overwork. An example of an extrinsic outcome with a positive valence might be a large raise. (Dunham, et al., 1979, p. 32)
To use these values effectively to predict motivation, you may apply them in an equation. valuebasedmanagement.net talks about the application of the formula:
Vroom suggests that an employee’s beliefs about Expectancy, Instrumentality, and Valence interact psychologically to create a motivational force such that the employee acts in ways that bring pleasure and avoid pain. This force can be ‘calculated’ via the following formula: Motivation = Valance x Expectancy (Instrumentality). This formula can be used to indicate and predict such things as job satisfaction, one’s occupational choice, the likelihood of staying in a job, and the effort one might expend at work. (valuebasedmanagement.net, 2007)
While I like this theory a great deal, and see its application as a powerful way to evaluate potential motivation and potential for productivity, I think that its complexity may challenge the size constraints of our individual contribution spaces, given that a reader (whom we always treat as unknowing) would have to have the theory explained in order for us to apply it, which might take 300 words in itself.
references
Dunham, R., and Smith, F. (1979). Organizational Surveys. Glenview, Illinois: Scott, Foresman and Company.
Tosi, H. , House, R., and Dunnette, M. (1973). Managerial Motivation and Compensation: A selection of readings, East Lansing, Michigan: MSU Business Studies
de Jonge, J. (2007). Vroom’s expectancy theory. http://www.valuebasedmanagement.net/methods_vroom_expectancy_theory.html, retrieved on June 17, 2007
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I do not have any such objection. I appreciate your willingness to work within the suggested framework.
Thanks so much for doing your part!
John.
Thread:Week 4A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 4A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
A portfolio of leadership methods and conflict resolutions – now that’s something I hadn’t thought about doing! My design portfolio will have a counterpart soon.
Thanks for the suggestions, Christie!
John.
Thread:Posting Pix
Post:Re: Posting Pix – on pixels.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It had nothing to do with the link – it was definitely the file itself. Plus, there’s nothing wrong with your file – it’s just naturally big. The issue is just about pixels. Simply put, every picture has a set number of pixels.
The number of pixels starts at the source, like a digital camera or a scanner.
The data size in megabytes, for instance, is a result of this number of pixels, but we’ll save that for another discussion.
My picture may be 800 px x 600 px and yours may be 400 px x 320 px, and so yours would appear to be about half of the size of mine on screen or on paper. If you took a high resolution digital picture with a modern digital camera, you might get a default picture size of 3000 px x 2000 px, which may not even fit on someone’s screen if their screen resolution is less than 3000 x 2000 pixels, which most everyone’s is. As a result, when someone takes a high resolution digital picture and takes it right off the camera and sends it to someone else via email, it may be too big to view without zooming out.
An absolutely fantastic tool for managing pictures is Google’s Picasa, a free photo cataloging tool that allows you to make slideshows, fix images, resize, crop and publish pictures to the web, all for free. http://www.picasa.com – You could use a tool like Picasa to take a full sized 1000 or 2000 px wide image (which you’d want to keep a copy of at that size for printing, since good full size prints require a lot more visual information [pixels] to look good) and make a much smaller copy for sharing over email or in a Blackboard discussion board which requires much less information to still look good.
I reduced my image using Picasa, though others may have just had smaller images to start with than you. Yours is a good problem to have in a way. πŸ˜‰
I’d be thrilled to sit and talk with you about digital images any time – it’s one of my favorite subjects, and you’re right around the corner, quite literally.
Ocean City is a heck of a lot of fun so far – I’ll say hi to George’s for you when I’m done at Mack and Manco’s!
Thanks for the good wishes,
John.
Thread:W4BQ3 – Your Organization
Post:Re: W4BQ3 – Your Organization
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m with Charles – any opportunity to ask the question ‘how can I be better?’ is worth participating in, regardless of the financial effect.
John.
Thread:W4BQ2 – Integration
Post:Re: W4BQ2 – Integration
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Well, when I look at the other things that I get as rewards in my job, such as time off, flextime, TIAA CREF matching percentage [which I know is money, but a little different than salary], title, recognition, etc, these could all be increased or decreased comparative to other workers due to performance. However, in the same way I might get demotivated by having a colleague get bonuses every year while I don’t, I might be equally demotivated by someone getting a lot more free time than me. Free time could be seen as a form of income too, I guess.
But, since everyone gets these rewards fairly equally at Rider and there is nothing in terms of comparative performance appraisal to let me achieve an increase in any of these rewards vs. a less productive employee, it doesn’t matter right now, for me.
John.
Thread:Week 4B Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 4B Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This week was a bit tougher than past weeks. With all of the work going on in learning group B, I feel like I’m neglecting the regular discussion thread a bit, and doing a lot more response and interaction than direct answers to Tim’s questions.
In practical applications, a few things: The Thursday Round Table meeting had some good questions: What do you feel is your greatest work strength, and how could you apply it effectively to make OIT and Rider better?
That gave some good insights. What was surprising was that we spontaneously added a second question, which we hadn’t done before: What is your biggest work weakness, and how might you work to eliminate it?
This was our first question dealing with anything of a negative nature, and so I was a little weary, but as it turned out, it was a very powerful set of answers.
My greatest strength was “creativity”
My greatest weakness was a toss up between “punctuality”, “wearing emotions on my sleeve”, and “indecisiveness” the last of these being apparent in my answer itself.
However, one sort of bad thing is that there was a breakdown of the rules to some degree this week – more interactive talking was going on, more discussions and interruptions, and one particularly disturbing situation where someone who had already answered immediately followed someone’s else’s answer with “I just thought of something to add to mine…” which made the person who had just finished know that the person with the additional answer wasn’t listening at all to his answer.
I’m going to find a way to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Listening, not discussion or outdoing one another with answers, is the whole point of the exercise.
Thanks to the class, thanks to Tim, and a special thanks to Learning Group B – keep it up, friends.
John.
Thread:W4BQ5 – Initial Reactions
Post:Re: W4BQ5 – Initial Reactions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It reminds me of a cookbook to get results from employees. It’s much lighter in a lot of ways than the other things we’ve read this semester, but it seems like it has the potential to create some of the biggest impact in applications of all the things we’ve read too. I haven’t gotten very far yet.
John.
Thread:W4BQ4 – Scrunity
Post:Re: W4BQ4 – Scrunity
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I do not think an audit of our PDP processes would result in a positive review, though I think it might cause the changes necessary to make it as effective as it could be across the board.
My organization does not “link the results of performance appraisals to pay increases and promotions”. Pay increases generally happen as a result of union agreements and promotions usually happen as a result of newly created positions or openings that occur naturally in the organization.
John.
Thread:W4BQ3 – Your Organization
Post:Re: W4BQ3 – Your Organization
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Rider’s Performance Development Plan is the Performance Appraisal tool. Its primary purposes are to provide goals for the employee matching the strategic plan, give performance feedback, and allow the employee to help develop their vision for their position.
It serve those purposes well, in my estimation, when the supervisor makes the best use of it according to it’s purpose, but is useless when it is not completed properly. I know because I try to use it properly in my appraisals of employees, but in my own performance appraisal, it is often not given the attention necessary to use it in the intended way – instead items from previous PDPs are copied and pasted in, and reflection and interpretation as well as goal building are glossed over. Goals are often made without my input, and they are generalized and broad.
My organization assesses the performance of employees by the goals set in the PDP. When hard numbers are attached to goals, you can clearly see whether or not someone is performing on target, above target or below target. Since no quantifiable items are in my own goals, it is much harder to assess my performance, though this could easily be rectified if my supervisor were to take the time to codevelop and personalize and quantize my goals.
All supervisors conduct reviews in my organization.
My organization provides raters with Performance Appraisal training sessions to provide accurate and consistent appraisals, though many feel that the training is superfluous and decide to ignore the wealth of advice given in the training.
John.
Thread:W4BQ2 – Integration
Post:Re: W4BQ2 – Integration
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It depends on what you are trying to rate and reward.
Let’s say that we decide to rate and reward supervisory performance. We might do this by using Semco’s sample subordinate review questionnaire and use the numerical results to rate all employees who have direct reports.
All of the various scores of the questionnaires done by the subordinates of one supervisor might be averaged so that all supervisors get a single score.
All perfect scoring supervisors would get a 20% bonus immediately.
The top 5 supervisors by score outside of the perfect scores might get a 10% bonus.
If the issue arose where there were more than 5 supervisors tied with a 98, they would all get the 10% bonus.
Don’t ask me where they get the money from. Maybe instead of it being 10 or 20 percent of their salary, it’s some share of a set amount of money.
It’s fun to think about.
John.
Thread:W4BQ1 – Pay-for-Performance
Post:Re: W4BQ1 – Pay-for-Performance
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that the assumption that “differentials in performance can be observed and measured” is legitimate in many organizational positions, but not necessarily all. In some cases, such as those including units sold, profits, or closed cases, it’s easier to do. In other positions, where, for instance, patients are being treated by human services professionals for mental disorders or students are being taught by teaching professionals, it’s harder to define differentials in performance, and thus harder to observe or measure them. For the mental health professional, what criteria do you decide to monitor for differential performance? Number of patients visited? Number of patients reporting a improvement in their own assessment? For the faculty, do you see how many students said they would take the class again? How many new ideas they got as a result of the class? Very often in academia it comes down to publishing, for instance, in Promotion and Tenure reviews. Might this somehow be quantified and used as a performance indicator?
HR also needs to likely have development programs to give employees equal opportunity in improving their performance, and they have to define and create tools for evaluating performance.
If we were to use our existing PDP to try to equate performance between two employees at Rider, it wouldn’t work because there is no quantitative comparative numerical value to compare between employees in similar roles. There would have to be values attached to existing ratings, like have a distinguished be a 5 and a needs improvement be a 1 in each question answered that way. You’d end up with a number you might be able to use for comparative analysis or performance rating.
John.
Thread:STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Post:Re: STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m thinking that a new approach to sharing information in real time, such as me spending a few minutes on the phone with each team member may help. I’m going to propose this soon.
John.
Thread:STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Post:Re: STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Funny. I’m on vacation. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:WIKIPEDIA
Post:Re: WIKIPEDIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree that wikipedia should not be cited in an academic paper, and I could see you were playing devil’s advocate in terms of Rider’s adoption of the policy. Wikipedia is simply unreliable as an academic source. However, if I understand the extant university policy you mentioned correctly, just using the word itself (wikipedia) in the paper would render it a failed paper. Can anyone clarify the actual policy, or better yet, link to it? If it is as I understand it from Tim’s description, that seems extreme.
Citing an unreliable source I could see as having a negative impact on one’s grade – though a zero seems a bit much, I could at least understand the negative reinforcement benefits. Using one word in an article and having it render all the other words useless seems like outright censorship.
I thank Tim, as usual, for getting us thinking!
John.
Thread:Week 4A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 4A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that frustration is a potential motivator for you to take action against the things you see that are out on sync with good leadership. I feel that frustration now too, and it puts me in the mood to implement change. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Week 4A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 4A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Absolutely, in fact, that’s what I’ve done a few times now since being in this class. Some were more formal, such as the proposal for the Thursday round table council. Some were much less formal, such as the letter I shot off to HR about 360 reviews. My direct supervisor really does not prefer the proposal format, as she really prefers to cut to the chase, but I love it, since it can be crafted and refined and clearly state your purpose.
In a word, absolutely.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Perfect! Since Renee wanted to complete this task in line with per our original plan, now, when we all have posted our synopses, Renee can talk to the idea of applying one to a group. In the meantime, the rest of us should feel free to do both at once – post their synopsis, and attempt application of the theory to a group (sales [now under discussion], production workers [faculty], or admin staff [deans]).
Renee – this is a great, clearly written synopsis and I appreciate the quality and depth of these synopses – I’m looking forward to seeing the rest of them.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee – post your synopsis.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
What would you suggest/prefer as the sales team instead of admissions, if the customer is student, the worker is faculty, and the admin staff is deans?
I am willing to have a vote, but we must move forward on this issue.
As far as the idea for the paper, thats’ fine too, but again, it brings a certain amount of complexity to a short run of words. [300] What would you assign to each team member to make your paper happen, as I have in the ‘Choose a theory, then choose one group out of the three, and apply your theory to that group in 300 words’ assignment? If you can provide this kind of proposal, we can vote on it, but we are running out of time for the planning.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I am asking for both,as a way of moving forward quickly.
I’m asking you to post your synopsis, and then to theorize about whether or not you see your particular theory applying to any group.
I am also saying that if you can make the leap to apply a theory (yours or any other) to a group as you might like to do in our paper, then you should feel free to do that as well.
So, 1) synopsis as assigned, and 2) potential applications to our groups of your assigned theory, and if not yours, possibly another one of our assigned theories.
This is dissemination and application in one post.
I wish we had been able to talk as a group.
John.
Thread:Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Post:Re: Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Good clarification – yes – the students would be the customer in our model.
John.
Thread:Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Post:Re: Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for the backup, Renee.
It’s approximately 300 words for each of us – not a lot really at all, but I think we all have a lot to say, so the simpler the model, the easier it will be for all of us to reign in word-consuming complexity.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Baby teeth. πŸ˜‰
j.
Thread:Motivation Theories – Let’s Share
Post:Re: Motivation Theories – Let’s Share
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We are doing this inside LGB as part of our planning. Christine DeFrehn has an absolutely fantastic synopsis of Herberg’s Two-Factor Theory at this post. Great work, Chris!
John.
Thread:STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Post:Re: STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim, Class, and LGB,
We are not progressing in a linear fashion, partially because of the different rates of participation and the pop-in and pop-out nature of online conversation. We are progressing forwards and backwards, but more fore than back, I think.
Some days we run a mile, and others we crawl a foot. Some days we slide back down the slope a bit. Some days we get over the hill. It’s a path.
We are finally starting to storm a bit which is nice, since it gets things done, but it is more effort than other stages. The storming is going very well, with small differences, and lots of agreement, but real conflict hasn’t hit, and may not. If it does, I’m confident that we’ll work through it.
I think that a team with a good structure and a plan could move forward in the event that a team member suddenly was lost, which is why I’ve been pushing and others have been helping to get our plan and outline established.
If we all had our script and our tasks set, we could work semi-independently, so that the effort and dance and timing involved in getting/coming together is more effective and productive.
If we have a plan, we can go away and still be working. Without a plan, we need to get together more frequently and work together. Not being able to get together slows down the plan. Not having a plan slows the work. Slowness kills productivity.
Let’s get that plan set! πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:WIKIPEDIA
Post:Re: WIKIPEDIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Wow – a zero for a mention?
What about an academic paper discussing the very issue of research using Wikipedia? Zero! What about an academic paper on the open source technology that is the basis of Wikipedia called MediaWiki, which is a valid and useful tool for sharing information, and can be locked down to give some insurance against anonymity, despite Wikipedia’s choice to embrace anonymity? Zero!
Not One-Zero-Zero, mind you, though the other words and thoughts in the paper might merit it.
I hope that this kind of targeted intolerance doesn’t happen, since if Wikipedia is censored, essentially, as a word, the question becomes which word is next?
It seems like a fearful response to a real problem that can be solved in other ways.
I can see not allowing citations from potentially biased sources, which is a list that might contain Wikipedia amongst a billion other URLs, but to suggest that a mention of any site name should determine the grade of any academic paper seems short sighted and prudent to a fault.
I respectfully would vote against any such measure at Rider University.
John.
Thread:WIKIPEDIA
Post:Re: WIKIPEDIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
If we had a delete button, we’d get rid of those Learning Group B posts, Tim, I’m sure.
In the mean time, know that none of these links will be used to support LGB’s paper.
LGB Leader LeMasney
Thread:W4AQ4 – SEMCO
Post:Re: W4AQ4 – SEMCO
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think some leaders are taught by their employees to be mistrustful. Resourceful or experienced leaders may be able to resist the temptation to lose generalized trust over a few breaches of trust.
More than once I’ve caught a worker in a lie, or cheating the organization by stealing or misusing resources, or overheard them talking badly and loudly about the job, myself, or others. Mediation tools like Inquiry and Dialogue and Presence might help in those situations in the future, but in the past, generally, it just bred mistrust.
Very recently, I found out that a student worker was taking stacks of hundreds of carefully designed, printed, and addressed evaluation forms out to be delivered, staying out for a few paid hours, simply throwing out the forms, and checking off the names from the delivery list. After getting very little response to a rather large survey, we were surprised to find out that many of the people we contacted on the list had not seen our survey. When the student was eventually confronted, he explained that some of the forms weren’t delivered, which turned into most, which turned into almost all. By the end, we were in shock, and the student was in tears. Explanation was impossible, and we essentially had to start from scratch, trust-wise, with this student.
It’s very hard to come away from that experience and still have unaltered trust. However, we gave the same job to another student worker with the same expectation that the task would be completed, which it was, which starts to rebuild that generalized trust.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Intrinsic rewards are great if you know where to look. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It seems like the intent of the organization and the actual reinforcement of the reward by your supervisor are out of sync. It’s possible that your supervisor doesn’t see the benefit of your benefit for themselves, which is sad and short sighted.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It would depend on one’s interpretation of fruit as reward, and the quality of the fruit in question, and the task or event that led to the fruit basket. In other words, so much of motivation has to be determined by the sense of reward by the recipient of the reward.
At our recent summer retreat, tickets were distributed for door prizes, and one of the prizes was a 2nd generation iPod shuffle, which everyone was excited about. It costs about $100, and is the size of a matchbook, but holds a GB of music. I got one last Christmas, and know how much fun they can be, but no one needs two of them.
As it turns out, I won the iPod, and no one was more surprised than me, but I have to say I was about 1/10th as grateful for it as anyone else who didn’t already have one might have been. I’ve been thinking about what to do about this, and have been searching for someone’s good behavior to stamp in with a shiny new iPod. As things stand right now, though, it will likely go to my wife, so we have a matching set. However, if I can think of someone who would genuinely see it as a reward and I see some team building behavior I want to motivate someone to repeat, the iPod is quite possibly theirs.
My point: if someone doesn’t see a reward as such, it’s not a reward, no matter how much you want it to be.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Here’s my union employee vs non union employee benefit:
Union employee is asked to do something outside of their job description and is not allowed to do it since it goes against union rules.
Non Union employee is asked to do something outside of their job description and ends up doing it since no rules prohibit it.
A simple but demotivating case, possibly for both workers. The Union worker may want to do the work, but is not allowed, and the non union worker may feel that it is out of their scope, but must do it anyway. This is especially telling if the nonunion worker must do the unwanted task as a result of the union worker’s refusal.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Can you specify in which ways you think it might be successfully applied [or even not very successfully] to either sales/admissions, workers/faculty, or admin. staff/deans?
I think that this connection may be a good basis for our individual assignments, and may give us all insights into the way the paper could be constructed.
Thanks for your very well written and beautifully crafted and edited piece here on Two-Factor Theory. It’s an enviable model for our task.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chadi did it already – all apologies!
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Thanks Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Chadi – you did it before I asked! Whoopsie.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine – you’re right.
Please feel free to share your synopsis here, and then choose to apply it, or another motivational theory if you wish, to one of the groups.
Did you like Herzberg’s Motivational-Hygiene Theory? How would you apply it to our University Model – which group would it work best at motivating if applied?
Chadi, can you also share your findings on your assigned motivational theory, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs? – You had said on 6/7:
“We could each pick a theory and β€œpost cited findings” as John suggested, by this weekend. If this is okay (and convenient) with the group, I will start gathering information about the first theory, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.”
Others may be interested to know what you found out to see how it might be applied, so please share here.
Thanks, and great work, all.
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Re: Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I love it – I will update our Google Docs outline to reflect your choice, and our current direction.
Please take a look at the Google Docs outline to see the current form of the paper, and give any feedback in the doc using your color.
Thanks, Chadi, for your quick turnaround on this!
John.
Thread:Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Post:Re: Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree with all of your points – we can definitely look at any group on campus – admissions, faculty, students, administrators, board members, anybody and make them take the role of ‘sales’ but given the complexity of the task at hand, that is, coordinating everyone’s thoughts into a cohesive whole, I’m trying to opt for the simplest analogy, which I would still argue as:
sales: admissions
workers: faculty
administrators: deans
I definitely agree that OIT could be salespeople, or groundskeeping could be salespeople, but in the strictest sense, such as selling a service directly for cash, admissions is likely the best analogy.
Although I think your connections are novel, and I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that we are all selling Rider, I’m pleading with your sense of simplicity to consider the basic nature of my premise as easier to analyze, and possibly, easier to write effectively about, since it would involve less shoehorning the role of OIT or groundskeeping into a sales position. It might be fun, but could also be needlessly difficult, since we would have to think of clever analogies and connections between technology or grass and profits.
I applaud your innovative thinking!
John.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks!
John.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Camera Shy
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Krewe!
We have 4 cats at home, all adopted. I would agree – if you need a friend in your life, think pet adoption first. There are so many!
j.
Thread:Happy Father’s Day Weekend
Post:Re: Happy Father’s Day Weekend
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Renee and Tim and all other well wishers. Fatherhood is by far the greatest thing that I ever experienced in my life, and it makes Father’s Day one of my favorites.
Happy Father’s Day to all who are celebrating!
John.
Thread:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Post:Please post your Theory Synopsis Here
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Please reply to this post with 1] a brief synopsis of your chosen Motivational Theory and 2] which of the three virtual organization groups [sales/admissions, workers/faculty, admin staff/admin staff] you see it applying practically to.
If you don’t see it fitting to a University at all, let us know. If you see it working with more than one group, let us know.
If you have citations, you may want to use them here, so we can reference them in Google Docs if we decide to use them.
We should have this information by next week [Sunday, 6/17] so that we can use it to start making choices about our organization and begin assigning writing tasks.
Please make every effort to complete this task – this research will help us make sensible choices about our sure-to-be-great paper!
John.
Thread:Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Post:Re: Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I wish we could talk in a chat forum to discuss these ideas a little quicker. At any rate…
I think that the University’s goal is clear – it’s to educate students. We could look at other aspects, such as providing employment for faculty, or giving the community a library resource, but generally speaking the product is education.
That being said, I think that the ‘sales’ team is likely admissions, selling the product of education to students.
Going further, I think the production workers who help students produce the product of education to the students are faculty.
Finally, we could see the administrative staff as the administrative staff – those who manage the day to day direction, systems, and running of the university. That includes areas like the registrar, the president, the deans and the provost. At Rider, this group would be referred to as the M4 group, and would include Mort, the Deans and the VPs, with occasional presence from the Board members.
While I am classified as an administrative staff member at Rider, I’m not seeing my own position in our virtual admin. staff group in our virtual organization. I think it might be kept to the high level decision makers, like a president, or a dean, or a VP, and it might be fun to analyze what motivates them vs. what motivates admissions.
Note that many groups aren’t present in our analysis, just like many groups in a traditional organization are missing from Tim’s requirement. For instance, there is no facilities or library or support staff mentioned in either our organizational analysis nor Tim’s requirement, but we could group them into administrative staff, if we had to wrench them in.
If we can agree to this basic premise, we can move on to applying specific theories to these groups (admissions, faculty, admin staff). If we need to specify different groups for Tim’s requirements, we need to do that before moving on to theoretical applications.
Let’s hash it out. I’d love to have this decided by this weekend, so that we can start writing next Monday at the latest.
John.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
A leader if ever I saw one. Thanks for sharing!
John.
Thread:3 page requirement
Post:Re: 3 page requirement
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Tim.
John.
Thread:3 page requirement
Post:3 page requirement
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
I see the requirement for three pages in the syllabus for the Influence of the Leader paper, and was wondering if it was a ‘grade altering’ requirement. I see that it’s bolded, I see that it is not likely a typo.
I’m asking: Will you take points off for a four page paper, for instance? If so, I’m wondering whether you’d take off more points for a four page paper, or a paper that was missing continuity or depth as a result of being chopped down to three pages? πŸ˜‰ I’m sure many here will have no trouble meeting both of those requirements, but for the clinically acutely verbose amongst us, this is an issue.
I certainly mean no disrespect – It’s clear what you asked for, I’m just asking for some clarification on the way you’ll interpret something besides what you asked for.
Wow that’s convoluted. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Post:Discussion from 06 14 07 john and chadi
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
[John LeMasney joined the session] Jun 14, 2007 7:00:32 PM EDT
John LeMasney: hi all.
[John LeMasney left the session]
[John LeMasney joined the session]
[Chadi Lewis joined the session]
John LeMasney: Hi, Chadi!
Chadi Lewis: Hi John
John LeMasney: I’m not sure who else is coming yet
Chadi Lewis: we could wait a minutes before discussing the topics . . .
John LeMasney: I just read that Carolyn can’t do it in the evening. Sure
John LeMasney: We’ll wait – I’ll be surprised if Renee doesn’t make it.
Chadi Lewis: okay
John LeMasney: Did you get a chance to look at my proposal in the thread?
Chadi Lewis: Our fictional organization is a university . . . would the setup be administrators, faculty, staff, and, students? yes i viewed your proposal
John LeMasney: k we can probably move forward, as our conversaztion will still remain for others to peruse.
John LeMasney: we could do it that way, with the various leaderships of each motivating their constituents, and some motivating everyone.
John LeMasney: I hadn’t thought of it that way – I was thinking more admissions/facilities/academic affairs/athletics, but I like your idea better.
John LeMasney: Also, Tim specifies some key things he wants representated, none of which are either of our org groups. Jun 14, 2007 7:10:27 PM EDT
John LeMasney: This fictitious organization has the following three types of employees: salespeople, production workers, and administrative staff.
Chadi Lewis: I like you setup because admission would be a great group to motivate
John LeMasney: sales could be admissions
John LeMasney: production could be staff
John LeMasney: admin could be admin staff.
John LeMasney: and customers is a no brainer. πŸ˜‰
John LeMasney: production are faculty, i guess, actually.
John LeMasney: I think that given his requirement, it’s a matter of finding those roles inside ‘our university’
John LeMasney: We could divide the paper into motivational approaches for the salespeople of the university (the admissions staff), the production workers, (the faculty) and the administrative staff (staff)
John LeMasney: two motivational theories could be applied to each, and the theories could be discussed in relation to the groups. Jun 14, 2007 7:15:39 PM EDT
John LeMasney: we might use the same ones for two or three, or different theories for all of them.
John LeMasney: your thoughts?
Chadi Lewis: The hierarchy of need and erg would be great theories for the admission group
John LeMasney: I agree.
Chadi Lewis: I apologize in advance but I am a slow writer
John LeMasney: no apology necessary.
John LeMasney: I type faster than I think, which is bad. πŸ˜‰
John LeMasney: Would you mind if I posted our conversation in the boards when we’re finished?
Chadi Lewis: Should we use all the theories provided and limit ourselves?
John LeMasney: we don’t need to – we can use some of the provided theories and use others outside of this list if we wish.
John LeMasney: or we can use just some of the provided theories. the limit might be good.
Chadi Lewis: posting is a great idea
John LeMasney: Good – I will make sure to copy and paste our conversation there.
Chadi Lewis: Should we create and outline . . . Jun 14, 2007 7:20:39 PM EDT
Chadi Lewis: Should we create an outline . . .
John LeMasney: I think that we might each take one theory and one group each, and write 300 words about it – that way we’ll have the three groups represented and well theorized, and everyone will have a part.
John LeMasney: yes – an outline will be a necessary part of our paper, in my opinion.
John LeMasney: We can start that right now, if you like in Google Docs.
John LeMasney: I meant “like, in”
Chadi Lewis: πŸ™‚ Okay . . . I will log into Google docs now
John LeMasney: me too.
John LeMasney: I’m there.
John LeMasney: You can see I put an outline there, but it was just a placeholder.
John LeMasney: Now I’m starting to craft our plan. Jun 14, 2007 7:25:15 PM EDT
Chadi Lewis: Your format is good. I could start working on the theory for the admission group . . . or do you want to work on the group? John LeMasney: As I said – I think we can all choose 1 group and 1 theory, and amongst the six of us, we’ll have a great paper.
John LeMasney: I think I may take admin staff, since that is my role at Rider.
Chadi Lewis: okay
John LeMasney: I am not quite as versed in all of the motivational theories yet, and so, I’m not sure which I’d apply to it, but I like Y Theory.
John LeMasney: Where a democratic approach is applied.
John LeMasney: Which Theory of the two you chose would you apply?
Chadi Lewis: I also like the Y and ERG theories . . . I would apply the erg Jun 14, 2007 7:31:15 PM EDT
John LeMasney: k – take a look at the outline for what I’m envisioning
Chadi Lewis: I do apologize, but I have to step away for a few.
John LeMasney: No problem – should I wait?
Chadi Lewis: You do not have to wait . . . when I return I will work on the group & theory. If you log onto Google docs later please provide input.
John LeMasney: Great – thanks, Chadi – I’ll talk to you later!
Chadi Lewis: thanks john for all your hard work:)
Chadi Lewis: bye
[Chadi Lewis left the session] Jun 14, 2007 7:39:32 PM EDT
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Wow. That’s so 1984. Scary!
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
What would work better for you?
John.
Thread:STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Post:Re: STAGES OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I would say that learning group B is still in a norming stage to some degree, but have touched on some other stages. Because of the limited time and the accelerated format, I think we’ve agreed that there’s not enough time to argue, and so proposals have been pretty smoothly debated. We did a little of the ‘yay team’ stuff, and went quickly into deciding meeting times, tools, and are now working out responsibilities.
In the effort of ‘norming’, just last night after feeling comfortable as acting moderator/submitter, I put forth a proposal for how we might accomplish our goals. This proposal [the thread is named proposal…] may be our first real opportunity for storming, but it may just be a shower. πŸ˜‰
One thing that has helped has been offering a ‘voting block’ for each decision, and creating a new thread for each question, so as to keep the tally easy to find. If democracy worked for Semco, it can work for us. In our group, we used a voting block to determine our organization, our collaboration tool, our ‘leader’, our chat tool, our meeting time, and the proposal mentioned above.
An example would be:
Do you like the voting block idea?
John – yes
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Carolyn – yes
Chadi – yes
Christine – ?
and people cut and paste, then update the tally in their reply.
We’re all connected and engaged at this point, and once we have some real-time chat, it should go a bit quicker.
John.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Fingers are firmly crossed. πŸ˜‰
j.
Thread:proposal: methods rights and responsibilities
Post:proposal: methods rights and responsibilities
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’ve been thinking about how we can go about writing this paper as a team, respectfully, and it really comes down to methods, rights, and responsibilities.
I see a system where we:
– commit to an outline that we devise collaboratively complete with section titles and major points to be proven
– work on the introduction collaboratively after the outline is done
– each are responsible for a certain number of citations in support of our ideas, like 5 or more.
– each are responsible for a certain number of words that make up a section or sections we agree on in the outline and divvy up like 1800/6 = 300 words each plus intro and conclusion to finish at 2100 words.
– work on the conclusion collaboratively after all sections are done.
– commit to showing some amount of progress at least every day on our respective 300 word portions in the Google Doc – 60 words per workday.
– Agree to leave each other’s sections completely alone until we leave a comment in the document requesting comments from others.
– All agree to submitting the paper by voting ‘yes’ on each ‘finished’ section.
Request for comments on proposal:
Carolyn – ?
Christine – ?
Chadi – ?
John – I made this proposal, but if I wanted to say something in protest – I might write it here. This is all up for debate and should reflect your working style!
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Decided Items
Post:Decided Items
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that we are in agreement about a few things:
We will be using a University as our org.
We will use Google Docs to record our planning and collaboratively edit portions of the paper and collect citations, etc.
We will try to use Bb Virtual Classroom as a way to chat, and if need be will move to other venues, such as skype, AOLIM, or some other tool.
I will try to be present in BbVC most nights at 7 pm, though since I am on vacation next week, that may not continue very long. Any who wish to join me certainly may.
We each have a Theory, some of us have chosen the mandated ones, and Robert will be sharing his shortly.
I am acting leader, which as far as I know means that I will prepare and submit the doc to Tim, help to motivate, help to mediate any issues that arise, and help to organize, delegate, and complete tasks if necessary. I am willing to share or give up any or all of this role in the interest of fairness or success.
Open items or new issues will get new threads, and should use the ‘voting block’ used in many of the threads already. When you vote, please copy and paste the block to show the latest tally.
Let’s do this thing. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Theory
Post:Re: Theory
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
You might want to add some of that, like the outline, to our GDoc, which I just sent you a new invite to.
Make sure to choose a color to differentiate yourself.
Thanks!
John.
Thread:Apology
Post:Re: Apology
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We had no doubt it was something extraordinary Robert – we’re thrilled to see you, and glad we’ll be moving forward together.
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks so much for checking in, Robert – if you can make it at 7 tomorrow [Thurs], that’s great. We had a rough first try tonight [Wed]. You’ll be able to see the transactions afterwards, regardless, like you can right now, even if you can’t make it at 7.
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’ll send you a specific invite to macauleyr@rider.edu – if you already have a gmail account or something else you’d prefer I send the invite to additionally, I can.
Thanks, Robert.
John.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Going to OCNJ all next week, and can not wait. Ours is also a yearly trip. What a great, fun, safe place.
j.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I am all over that place, Kieanna – if you see me, stop me! πŸ˜‰
j.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I was in there [Bb Virtual Classroom] tonight with Renee, but I didn’t see her, but I have no idea why. It wasn’t until I logged out and back in that I saw that she had been there.
I appreciate the effort, and I’ll be more vigilant about checking to make sure I’m typing every few minutes to make sure I’m still connected.
My apologies.
John.
Thread:Week 4A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 4A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I feel like I want to try and implement a lot of what Semler did .
I’d like to try to flatten or circularize my own organization’s hierarchy.
I’d like to invite all members of every team to be present at any meeting they wish, including the OIT director’s meetings, which are without a doubt where the most important information is distributed, and only 5 people get to hear it directly.
I’d like to see our pay reflect our efforts.
I’d like to see all of our documents reduced to one page or less.
I’d like to see more people taking charge of their own work, and less hiding behind executive assistants. I’d like to see executive assistants get jobs that are more rewarding, challenging, and motivating than they are.
I would like to see a lot more democratic approaches to decision making. The only people who have a voice are those lucky enough to be invited to the right meeting.
I would like to see hirings, promotions, firings, and moves be a group decision, or at least a decision of the affected group.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Oh, no.
It depends on your status as an employee, for one thing. As an administrative employee, I don’t have anything like comp time or overtime. If I work 60 hours, I get paid for 37.5, which is a whole separate story. The closing occurs on Fridays, not on Wednesdays, so if I were to leave at 12 on Wednesday, it would be vacation for me. No matter if I stay until 6 pm on Friday, which I love to do, since there is no better time to get work done, I will be considered as having gone home at 12, since technically, the university is closed.
There are plenty of benefits for someone in my position – 4 weeks vacation plus holidays, sick time, health insurance, tuition remission for me and my family, a stable position, a solid salary with regular increases, TIAA CREF, half day fridays, flex time, employee assistance, free university events, and plenty of benefits that are purely personal – a relaxed work atmosphere, a focus on getting work done rather than punching a timeclock, an appreciation of creativity, and more.
I’m just saying that everyone in my position, no matter their effort or ethic, gets those perks. I think I’m very willing to live with that, but sometimes, it’s hard to watch others languish without languishing yourself.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee says “Why would anyone care if the evaluations didn’t make any difference in whether they were compensated with any kind of reward or punishment as the case may be, once the evaluations were complete?”
Exactly. That being said, the PDP can be used to build a case, albeit slowly, against a wayward employee. The whole idea is that an employee may get some verbal warnings over the year, may visit with HR or their supervisor for a correctional sit down, etc., and those things may be reflected in the PDP commentary. Then, the goal setting portion describes in detail what could be done to become ‘satisfactory’ again, so that over the year, things can improve. If the goals are not accomplished or satisfactorily completed over the next year, or if more HR and supervisory action is taken, the PDP can be used in conjunction with other paperwork and reports to possibly eject the employee. In the cases where I’ve seen employees ejected, the PDP was not at the center of the argument, but played a peripheral role.
It does a mediocre job of providing teeth, but it is particularly good at setting goals. What it’s not very good at is properly rewarding a hard working employee, or giving the employee a proper voice in giving goals to their supervisor. At best it gives the ability to reject the appraisal, but not give one of their own.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We have clique issues here. In fact there’s a little bit of a test we use when we want to know if something should be done at an office party or a group function called the “[name witheld] test”, where we try to imagine the reaction of a particular clique of people to an idea, and based on the assumed reaction, the idea is further considered or not.
The funny thing is that the members of the clique are not in either a leadership role, nor a strong titled position – it’s just that the potential backlash from them complaining about something to the president’s office or HR or their director isn’t worth the effort of trying to do something that might be fun or different or alternative in nature.
For instance, at the twice a year office party, some people might like to play video games on a game console that someone would be willing to bring in and set up, but the idea did not pass the [name withheld] test, despite various options in which the clique members would neither hear nor see the games, but might be offended at the thought of some org members playing in their general vicinity. It’s a valid concern, as some might be legitimately offended, somehow.
I’m not sure this is 100% on topic, but when cliques were mentioned, I thought I’d share.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
A union worker jealous of a non-union worker. That’s something I thought I’d never hear. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Chris. I just added your vote to the tally in the ‘choosing a chat’ thread.
I think we might be there – I just have to confirm with Renee.
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
As per Christine’s latest post, see updated tally below. I’ll be in there at 7, in case anyone wants to play around in chat.
Carolyn – ?
Christine – Bb virtual Classroom
Chadi – Bb virtual Classroom
John – Bb Virtual Classroom
Renee – Skype
Robert – ?
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Re: Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m glad you did this, Renee – it’s a small gesture with a big impact. Thanks.
I’m sharing a picture of myself with my boy Jack.
John.
Thread:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Post:Getting To Know Each Other Better!
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim and Class,
I saw Shawn Clarida Friday this past week and told him it was nice to see him in class. My husband and another mutual friend of Shawn’s and mine wasn’t sure he was still taking classes. I told them I was sure I saw him here in Blackboard or his name that is.
Then it hit me. Wouldn’t it be nice if we all did what John LeMasney did in his intro and posted our pictures. So, with that said I decided I would start this thread to say hello with my picture so people can see what I and anyone else in class who would like to add an attached photo looked like. So, I hope you join me in introducing ourselves with photos of who we are so we can place faces with the names and personalities we are discovering each day. The picture I am attaching has me and my husband Robert in it from our church. It is the only one I have on this computer and the most recent.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It seems like there might be other ways to do this without it seeming like a threat to your organization. Conflict resolution tools anyone? πŸ˜‰
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:University is our organization choice.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think it’s settled.
I have been trying to get in touch with Robert, but I haven’t heard anything. I think he may be taking a back seat role in our decision making process, which I think is fine, now that we know.
Robert, if you’re out there, show us a sign! πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Renee – I’m glad to hear it, and I agree.
John.
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks!
j.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It sounds like you’ll be okay with taking a back seat in decision making. Maybe we will use the chat meetings to make some decisions and come back with assignments. Would that be alright with you?
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn – I was suggesting that we might have an open nightly meeting at 7 pm over Bb Virtual Classroom – would that work for you sometimes? [obviously you’ll be quite busy over the next few days]
John.
Thread:Choosing a leader
Post:Re: Choosing a leader
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Carolyn!
John.
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:Hoelzle, Carolyn
Date:Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Organization suggestions:
Carolyn – University
Christine – University
Chadi – University
John – University
Renee – University
Robert – ?
Sounds good to me!
Thread:W4AQ4 – SEMCO
Post:Re: W4AQ4 – SEMCO
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It seems like Semler used a mixture of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards systems to motivate employees.
Intrinsically speaking, I think the employees felt satisfied in the way that they were able to have a say, feel ownership, and direct the company in a hold-the-reins manner. Because of the democratic way in which most decisions were made, and the relatively flat structure of the circular hierarchy, everyone felt empowered in the company, which is something I think many would give up a lot of pay for: to have a real say in the matter of their business.
Extrinsically speaking, I feel like the employees were able to feel properly compensated. They were able to choose their own salaries, and the salaries of most employees were of public record. The counterpoint of these ideas gives one the freedom to choose their own price, the ability to compare their value to others, and the ability to adjust your income appropriately so as to not stick out.
The mixture of the democratic decision making, personal ownership of decisions, and the transparency of the monetary and other transactions in the company provided just the right checks and balances to allow everyone to feel rewarded appropriately.
John.
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi Team,
Organization suggestions:
Carolyn – ?
Christine – University
Chadi – University
John – University
Renee – University
Robert – ?
I am agreeing with the university idea, even though I don’t work at a university currently, I have in the past worked in the Registrar’s Office of Charleston Southern University and we used to be the Faculty-in-Residence, working for Residence Life, here at Rider for 4 years. So, I think I can contribute with that idea for our organization.
I think it a benefit that we can put our experiences in the paper. Although I like to learn about other organizations, this course is running at super speed so we need to take advantage of our knowledge in this kind of organization, rather than having to research a whole different type…in my opinion.
Kindest Regards,
Renee
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
By the way – anyone can try the virtual classroom right now – go into communications, then collaboration, then click on ‘join’ next to Lecture Hall/Virtual Classroom. A window should pop up with the chat in it. You may instead have a prompt to ‘click here for an accessible version’ which you can click to get the pop up.
If anyone has questions, I can help.
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
So noted re: Skype – see latest updated vote tally below. Google Docs is a go, as we are almost all in there now. Again – anyone heard from Robert?
Carolyn – ?
Christine – ?
Chadi – Bb virtual Classroom
John – Bb Virtual Classroom
Renee – Skype
Robert – ?
j.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Renee!
While I haven’t heard from everyone on the matter, I am now actively trying to coordinate our actions, and I appreciate your continued support. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Choosing a leader
Post:Re: Choosing a leader
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I appreciate your votes, and am now considering myself acting collector and submitter. As you might have guessed, I consider all of us as equals in this endeavor, and hope to simply be a centralized resource, a voice for all of us to Tim and a mediator for any issues that might arise.
Thanks again for your support!
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m thinking that an hour would be useful.
I think that maybe we could consider having a regular meeting at 7 or 8 pm each night until we are finished where any who wanted to or were available could attend. Since it would be recorded if we used Bb virtual classroom, any who wished to see what transpired could do so.
I’m going to start going into the virtual classroom at 7 pm each night for the next weeks. Any who wish to join me should feel free. If other times are typically better, I’m willing to change the time.
Hoping to see you!
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
We are not able to limit to just our group members in the course virtual classroom, though that is possible using the ‘group pages’ function which Tim has elected not to use, and whose setup would be required.
At any rate, I don’t think that we’d be getting together at the same time as anyone else, nor would we be discussing anything ‘secretive’ and so I’m not sure that it makes a difference. πŸ˜‰
I’m all for using the virtual classroom, and I’ve noted our votes, including Renee’s vote for Skype in the thread called “choosing a chat client”. I’ve dropped AOLIM from my vote, though others may want to vote for it.
I like Skype, too, but I feel like we’re stretching the bounds of people’s comfort at this point. If we can use a tool like virtual classroom, at least we’re somewhat familiar with the technology. If voice is really necessary, we may have to use skype anyway.
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn – ?
Christine – ?
Chadi – Bb Virtual Classroom
John – Bb Virtual Classroom
Renee – Skype
Robert – ?
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Explaining myself isn’t going to make my joke any better.
j.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: Choosing a Chat Client
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn – ?
Christine – ?
Chadi – ?
John – AIM or Bb Virtual Classroom
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’ve just verified that GTalk does not allow for multiple people to chat simultaneously, so we should choose an alternative.
There’s the Virtual Classroom in Blackboard, available in the Communication section.
There’s also AOL Instant Messenger, which allows for spontaneous chat room creation.
Since the Bb virtual classroom can create an archive, we might want to use that. It also has a whiteboard, where we could all visit a web site at the same time.
AOL IM is pretty ubiquitous though – most of us probably already have an account, yes?
John.
Thread:W4AQ3 – Competitive Advantage
Post:Re: learning group B
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Sorry, all, for off topic post here.
Hi, Robert – hoping to see you in our learning group thread soon. We’ve been trying to lock down some decisions and would love your input.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Karen said “Motivation has to be driven by an inner quality that an employee might have for competence and self esteem”
If this is true, we’re in the right place. πŸ˜‰ Intrinsic value. This is the reason I love my job, but when I see others around me unmotivated and unwilling to change, I think that it might help to have something to help motivate them extrinsically.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m not sure what specifically you’re asking about being a deep part of Rider culture. I think we like half day Fridays. I can only speak for myself.
When you say “I came away with the fact that Rider employees fall in line with the process because if you were to fall out there would be little change.” I am not sure which process you are referring to. Many Rider employees do things well because it makes them feel good about their job, as far as I can tell, since not doing it well has very little consequence, especially when the job gets done regardless. This is a problem.
The half day Fridays were put in place supposedly, as I understand it, (clarification is welcome), so that facilities could save money and the environment by shutting down air conditioning, having less machinery running, etc on the campuses. I never quite got why we got such a great facilities or environmental benefit from a difference of four hours. I don’t think it was originally billed as a ‘perk’. In the last announcement of these, in a statement from the President that approves the half days, it was described as a way for Rider employees to spend more time with their families, etc.
Many of us feel squeezed a little bit since we lose a half day of work time, but none of us want to stay and work when everyone else is asked to go home. Some of us stay anyway, because some issues can’t wait. No matter your work ethic, no one wants to see a fool in the mirror – the fool who works for no extra money no extra recognition, since your boss and their boss already went home.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine,
I can say that I hadn’t really considered the benefit of the tuition remission until the right program came along, and I might never have began had it not. After I finish the program, I will likely feel a stronger connection with Rider, obviously, but I doubt that I will resent the program, since the benefit is latent. I could always do another Rider program, also. I couldn’t image anyone who could single handedly gather all of Rider’s degrees. πŸ˜‰
But I still feel that since it is available to all employees, it is not an incentive to work progressively harder or innovate in any way. We are compensated, but not in any competitive way, and not to improve our performance, but to keep us from quitting, which seems short sighted.
John.
Thread:WIKIPEDIA
Post:Re: WIKIPEDIA
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
You all might know about Comedy Central’s Stephen Colbert being banned from Wikipedia, but it underlines Tim’s idea that it is unreliable as an academic source.
McCarthy (2006) tells the story at http://news.com.com/8301-10784_3-6100754-7.html which reads in part:
Late-night TV personality Stephen Colbert claims he has no qualms with Wikipedia. “I love Wikipedia,” he said during the July 31 episode of his Comedy Central show “The Colbert Report,” adding that “any site that’s got a longer entry on ‘truthiness’ than on Lutherans has its priorities straight.” Colbert, a comedian who masks as a Bill O’Reilly-esque blowhard on TV, found the free-for-all encyclopedia to be a perfect fit for his fact-despising, spin-loving character. “You see, any user can change any entry, and if enough other users agree with them, it becomes true,” he explained, proceeding to eradicate all references to George Washington owning slaves.”
Needless to say, it is a highly manipulable and flexible resource that should not be used under any circumstances for academic citations. That being said, we have been using it to begin helping to define [as one of many definitions] the motivational theories for our group paper, since it often refers to more stringently edited resources and citations. Of course, we won’t be using any of those pieces of information in the paper, lest Tim be worried.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Oh, yeah – there’s also summer half day fridays – where we get fully compensated as though we were there on Fridays in the summer, but we go home at 12. Of course, there’s flex time too, where our day’s reduced but our pay isn’t. And we get to dress down in the summer for the most part. Thanks to Tashira in a recent post in the competitive advantage thread for pointing out some things brought up to boost morale.
Those we have, but we ALL have them, whether we work hard or not. The guy who does no extra work at all goes home at 11:59 on Friday and the guy who stays until 1 pm on Friday to get that last job finished got nothing extra for his effort. In fact, he lost out a little.
John.
Thread:W4AQ3 – Competitive Advantage
Post:Re: W4AQ3 – Competitive Advantage
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
If compensation was variable due to yearly reviews, people might work harder.
If a great PDP meant that I might get a few hundred more dollars a month, I would be more apt to keep up that kind of performance indefinitely, working for better and better PDPs, focusing on goals, scoring a 90 average on my 360 reviews [which we don’t have yet].
If compensation at Rider was comparable to compensation at a non-academic position, it might pull a new pool of skilled and remarkable workers into the fold.
I myself have had the unique experience of calling on people for a job offer who did nothing short of hanging up on me when they found out what we were offering for salary.
If Rider made revolutionary breakthroughs on compensation, people might come from other leading institutions, bringing their experience, leadership, and methods for market dominance to Rider, and work towards their goals so that they can get increases on their already great compensation.
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m with Terri,
As I’ve said here many times, I like the PDP as a tool for direction, feedback, and job definition, but since there continues to be no monetary consequence to it, I feel like so many simply ignore it, and that it has no teeth, especially for those having the best and worst work ethics. It won’t reward the hard workers and it won’t demand anything more from the slackers.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
There’s also the TIAA Cref benefit, where we get a 7% employer match. But again, the income from it is not directly related to performance.
Er, well, not our performance, anyway. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I feel like if I was in the union, I might feel like I had some part in the increases, but as it is, I just get to sit and wait for the cash to roll in. It’s quite unfair to those inside and outside of the union, really.
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chris says:
While everyone is certainly happy to receive a raise each year, there are some employees who receive a raise whose work ethic, qualilty of work, etc., are not consistent with the mission of the organization. On the other hand, there are many employees who go above and beyond and give 120% every day, who get the exact same raise as those whose work does not manifest the mission or culture of the organization.
I agree so wholeheartedly with this. Since we will all get an increase every year, and it will likely be juicy, since the unions fought so hard for it, where is the reason for the failing worker to improve or the stellar worker to sustain their performance? The PDP has no influence on income, and no matter what the increase, no one’s going to go down in salary, so what makes those at the extremes change for the better? What makes those in the middle move in any direction at all?
John.
Thread:W4AQ2 – Consequences
Post:Re: W4AQ2 – Consequences
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
The intended consequences of the incentive and pay systems is that people feel confident that they will be able to keep their jobs, and that their jobs will be able to sustainable pay them a reasonable amount, and that the amount will not likely ever go down, but will rather likely go up over time, due to across the board increases. There is a safe feeling amongst workers due to these likelihoods.
The unintended consequences of the incentive and pay systems is that people are tempted to leave and go to other employers, taking valuable skills and experience away with them. People often feel overworked and unrewarded for the overwork, since there is no recognition in terms of a monetary award. The people who happen to not only value hard work but also proper recompense quickly move out of the employ of the University, or look elsewhere for employment, since it is assumed that money is not the highest levels of motivational value for university workers.
Our organization’s mission is clearly defined in the Strategic Plan – the behaviors defined in the Strategic Plan are reinforced by people interested in intrinsic rewards, those who have synergy with the President, who wish for the University to succeed, who want to do a good job, who want to be proud of what they do, but there is not structure for reinforcement via extrinsic rewards, as far as I can tell.
Sour, isn’t it?
John.
Thread:W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Post:Re: W4AQ1 – Assumptions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
My organization has certain issues regarding rewards: As a technology worker at a University, I am often expected to accept that I will receive a lower wage than I would with precisely the same experience and responsibilities in another industry. Moving to another position in business might gain me a 25%-50% increase in salary. I will take this lower wage happily, in their view, because I do not have the same bottom line based pressures that I might in another industry. How much money is brought into the University is seldom a concern for my area – in fact, as long as no one is screaming about their various technology items not working, there is very little reason for performance to increase, unless you are self-motivated. I consider myself to be very self-motivated. Our customers are typically internal, and since there is no direct exchange of cash between us, and we are paid whether we work like mad or sit quietly waiting, we are lulled into getting a paycheck and giving the same level of service or less, week after week.
Our organization has a set view of rewards for employees, and it is deeply ingrained.
The only way for an employee in my position to get an increase is to:
a] wait for the faculty union, of which I am not a part, to fight for one, which almost always is mirrored in staff salary increases. This happens without fail.
b] get a distinguished PDP, which is usually reserved for those who ‘save the University a large sum of money’ an oft repeated phrase which is so vague that it makes it hard for someone to gather the motivation to achieve it, more so since the result is not a sustained increase, but rather a one-time gift certificate of some sort, for some amount, TBD.
c] change positions to a higher ranking position, which in my case is nearly impossible if I want to stay in OIT, since there is only one person above me in the technology organization, and she likes her job.
I’ve said before that I’m happy doing what I’m doing, and it’s a good thing because a) the pay is not fantastic, and b) there’s no where else for me to go in our pyramid.
John.
Thread:The Assignment
Post:Re: The Assignment
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim added this for clarification in ‘important announcements’:
To develop this project, it would make sense to: 1) research and understand popular motivational theories; 2) develop your fictitious organization, while introducing the functions within (e.g., sales, production workers, and administrative staff), and the goal/objectives of that function within your organization; and 3) apply the motivational theory that your team would be most effective at motivating that group or team of organizational workers. Don’t forget to justify your reasoning about why the selected motivational theory most aptly fits the said function.
I hope this hint helps, in the way your learning team approaches the assignment. Once again, the [preceding post] describes the expectations of the assignment:
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
motivation theory responsibilities:
Carolyn – ERG (Aldefer)
Christine – Herzberg’s Two-Factor Theory
Chadi – Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
John – Vroom’s Expectancy Theory
Renee – Equity Theory (Adams)
Robert – ?
Thread:Choosing a leader
Post:Re: Choosing a leader
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Leader suggestions:
Carolyn – ?
Christine – John
Chadi – ?
John – Renee
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It looks like we have some momentum, but I’m wondering about the rest of our team. In fact, has anyone heard from Robert at all?
I really like Chadi’s voting block from the meeting time, and I think we could use it whenever we are updating a vote, so that there’s a running tally, like this:
Organization suggestions:
Carolyn – ?
Christine – University
Chadi – University
John – University
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn – ?
Christine – Thurs. evening anytime after 5:30 pm
Chadi – This Wednesday at 7:00pm eastern
John – This Wednesday at 7:00pm eastern or Thurs. evening anytime after 5:30 pm
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Carolyn – ?
Christine – Thurs. evening anytime after 5:30 pm
Chadi – This Wednesday at 7:00pm eastern
John – This Wednesday at 7:00pm eastern
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
That’s great – I hope that others in our group will be interested in pursuing this too!
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Chadi!
I would only clarify one point: We [may] want to use Google Talk [a real time chat client ala aol instant messenger] for communication and we are using Google Docs and Spreadsheets [a collaborative workspace] for collaborative writing and planning.
GDS does not have a built in chat ability on the Docs side, though it does on the Spreadsheet side. Regardless, we can use GTalk.
I will be happy to practice with anyone who wants to try it out – I have just sent eveyone who has signed up so far in GDS an invite to use gtalk.
You can use the same emails/usernames people are using in Google Docs and Spreadsheets to connect to them on gtalk. Also, all of the conversations are recorded [text] so that we can submit the conversations to Tim if he wishes to see them.
http://www.google.com/talk/
http://docs.google.com/
Carolyn – ?
Christine – ?
Chadi – This Wednesday at 7:00pm eastern
John – This Wednesday at 7:00pm eastern
Renee – ?
Robert – ?
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m fine to use a university as our organization. Not only are some of us familiar with different parts of the whole, but I think we can all learn regardless..
As an aside, in the fall I was in a group and we had to design an organization (different assignment). We made up one and that worked just fine also.
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:Lewis, Chadi
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I also work at a University. This type of organization would give me (and other members of the group) a personal point of view.
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Re: Choosing an organization – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I believe that applying real world experience may give us some insights into the imagined organization. Christine and I (and others here) both work at a University, and I’d like to make our organization a University. I’m not sure if Christine or anyone else agrees. πŸ˜‰
Do any of you belong to organizations that might be good models for the imagined organization for our paper?
Do any of you want to do a University as the organization?
Does anyone feel that choosing something outside of our own real life experiences may give us a unique perspective, without bias we might have accumulated?
What would you all like to do for our organization?
John.
Thread:Choosing an organization.
Post:Choosing an organization.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Let’s throw out our ideas for what we might like to use as our example organization. I’ll reply with my suggestion.
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It sounds like Carolyn wants ERG. Let’s make it so.
John.
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
There are alternate motivational theories that Tim said we could look at – after the last mandated one is taken the remaining person can choose one they like.
Also, since it is just a matter of research, since Tim clarified that not all of these will work with our imaginary organization well, we could all do some cross research on all of these eventually.
I will make a new thread to talk about possibilities for our faux organization.
John.
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Re: time for Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’ve not tried gtalk audio with more than one person, but I think it may be limited to two at a time. We could use the text based version of gtalk to have everyone get together, or another chat tool. We could also use Blackboard’s built in Virtual Classroom in the Communications section.
Can we talk about a time that would be good for everyone?
I’m fairly open right now. Any evening at 6 pm eastern would work for me, but other times are available.
Thread:Choosing a leader
Post:Re: Choosing a leader
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’d like to volunteer Renee, though I’ll be happy to take the role depending on the outcome of the vote.
That said, I appreciate your support, Christine. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
You’re in there, Chadi. I’ve made changes that Renee may not have seen, but you’ve been in there for a while.
If you still have questions can you give me a call at your convenience? 609 869 5000 x7145 or tell me when and where it would be good to call.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I figured it out. I heart name dot name email addresses.
John.
Thread:PAPERS #2
Post:Re: PAPERS #2
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 11, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, and happy birthday, Tim and Joe.
John.
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Sunday, June 10, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John and Team,
We have 5 theories and 6 people. So, what is the 6th person going to do?
Theories:
a. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
b. ERG (Aldefer)
c. Two-Factor Theory (Herzberg)
d. Equity Theory (Adams)
e. Expectancy Theory (Vroom)
Team B:
1. De Frehn, Christine
2. Hoelzle, Carolyn
3. Lackie, Cynthia
4. LeMasney, John
5. Lewis, Chadi
6. MacAuley, Robert
The last one left is:
On ERG [existence needs (physical well-being); relatedness needs (satisfactory relations with others); growth needs (development of competence and realization of potential)](Aldefer)
Robert or Carolyn still need one each. So what do we do with that team?
Kindest Regards,
Renee
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee has chosen Equity Theory.
Thread:Week 3B Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 3B Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Some new developments in OIT at Rider:
Our second OIT Thursday Round Table took place – the question was “If you could do any other job in OIT besides your own, what would it be, and why?”
Some interesting and surprising answers have led to some cross training opportunities and opened doors for new work relationships to happen. More than one person said, (after the council was over, in which you are not allowed to respond, out of respect for listening,) that they were surprised at those who were interested in working in their role instead of one’s own. Things are starting to happen, to the surprise of many in the dept.
HR got back to me about 360 reviews, and said that there are plans to integrate exactly this sort of feedback in upcoming revisions to the PDP, and that the emphasis right now is on getting higher completion rates. Exciting!
I have been thinking about other ways to integrate some of what we’ve been learning about, and I intend to change some of our training sessions to be less about ‘presentation/Q&A’ next semester, and more about dialogue, bridging, inquiry, and innovations.
I have also been putting a bug into the ears of those around me about the idea of having a situation in OIT where anyone who needed help with any system could speak with any of us and expect to get the help they need. Right now, if you need help with Blackboard, you need to talk with me or my staff, and if you need help with email, you need to talk with someone else. This is not because I am the only one who can understand the admin tasks in Blackboard, or that I don’t know how to resolve email issues, but rather because there are walls keeping us from helping each others’ customers.
If I have my way, those walls will come down.
Thanks for another great week, all.
John.
Thread:W3BQ3 – Semler
Post:Re: W3BQ3 – Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Semler led and motivated cross-functionally by addressing the needs of his subordinates, allowing a democratic approach to decision making in the company, allowing for insubordination, protest, and strikes to give workers the voice to get what they wanted and needed to be motivated in their work. Semler united his team by taking their common goals, such as increasing profit shares, and using it to reinforce the positive work ethic of the workers. He allowed democratic methods to be used wherever possible, because he knew that if the majority was for an idea, then they would take ownership of it, which made them feel invested in it. If everyone wants the company to succeed, it is more likely to succeed. If everyone is fully invested in the company, it is in the interest of the workers to help it succeed. If instead, decisions come from on high, the workers feel like their voice isn’t being heard, and they are just following orders, which creates a situation where instead of helping the company to grow and improve which requires the workers to have a voice, they end up just mindlessly doing a job, picking up the paychecks, and not putting anything back in.
John.
Thread:Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Post:Re: Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
“If everyone would just do their jobs and not worry about titles and status everything would be much easier.”(York-Funchers, 2007)
Quote of the week.
John.
Thread:Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Post:Re: Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I would definitely see why it would be hard – working through conflicts is seldom easy, right? πŸ˜‰
If leadership was easy everybody would be doing it. If leadership was a birthright, none of us would be in this class. I’m sure you’ll do what it takes to get to the common ground with your co-workers.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
The reply from HR actually referenced 360 evaluations, and it looks like they are already thinking of ways to implement them in next years PDP. Yay, HR!
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I started a new thread below called ‘Responsibilities for motivational theories’ where I thought we could decide who would be responsible for what. I added the choices people already made in this thread, and added my own to that thread. My reasoning is that the more we break out ideas into separate threads, the less we’ll have to hunt and peck for them in one big thread. I’m trying to make the best use of the subject line in each thread too.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for the backup, Renee – right now there are 5 us us either invited to edit or already editing the doc.
I think we may be there.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Renee,
Actually, I used an alternate method of invite – I put a link in this thread, and when one clicks on it they ‘ask’ for access.
Regardless, I just sent you, specifically, a link, though it refers to you as ‘Mitch’ Lackie. Are you sure it’s just ‘lackie@gmail.com’?
John.
Thread:Friday Night
Post:Re: Friday Night
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Ayyyyyyyyyy! My warmest congratulations!
John.
Thread:Friday Night
Post:Friday Night
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hope you all are enjoying this absolutely beautiful weekend in NJ, or that it’s beautiful wherever you are.
John.
Thread:Links for research
Post:Re: Victor Vroom Homepage at Yale
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
http://mba.yale.edu/faculty/profiles/vroom.shtml
Thread:Links for research
Post:Re: expectancy Theory
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
http://www.valuebasedmanagement.net/methods_vroom_expectancy_theory.html
Thread:Links for research
Post:Re: expectancy Theory
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expectancy_theory
Thread:Out of Town Notice, June 9th
Post:Re: Out of Town Notice, June 9th
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Go get ’em, Tim.
John.
Thread:W3BQ2 – Levels
Post:Re: W3BQ2 – Levels
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Sure. Some managers needs to be sort of good at everything – like in the case of your general fast food manager. If they don’t know how to manage money or aren’t good at keeping employees somewhat motivated, they’ll close down that McDonald’s when they don’t have any money or employees left. Though, not many McDonalds close that I’ve seen, which may be a result of training or corporate bailouts, etc.
On the other hand, there are some cases, such as technology project managers, where you absolutely have to be good at keeping track of time, and maybe money, but you might not need to worry about managing people in the least.
I see some of those shifts happening now in my organization, where someone’s strengths and their weaknesses are being re-evaluated, and new positions are being developed to capitalize on one person’s strengths in project management and another person’s strength in personnel management.
While it’s great to try to have cross trained managers, there are some cases where the training will likely be specialized to emphasize the needs of one manager position that aren’t necessarily important in another manager position.
John.
Thread:W3BQ1 – Self-Assessment
Post:Re: W3BQ1 – Self-Assessment
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I have to be attentive to the needs of my staff, peers, and my Assoc. VP. If I only do what I want, I only serve myself.
I have to be technically literate and be aware of the changes in the area of technology and how they affect education and the business of education. If I decide to stop learning about the new tools, it might make my life easier, but it makes Rider less aware of what’s out there to help teach and learn.
I have to be scheduled and make sure that certain things happen at certain times. If I decide to ignore my agenda, and things don’t happen, they might not have another chance to happen.
I have to be flexible and understand that not everyone works like me, not everyone wants the same things I do out of my job, and not everyone is thinking the same way as I am. Seeing another’s point of view is a new skill I’m working on.
I have to be open minded and listen and pay strong attention to different voices in my department, my university, and those outside of the workplace. Gerzon’s advice to see the whole system is priceless.
I have to share knowledge and be willing to ‘train my replacement’ or take a chance at making myself obsolete if it means making the organization better. The best thing I could do is to make everyone so technology literate that they wouldn’t need me anymore. That’s scary.
I have to be patient and realize that real, good, strong change takes time, and not everyone is as willing to change as I am. But things are happening.
John.
Thread:PERSONAL VALUES
Post:Re: PERSONAL VALUES
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
In any inquiry or dialogue that begins to list the needs and wants of both the organization and the member of the org, I think both parties would benefit from the shared knowledge. Especially if either acts to work towards the other’s goals.
John.
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Re: Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’d like to take on Vroom’s Expectancy Theory.
John.
Thread:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Post:Responsibilities for motivational theories
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
So far Chris D. has chosen Herzberg’ Two-Factor Theory and Chadi has chosen Maslow’s Hierarchy.
Any other takers? I’ll respond with my first choice.
John
Thread:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Post:Physical/Virtual Meeting?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Is anyone interested in having a one-time or regular virtual or physical meeting where we could get together to report individual progress? This was mentioned as a part of another thread, I thought breaking out info about it here might be useful.
phone? voip? gtalk with voice?
location?
chat?
something else?
time? date? restrictions? vacations?
John.
Thread:Choosing a leader
Post:Choosing a leader
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Should we have a designated leader to keep us organized?
Is there a project manager amongst us?
Do we have any votes? If we are interested do we have a volunteer?
John.
Thread:Links for research
Post:Links for research
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thought this might be a useful thread for research links.
I saw some good links in Learning Group D that I thought we might find useful too. Go group D! I mean B!
http://www.12manage.com/methods_herzberg_two_factor_theory.html
http://bizetimes.webster.edu/archives/november2001/busn-termpaper11-01.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motivation
Thread:Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Post:Re: Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tashira says:
“Currently this is my situation, I have three employees that are over age 45, sometimes I feel as though they are not taking me serious because I am younger. Other times they look to me as if I am the elder. This is hard to deal with sometimes because I try to relate to them like we are on the same level, making sure that I communicate effectively is very important.
If anyone has any suggestions, I welcome them.”
Tashira,
I would say that what you are looking for here is some common ground. I think Gerzon gives a few tools to help you find that common ground, like inquiry, dialogue, conscious conversation, and especially bridging. I’m completely sold on the idea that conflicts can mean almost any sort of problem, to something as small as this – your question seems to be: “how do I meet my diverse [in age] co-workers at eye level?” and the answer is in playing with the tools to find out what it is that erases your differences in age. Maybe you have the same favorite foods or hobbies. Maybe you want to achieve the same things in your work. Maybe you want the same things out of life. How would you know without inquiry? How could you strengthen the bonds without dialogue? How could you work out forums for finding these things out without Conscious conversation? How can you create roads of communication between you and these diverse in age/background/other co-workers without bridging?
Best of luck – I see lots of opportunities myself all of a sudden with people I was sure I had nothing in common with.
John.
Thread:PERSONAL VALUES
Post:Cheers Re: PERSONAL VALUES
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Good for you, Elizabeth!
John.
Thread:PERSONAL VALUES
Post:Re: PERSONAL VALUES
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think doing a yearly survey where a series of questions about the values an individual has in terms of motivators would be helpful for leadership.
It could use the list of motivational values that Tim passed out to us. It might make a question of each, asking “On a scale of 1-5 how important is it that your job/church/community/family organization allows you to attain the following: ” and so on.
That way, after tabulation, you could gather some interesting data not only on individual motivational values, but what the trends are year to year in what motivates the organization as a whole.
The motivational values would probably change from organization to organization, since the list of values for a church congregation to be studied would be different from a university or a fortune 500 company, but hopefully, you could, at the very least, see why people are taking part in the organization, and what would be both preferable to them and unacceptable to them, then emphasize or diminish those motivations.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
You have to have a free Google account, which can use your Rider email account for email. I’ll be happy to explain in detail, but here’s the gist:
Go to the link in the thread. Click on “login” if you already have a google account, or “create an account” if you need a google account.
Then, after you’re logged in, click on “edit this document” and you’ll be able to edit the document as though you were in Word. We all can.
I’ll be happy to explain over the phone or via email, if you’d like. I really appreciate everyone’s patience, but I think you may want to use this in your other classes too!
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I granted access a few hours back.
j.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Go Learning Group B!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Me too – even though I’ll be in OCNJ, I’d be happy to meet via phone, chat, video, or whatever.
aim: lemasney
gtalk: lemasney
yahoo: lemasney
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Go Learning Group B!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I work at Rider, but I will be on vacation in OCNJ during the week leading up to the 22nd. Bad timing on my part. I promise I won’t slack!
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I hope you like it and find it useful, and if not, we’ll do something else. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, June 8, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
You can use your existing google/gmail account, or create a new one if you prefer.
I appreciate you all trying this out.
j.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 7, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth, I’m sure you didn’t intend the generalization – it was just my interpretation, and I guess I just wanted to engage your point of view a bit more, because I found it interesting.
I’m definitely biased in favor of Semler’s methods, and I want them to be possible, despite what the reality might be.
While I am reading Semler, I wish I could try to implement about 1 out of every 3 motivational techniques here. I can see how some people would try to take advantage of it, but in Semco’s scheme those workers would be weeded out through various organizational reviews, such as the 360 degree subordinate review, hiring and promotion by subordinates, and other checks and balances in their system. I think that while the Semco systems seem like a delight in a lot of ways, it also seems like there is a lot of pressure from peers, the bottom line, and other places that ensure that work is getting done, effectively, efficiently, and thoroughly, despite mandated vacations, unaudited travel expenses and the like. I don’t think slackers are tolerated at Semco, which may be surprising to some.
In Semler’s view the freedoms and democracy that are offered come at the price of hard work with clear results. Without those results, I’m sure that all of the wonderful perks and innovations would quickly go away.
Above all, I wanted to note that I found your post interesting, and was glad to get the chance to converse about it. In this last post where you say “I don’t think you can look at an organization and study their leadership without studying the underlying culture of their society as well.” I couldn’t agree more, and I don’t know very much about Brazil either, but it sounds wonderful, mostly, from the POV of this book. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 7, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Since technology evangelism is what I do, I would be happy to support anyone who is willing to try to use this technology! Honestly – I haven’t met anyone yet who was introduced to Google Docs who didn’t love it.
609 896 5000 x7145.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Google Docs Invite
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 7, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chadi, we absolutely can use our own docs and find ways to share them. However, if we use stand alone applications at each of our own desktops, then we will have to do the sharing and merging of the various documents manually.
Google Docs, or a wiki, centralize the document so that we can all log in and edit it in the same online place. It offers all of the functionality of Microsoft Word, for example, but with the added benefit of making changes to a single central shared document.
I’ve gone ahead and made a doc on GDS, and invite all of you [in our learning group] to use the link below to begin editing the document. If you try it and like it, we can use it, if you don’t we can do something else.
Clicking below will allow you to log into Google with a Google account [like a gmail account for instance] and edit this shared document.
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dckfm9fw_23g86bc3&invite=ddcbdrg
John.
Thread:Jose Reyes Email?
Post:Re: Jose Reyes Email?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 7, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I dropped a note to the helpdesk about the email address, which they agreed was malfunctioning, and got this response today:
John,
The email address (reyesjo) is working correctly now. I tested it from inside Rider and outside Rider. Let me if there is anything else I can help you with.
Hope this helps,
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, June 7, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth,
I’m not satisfied with what might be called a generalization about Americans. It may be your experience that leads you to believe that there isn’t a strong work ethic in most Americans, and your experience is certainly legitimate, as is anyone’s, but your generalization doesn’t ring true for me. My experience leads me to think that there are lots of Americans who have a great work ethic, but I couldn’t generalize to say most of them are great, invested workers. Even if I wanted to. πŸ˜‰
When you say “So many people from other countries are doing work here in the US that most Americans don’t want to do” I’m just thinking that many of those people don’t have any other choice but to start in the trenches of our workplace, and Americans, by birthright, often do. Our country makes it difficult to get rewarding work if you sneak in or if you don’t have a driver’s license or if you don’t have immigration papers or if you don’t speak english or (insert other requirement here). The people categorized in my statement have to go pick up trash or cut grass or clean toilets, jobs that have to be done that business owners are willing to ‘look the other way’ regarding immigration law. I had all of these jobs too, incidentally, and I had the benefit of the birthright. I learned that doing work that means something is its own reward, and it drove me out of those jobs. Some people just don’t have that choice.
I think that again and again, Semler talks about his resistance by employees, especially before some successes in these innovations, such as the passage:
“I believed perhaps 20 percent of the middle managers were actually sympathetic to my efforts to make our factories and offices more democratic. I suspected another 20 percent laughed heartily at it, considering me a rebel with an inheritance. It was the rest of them who would determine whether I succeeded.”(Semler, 1993, p.94)
I don’t think there was a lot more faith in his organization about many his proposals than you have in most American workers, but in this case, Semler took a risk, innovated, and won.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Marybeth – that’s fantastic – exactly what I was looking for! If I can go into a dialogue about the idea with a model in hand, it may help to sway those who think it will be too much work to develop.
Also, even if HR decides against it on a global scale they may consider a modified version of it for individual departments or areas where it’s called for, like OIT. Even without HR’s commitment or backing, it’s very probable that we could begin to use this internally, but of course it would be preferable for them to help us to develop it, considering the amount of work they’ve put into developing and refining the PDP.
Thanks again!
John.
Thread:Week 3A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 3A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Because it drove me to begin talking with peers about open issues, start new cross organizational partnerships, help establish a weekly council for OIT (look for us outside of Centennial at 3:30 on Thursdays), talk to HR and my VP about subordinate led assessment and goal planning, finishing Leading Through Conflict and beginning , and talking to my VP about motivational changes that could make a real difference for those that feel oppressed, I feel like this class and my learning are very quickly changing the way I regard my role at Rider.
My next change I plan to look at is the way that we do generalized technology training at Rider, which has recently come under my responsibility. I had already been doing faculty development, but this is different, in that it is pure technology training, like how to use Word, etc. I’m looking forward to changing the models we have in place, namely presentation and demonstration style training, into sessions that are divided into inquiry portions, dialogue portions, and bridging portions, resulting in innovations. For instance, instead of starting a session with the words, “Okay, everyone open up powerpoint, and let’s make some slides!” we might start the new sessions with the words “Why do you think that you need to know how to use PowerPoint?” or “Why are you here today” or “When you present your material, what is the method that you use?”
Then we might move to a dialogue portion, where we begin to try to develop solutions to the issues raised by the answers to the questions. We might begin to make connections between the science teacher’s need to communicate a concept to a student and a secretary’s need to communicate an idea to her student workers.
Then we can begin to find real world solutions, and whether they involve powerpoint or not is another matter.
I’m excited by the prospect of moving away from the traditional presentation style, and until I read Gerzon’s section on Conscious Conversation, I thought it was my only choice.
John.
Thread:Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Post:Re: Additional Insight – Motivating the Younger Worker
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think a leader should be aware of the motivational values of their subordinates regardless of age, and I think that the subordinate has some responsibility in that. I know that my eyes were opened up a little bit with the motivational values worksheet. I find that experience affects one’s motivational values much more than age. For instance, if my motivational value choice is “have a family” and I’m thirty five – is my choice because I’m thirty five, or because I’m a father?
Regardless, I don’t think I had any idea how important and influential the fact that I have a family is on my work life and decisions. My point is, if I didn’t know, how would my supervisor know? Workers should make an effort to find out what drives them to work, and they should (probably with some caution) let their employer know. It’s definitely showing your hand, but without trust, everything else is in question anyway.
Finally, I have to say, I’m personally seeing this article as a bit biased. What are these wide scope generalizations like “The younger set, Millennials, born after 1980, have a unique work ethic, too. They have been coddled and look to the workplace for personal fulfillment. Yet they want active lives outside the office.” based on? Are they based on Motivational studies with hundreds or thousands on diverse-in-age employees with varied backgrounds? Or is it biased individual quotes like the one from Marston where he says “They are living at home and having their meat cut for them,” and “They aren’t lusting to take promotions because they don’t see that as success.” Was there a study done to come to this conclusion, or does he have a problem with an employee? Inquiry, my friends, might help to find this out.
I’m not very happy with the way the article makes its points, but I tend to look for bias and generalizations in strong worded articles like this one, which makes it harder for me to be unbiased in their interpretation.
When the one interviewee is quoted as saying “Give me interesting work; make me feel part of a team; make my time at work valuable so I can have spare time to do other things,” does that statement really speak to a generalized age based experience? Couldn’t that just as easily have been spoken believable by an octogenarian, a teenager, or a baby-boomer?
I’m not fond of the generalizations in the article, but I’m glad we had the opportunity to talk about the issue.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Renee,
When you said “Semco doesn’t seem to be small potatoes, at least if I am reading it right. So, I am not sure size is an issue as much either” it made me think about the portion of the book that talks about “Gigantism” which is explored by Semler in chapter 15, Divide and Prosper, in which he takes “the Amoeba Approach” to divide meandering organizations within the company into smaller groups, to be more independent, continue innovation, and be generally less uniform. So, I would say that even Semler believes that size matters, but he innovates by just dividing his groups into smaller more manageable chunks.
He asks the question and answers it:
“How small is small enough? For some companies the magic number is 500. For others, the maximum might be a few dozen. Usually, though, people will perform at their potential only when they know almost everyone around them, which is generally when there are no more than 150 people.”(Semler, 1993, p.125)
and I’m inclined to agree. I know that being part of a division with 50 people in it has its challenges, too. I’m sad to say that there are people even right in OIT that I’ve never had the pleasure to meet, and while I plan on fixing that, it’s not fixed yet. It’s easier, in my opinion, to work with someone after you’ve met them, but needing their help and meeting them often happens in the same breath.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Google Docs Tour is a tour of Google Docs and Spreadsheets.
I absolutely love this tool for this kind of work, and I think you all will too, but I’m very much open to alternatives.
John.
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Re: research threads
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim assigment says “Discuss which of the following motivation theories would be most effective to motivate these employee groups and explain why… Your team should research each of these theories, as well as any other popular theory presented in the three textual readings used in this course.”
I’m thinking that to organize our findings we could have:
1) separate threads for us to post cited findings about each of the listed motivational theories, plus
2) new threads for posting cited findings on any additional text based motivational theories we might like to look at, as well as
3) a thread where we can post suggestions and models of the fictional organizations we each might like to work with.
4) Also, we could use a tool like Google Docs and Spreadsheets, [ Google Docs FAQ ] where we could have editable sections available for anyone in our group to edit.
It’s free and I have used it in a few collaborative writing projects. You can also use it to create a Word Document. You can actually have 2 or more people simultaneously working on the same document in real time from 2 or more different locations.
Otherwise, we’ll end up passing the document around via the discussion board or email, which could get messy fast.
Thoughts? Can we have a vote on these proposals? Alternatives?
John.
Thread:The Assignment
Post:The Assignment
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Just so we have it here for reference, I figured I’d post Tim’s assignment here.
In this final assignment, the students will be divided into small learning groups. (The faculty by the end of Week One will create Teams.) The students will collaborate within the team on making recommendation to the following scenario:
Motivation Paper
Prepare a 1,400-2,100-word paper applying motivation theories to a fictitious organization. This fictitious organization has the following three types of employees: salespeople, production workers, and administrative staff. Discuss which of the following motivation theories would be most effective to motivate these employee groups and explain why:
a. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
b. ERG (Aldefer)
c. Two-Factor Theory (Herzberg)
d. Equity Theory (Adams)
e. Expectancy Theory (Vroom)
Your team should research each of these theories, as well as any other popular theory presented in the three textual readings used in this course.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi Kieana,
I agree with you and I meant to say to Elizabeth that maybe should could use a scenario like I was describing to the higher ups but using someone’s position in her office that would be a huge problem if they were out for more than a couple of days. Even if the boss may be able to show someone else how to do it, how much better it would be if they could cross train without having to put the boss out in a crisis to do so.
So, keep being the lone voice of wisdom in the dark and eventually, maybe, they will listen and finally see that wisdom in full light for the wisdom it is. Use your new found knowledge to put it in the best light and don’t forget the age old adage that most bosses priority is the bottom line, so find a way to make one scenario show how it would be less of a hit on the bosses pocket book thant the other and they usually will listen more…at least more than probably before. Keep trying and I pray success for you with it. As John LeMasney mentioned in another post this week about having fun applying what we are learning from Gerzon, but actually putting it into action is when it is time to really work (or the hard part). You can do it though. TTYL.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:Go Learning Group B!
Post:Go Learning Group B!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Let’s show them what Leadership is all about!
Wait a second – it’s inclusion and equality. πŸ˜‰
J.
Thread:Travel Alert – June 2nd
Post:Re: Travel Alert – June 2nd
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
But what a ROI!
John.
Thread:W3AQ3 – Transformational Leadership
Post:Re: W3AQ3 – Transformational Leadership
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim and friends,
As we discussed here in the past, I think if the change is clearly for the better in most people’s minds, and there is little effort or upheaval due to the change, people are less likely to resist the change. As you get further from those ideals, change is more resisted. Also, as Gerzon theorizes on p. 210 in Leading Through Conflict, “Most organizations…tend to ‘shoot down’ potentially good ideas before they can take root” due to clashing egos and power struggles. Any change is potentially scheduled to fail in a situation where the proposed change isn’t ‘owned’ by the people affected by it, and so I would propose that one of the best ways to reduce resistance to change is to involve the constituents of the change in the design of the change.
This has generally been the effect of the changes applied to the Rider University web site. Due to plenty of ‘public’ design review sessions and constituency hearings where people voiced not only ideas for improvements, but their disdain for certain color and other design choices, the design changes that are applied to the site are community driven and very much a matter of horizontal management. There are also regular meetings of the keepers of the different parts of the site to share ideas, problems, issues, questions, and feedback.
If the people who would be plaintiffs are the people involved in the design, the complaints magically deliciously disappear. πŸ˜‰
It wasn’t always done this way. At one time we had a single point of design management, and the result was that no one but that single person making the design decisions and changes was very happy with them.
John
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
In discussing this with my VP today, I heard the same argument, which is valid. However, if it were enough of a tool for those who need to voice their intended goals for their supervisors and have it be effective, I think that I wouldn’t have people in my office, asking me what to do about their supervisor.
In the situation like Lauren’s and mine, where communication is already open and there is ample opportunity for feedback, the existing PDP probably provides enough of a forum to voice one’s opinion of their supervisor.
However, since it requires some insight, interpretation and vocal freedom to consider the existing PDP as already asking someone to critique or otherwise set goals for their supervisor, a new section with that a bit more clearly stated as its purpose might be welcome.
Although, in light of today’s meeting, if I want to push the matter with my VP, I think I have a long road ahead of me, since she sees subordinate feedback opportunities on the existing form. I smell a conflict.
Where’s that section on Conscious Conversation again? πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:LEARNING TEAM EXERCISE
Post:LEARNING TEAM EXERCISE
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Class,
In the final assignment (due on June 22, 2007), I have requested you work in small groups, as you develop a team analysis of motivation theories.
As we have 23 active students in the class, I am announcing the formation of four teams (5 or 6 members each), which have been compiled using straight-line alphabetical order of your last names. Therefore, the teams are as follows:
Learning Group A Learning Group B
Lauren Adams
Christine DeFrehn
Kieanna Childs
Carolyn Hoelzle
Shaun Clarida
Renee Lackie
Marybeth Consiglio
John LeMasney
Dan Cumming
Chadi Lewis
Robert MacAuley
Learning Group C Learning Group D
Terri Marriott
Elizabeth Sandy
Karen Nanni
Denise Sarcewicz
Karen Neukirchen
Christie Schwaikert
Diani Nini
Elizabeth Soles
David Pone
Charles Weatherspoon
Jose Reyes
Tashira York-Funchers
You are welcomed to use the individual forum I have built for your group’s project. You may also augment and complement the asynchronous forum, in any communication media of your choice.
During the final week, each of the groups’ project will be shared with the entire class, as another way of learning from one another.
I thank you in advance for your willingness to collaborate.
Tim Glaid

Dr. Tim Glaid
Rider University
412 200-3076 (office)
412 835-6223 (home)
412 260-5841 (cell)
tglaid@rider.edu
Thread:W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Post:Re: W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I can see the value of the what-if scenario that Kieanna is raising, and it’s a good question, but I agree with Christine – there’s just not a likelihood of anything like that coming from Mort. There’s a high level of trust, I think, between Mort and a lot of people here.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m thinking, too, that it could be either a) a pleasant and rewarding experience for the supervisor who treats her organization with respect – a reinforcing motivator where the supervisor might decide to devise random acts of spontaneous reward for good work, potentially increasing an employee’s job satisfaction, because it might end up in their subordinate-led review or b) a reinforcing motivator where the supervisor who is quick to unnecessarily lash out or perform passive aggressive behaviors begins to think twice before doing it, as it might end up in the subordinate-led review.
But first and foremost, I agree, it would be a tool for the oppressed amongst us, whose toolkit is small to begin with.
Thanks for the support!
John.
Thread:W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Post:Re: W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for the kind words, Renee!
John.
Thread:W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Post:Re: W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
And while we’re at it, I’d like credit for what Kieanna just wrote. πŸ˜‰ I only paid her a small fee to say that.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, June 5, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Kieanna!
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Terri,
I agree about the trickiness of it. I’ve been wondering: How do you create a fair, quiet way to allow an employee to tell you that your leadership style needs to be improved? Is it a scale based form, such as “On a scale from 1 to 5, where 1 is poor and 5 is great, how would you rate the effectiveness of your supervisor?” or should it be more open ended, like “Describe in essay form how you feel that your supervisor could improve their leadership style.” Of course there could be a mix of these and 10 other feedback tools.
It just occurred to me that this is exactly what often happens in an end-of-semester teacher evaluation form.
If this does cause problems that don’t exist, it might be because the reporting tool is poorly designed. Maybe Semco has a model for the subordinate led evaluation. Right now, the problems that do exist aren’t always being reported, even between the people who are conflicted. I know the problems exist though, because sometimes they’re confided to me, outside of the circle where something can truly be done.
I know that even in past conflicted situations, the PDP has worked fairly well for me to communicate expectations and to create a clear path to what could be quantified as progress or success within the next year. Where it fails is that the employee can’t use it to communicate the expectations they might have of me back to me or anyone else. The “subordinate evaluation performance development plan” might help employees to do just that.
It’s risky, and it may cause new problems, but the alternative is that only one side has a voice and the communication is going only one way, without a feedback loop. That’s where we are right now.
I’m also of the mindset that a leader wants to have several different feedback tools, assessments, and monitors to have some way of knowing how their efforts are affecting their goals, positively or negatively, so that adjustments can be made. With a tool like this, subordinate job satisfaction can begin to be assessed.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I haven’t heard anything yet, but if something comes about, I’ll be sure to share. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Terri!
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee,
While I realize that some people may become complacent because of a forced distribution performance evaluation, there are others who may continue to excel and overachieve. In my own experiences, I have had other people recognize my work and actually state to me, “Why do you even bother because your supervisor could care less”. However, I continue to work hard and I know that a better opportunity is on the horizon.
Elizabeth
Thread:W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Post:Re: W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that there should be a “4) We all win” scenario.
If we not only address the needs of both parties or views, but also those of additional points of view, other stakeholders, and even those who might be affected but may not even know that they’ll be affected, then we really make the most of the negotiation.
In the fourth scenario, everyone, even the unknowing affected group, may need to make compromises in order to come out winning, but anyone coming out as the single clear ‘winner’ in the negotiation will undoubtedly lead to an unsustainable solution, because without ownership of the solution, it just won’t be held to, or if it is, it will be at the cost of the trust, allegiance, and collegiality of the losing point of view, possibly ruining that relationship.
Answers.com Business Dictionary defines White Elephant as “A useless and troublesome possession that one cannot easily get rid of. Legend has it that rare albino elephants in ancient Siam automatically became the property of the king. At least one such monarch gave a white elephant to any courtier who fell out of favor; the subject was soon ruined by the cost of maintaining this precious gift.” ( http://www.answers.com/topic/white-elephant )
In a situation where a negotiation leads to a solution that is imposed by one party on another party that has no choice but to keep it, the solution, in my opinion, is like a White Elephant.
John LeMasney.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim and class,
Couldn’t have done it without your help! Here’s hoping we start something wonderful here.
John.
Thread:PERSONAL VALUES
Post:Re: PERSONAL VALUES – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Top 10: Competence, creativity, having a family, inner harmony, job tranquility, knowledge, personal development, recognition, self-respect, stability
Top 5: having a family, inner harmony, job tranquility, personal development, stability
Top 3: having a family, inner harmony, job tranquility
Number 1: having a family.
It’s funny, on my first pass, in which I was compelled to choose 15 values, I completely skipped ‘having a family’ but when I saw it again, I realized not only that it was important to me, but it dominates the decisions I make about what I do in my job.
Since having a family (which I’m personally expanding into being a father, being a husband, providing my part of the responsibility for the home and expenses, having some pride in our enterprise of a family, doing my part to have all that we need) is so very important in my life now, it affects (negates?) the risks that I take in my job, my motivation for staying in this job, the importance of stability in the job as a byproduct, the hours I work, the attitude I keep, the level of time commitments I make, and well, everything.
Today, I might make an extra effort to bite my tongue in a meeting about some heated topic, since I don’t want to upset the wrong person, lose my job, and have Jack go without… anything. It might seem like such a jump in logic, but in the same heated meeting 3 years ago, when my son wasn’t yet born, I might have been more willing to take a stand on a topic.
This is just one small decision (tongue biting) in thousands that are affected by that motivator (having a family) for me.
Generally speaking, the culture of my job allows for most if not all of my values to exist and be met. I am a little bit embarrassed by my choices, I guess, as I see that I did not choose, for instance ‘helping society’ or ‘open and honest’ but while those are important and present in this job, they pale in comparison to my value of “having a family” or “job tranquility.”
If I had to choose a job based on either the ability to have a family or have anything else, there’s just no contest.
Tim, thanks for passing us this great tool. I hadn’t really thought of things in this way before.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Putting my money where my mouth is, here is my just sent email to HR:
In redesigning the PDP, was there ever any talk of either a subsection, or an additional form to allow for direct reports to help develop goals, give feedback, or otherwise evaluate their supervisor? In other words, a very simple implementation of this might be that on my PDP, there would a comments section where Angel Brady could express herself in free form text about my role as a supervisor. In a more elaborate scheme, a full length second PDP for each person would be filled out with the parts traditionally completed by the supervisor being done by a small team of direct reports or peers.
It seems like we all get the opportunity to hear what our supervisors think of us, and while I have an open line of communication with my supervisor and might consider giving frank evaluative advice, not everyone has that same opportunity. The ability to evaluate in a form sometimes give license to speak to issues that a verbal conversation just doesn’t have.
Just a thought.
John.
Thread:W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Post:Re: W3AQ2 – Ricardo Semler
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, June 4, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m not finished “Maverick” yet, but it’s a good fun read. My impressions are that his approaches and motivational tools are brilliant, though I think that you likely need a company of a certain size, a fantastic filtering mechanism in hiring, and an eligible industry for these approaches to work.
I have worked in organizations that have used mild forms of some Semco motivational tools, such as Working Hours (Semler, 1993, p. 202) where people choose their own. For instance, at Rider during flex time you can choose to come in earlier or later, and you can choose how long of a lunch you wish to take, but in flex time several rules are applied, like core hours where everyone must be present. Semler might say that the core hours rule creates an unnecessary constraint on one’s freedom to choose, but since customers expect us all to be present for phone calls, walk ins, and other real time conversation, this particular motivation might cause some friction. In another industry or another department at Rider where real time conversation isn’t essential, this Semco motivational tool might be able to be applied in full.
One I’d personally love to suggest implementation of is the Evaluation by Subordinates (Semler, 1993, p. 307) because I’ve done enough unofficial mentoring with others at Rider where I found out all too much about how someone felt about their supervisor, and yet the supervisor never got to hear it, as they felt too intimidated to say anything to their supervisor, there is no tool in place to provide this communication, and it wasn’t really my place to breach the confidence of the subordinate. I’m planning on suggesting this kind of evaluation tool to my VP and to HR as a PDP addon.
I get to tell my employees what I think of them, and my VP gets to tell me, but nowhere do I get a chance to help develop the goals of my VP. I would love to know what my employees might like me to do differently and a PDP subsection where this was allowed might help with that.
John.
Thread:W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Post:Re: W3AQ1 – Opportunities
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Successful leaders see differences as collections of points of views. Gerzon might suggest that where differences exist, similarities and common ground also exist. Even in the most entrenched battling co-conflictors, there is usually some common thread, something that all of the involved parties want to happen more than the conflict.
Those common goals can be opportunities to transform the conflict into something useful for everyone involved.
In my own life, I’m seeing the potential opportunity for this kind of transformative conflict resolution. There is another person who is on a peer level with me at work – althought this person does not see me as a peer (I’m assuming due to cues I’ve gotten) we are both in leadership roles, and we are both responsible for sub departmental offices. We have conflicts about a lot of issues, and not all about technology. For instance:
We view art and creativity differently. We view software choices differently. We see executing training differently. We see the potential of people in our departments differently. We have much different personas. This person is from another country, which gives us different world views in key ways – not bad just different.
I realize that working together with this person would be so much more beneficial to the entire organization than working around them. But we do not have a common trust. We have had several historical events that have broken our friendship and peership.
We view simple and complex issues alike with wide and gaping differences.
I know from reading Gerzon what I need to do, and I am planning out how to go about it.
I need to use inquiry to unearth the reasons why we see things so differently, and to clear up misconceived assumptions that I know that I have, but that we likely both have.
I need to use integrated vision to see not ‘my department’ and ‘their department’ but ‘our organization’ and ‘our university’, which I have started to do since reading Gerzon.
We need to do bridging, so that we can both see how we can help each other, as opposed to what we are doing now, which is wall building and ignorance.
I need to use conscious conversation to choose some key
ways of communication, such as dialogue and council, rather than what we have now, which is mostly presentation, debate, and verbal brawling.
I need to engage systems thinking to remember that the decisions that I make don’t just affect me, my staff, or my key constituents, but also this person, their staff, and their constituents. We, Our staff, our constituents. And everyone is a constituent. πŸ˜‰
We need to come up with innovations as a result of the use of these other tools, to ensure that we don’t fall back to our old ways of thinking and doing separately.
I’m having fun applying what I’ve learned, but now comes the work part.
John.
Thread:Week 2B Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 2B Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Right back at you, Tashira. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W2BQ4 – Personal Values
Post:Re: W2BQ4 – Personal Values
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
Your example actually played out for me in an organization I belonged to.
After each monthly meeting for a computer user’s group I belonged to, there was a post meeting get together used as a social gathering, but the leadership of the group chose to have it at a local bar. In fact, the origins of the group included formation in a bar, and subsequent relocation to a library community room, so there may be some sentiment attached to this issue. As a result of retreating to a bar, only a small portion of the meeting group continued to the after party, as many of us had families, were sober or chose not to drink in the middle of the week, or not to drink and drive, or would rather be in a more neutral environment. As a result, I felt like myself and others were really uninvited by the nature of the environment of the social setting.
I made inquiries about having the get together at somewhere more neutral, like a restaurant that served alcohol, so that those that wished to imbibe could, and those who didn’t wouldn’t feel as though they were bumps on a log, but I wasn’t able to sway their thinking. Instead, I ended up feeling as though the voices of the members weren’t being properly heard.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Some of the feedback in the climate survey was already addressed during a recent town hall meeting. I’m confident that there is activity being developed to respond to concerns and the emphasize strengths.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I mean that it’s an impossibility for us all to have the best job in the world. πŸ˜‰ The best is the best, the others are second-best, etc. Thus the enigma, burrito, et. al.
John.
Thread:Travel Alert – June 2nd
Post:Congratulations!
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
She’s graduating! Congratulations to all three of you!
John
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Huh?
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
You are right Elizabeth. This is a sticky situation but I am hopeful things will work out in the end. ~Kieanna
Thread:Week 2B Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 2B Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, June 3, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I really spent most of this week catching up on reading and working out some of the issues that the end of Gerzon’s book and the beginning of Maverick have raised.
Gerzon has really changed the way I view my everyday organizational conflicts. For instance:
How many of our own organizational problems in OIT could be ended by changing the format of meetings from presentations to councils? We may find this out, as I have talked our VP into conducting “Thursday round tables” where everyone in OIT is invited outside for an hour on Thursday afternoons to quietly share a snack and answer a questions, such as our first one: “What is your greatest accomplishment of the last year?” My premise was that we don’t get a chance as an entire group to get together on a regular basis and share our jobs, our problems, our issues, and when we do get the opportunity, it is often interrupted by argument, problem solving, and other things besides listening. Due to established ground rules, such as
1. no interruptions
2. listen, rather than determine your own answer
3. wait a moment after an answer before answering to let silence work
4. no crosstalk or new questions
you get the added benefits of other unspoken rules, such as “no judgements” .
In retrospect, it seems so obvious and simple, but who would have thought a one-way format would be more effective for a certain kind of communication than the typical two-way meeting style.
Our first one had 12 people show up out of about 30, which is actually pretty successful. Great answers were shared, one at a time, quietly, separately, and without interruption, and I got to learn some things about the people in my group that I never would have known otherwise.
Also, one of my long time co-conflictors took part and shared, and it was a chance for us to celebrate each other for once.
I could nopt have doen it without this class, these conversations, and that great text. Thanks to all!
This is the first of what I think will be a lot of great outcomes from this new knowledge.
John.
Thread:W2BQ3 – Imprint and Leadership Impressions
Post:Re: W2BQ3 – Imprint and Leadership Impressions
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
President Rozanski’s imprint, as others have said in this thread and others, has been significant here at Rider. His imprint is one of change, improvement, betterment, and longevity. Mort is looking at things with a long scope. Some of the things that stand out as major cultural shifts that are directly due to his arrival include:
The town hall meetings, where regular updates on major university issues are given – this communication gives insights into progress on projects where none existed before, especially if you were not in that loop.
The new strategic plan with all of it’s systems thinking and integral vision aspects.
Facilities development. The campuses are being actively improved all the time.
An emphasis on students.
A more complete Westminster integration.
The recognizance of the importance of alumni relations, emeriti faculty relations, friends of the university relations, prospective students, and other “off-campus” people.
International relationships. Need I say more than Sanda?
Mort is the best thing that ever happened to this place since Andrew J. Rider himself.
The change to the culture is not complete, but it has been going on for more than a few years now, and I think most of the shock and awe has passed, while smaller changes continue.
John.
Thread:W2BQ1 – Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W2BQ1 – Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
If the definition of organizational culture is “1) core goals and values; 2) strategy; 3) business processes; 4) structure; 5) systems; 6) people and skills; and finally 7) leadership influence.” (Tim’s Lecture) then to establish it in the right way, you have to find out what each of these are in the organization currently, and what they can become, if the current state is not ‘right’. How does one find out what the core goals and values are? Well, there are ideals, like a University may want to have their core values be diversity, innovation, and scholarship. One needs a tool to unearth these answers. These might be defined by collecting a list of 1000 or 3000 or 5000 potential ideal core goals and values common to world class successful universities, then distributing this list to all of the people in the university [students, staff, faculty, alumni, everyone else] and asking what they believe the core values are and what they should be, and what core values are missing from the list etc. A dialogue has to take place. Inquiry has to take place. The views of the whole have to be engaged, heard and acted upon. In searching out the answers to the questions of what makes up the organizational culture with he people who make up that culture, as well as how the culture is perceived by people outside of it, the right culture can be defined and worked towards.
The same might be done to define ‘strategy’ with a strategic plan – bringing together constituencies, looking at successful, ideal strategic plans, doing SWOT analysis, and so on. Each of these elements of organizational culture could be defined in this way, and then motivational tools could be developed to move the organization towards these ideals.
John.
Thread:W2BQ1 – Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W2BQ1 – Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
As everyone has stated here, without communication – real communication, it will be hard to achieve anything else.
Good article, Christie – thanks for sharing.
John.
Thread:W2BQ1 – Organizational Culture
Post:Re: W2BQ1 – Organizational Culture
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks for the info, Renee.
John
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christie, when you said ” I don’t think it is possible to be 100% satisfied at work, even if the person is self-employed. ” it definitely rings true for me.
Every time I was self employed, my job satisfaction rate was around 30%. It helped me to determine what I was better at and what I was not so great at, but I’m glad that I’m able to focus on the aspects of the job that I can focus on, and let facilities help with maintenance, disbursements help with payment, and HR help with insurance, et cetera, et cetera. That being said, it definitely helps to have an integrated vision and systems thinking when the vision and the system for an enterprise start with you.
I did not enjoy most things about self employment, but it taught me a lot. πŸ˜‰
On the issue of morale surveys – we just got one at Rider in the last six months or so, and I know quite a few people were very happy to use it, myself included.
Even though I have the greatest job in the world, there is always room for improvement.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
As I suspected in my question – I really was just blind to the scenario. In fact, I have thought of situations where I was good at the job, but just couldn’t stand it in my own past, so I could have answered my own question if I had thought about it for a minute. πŸ˜‰
Thanks for all the great responses.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi Kieanna,
I am sorry about your current job situation and I can surely empathize with you in regards to favoritism by a supervisor towards certain employees. Often it is very obvious when this happens. If you do address this issue with the supervisor, that person may deny your concerns or label you a complainer or another whiner. Sometimes when an employee has received another promising job opportunity, the supervisor may act like your supervisor in giving a counteroffer, or the supervisor may become quite angry, threatening, or intimidating towards the employee during their final stay within the organization. Also, if a employee decides to stay on after the counteroffer, there may be retaliation at a later time. (I am only sharing observations from past experiences).
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hello John,
Yes, I can provide an example of a job that I disliked but was very competent and knowledgeable in fulfilling all requirements. I once worked at a mid-sized insurance company that provided liablity and contractor insurance in the accounting department. Our staff included about 6 people including the supervisor. Although I enjoyed the diversity of the job assignments and my working relationships with co-workers, the supervisor managed the personnel like a tyrant or a drill sargeant. She would often walk by our desks closely monitoring our work habits, openly criticizing indivuduals harshly. On one occasion, my co-worker shut down her computer at 4:25 PM (hours of operation were 8:30AM-4:30 PM) and she verbally reprimanded so severely by the manager that I was frozen in my chair. Another time, this manager again verbally reprimanded Bob who was an energetic college graduate, always upbeat and very helpful to all colleagues. Even though I escaped this manager’s daily wrath, on this occasion, I was so upset by her treatment of Bob, that I openly defended him, gathered my belongings, and left that company for good. The insurance company has since relocated to North Carolina and I’m sure Bob and company are much happier.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ3 – Group/Teamwork
Post:Re: STAGES OF TEAM BUILDING
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think Tuckman’s theory has real merit. I think that it is optimistic to a fault, as there are plenty of working groups that dissolve into what Gerzon would call verbal brawling and never recover, but in cases where the group stays together and gets something done, I think I’ve seen some existing models to match his theories.
In particular, I think we’ve seen some of Tuckman’s theoretical stages right here. We did forming in week zero, and I think there is some tendency to stay there in our group, but I think that has something to do with the online, accelerated format.
I know that some storming has taken place – Jose and I did some storming, but it never got too rough, for example. Group rules were pretty quickly defined, on topics like politics and religion, for example, and we were kind of apologetically defining our views. A few other instances of this occurred, but nothing too abrasive ever came about.
I think we are norming right now – our conversive rules are well set and regularly reinforced – we’re starting to know what to expect from one another, and while some work is getting done it’s nothing earth shattering.
We are not yet in stage four: performing, in my opinion – the trust and understanding isn’t there yet. There is much more independence than interdependence, and given the nature of our task, e.g. to answer questions in turn and comment on each others responses, I think that’s to be expected.
In order for us to be performing, I think we have to stop trying to out-answer each other or take sides with an issue, and start trying to build out each other’s ideas in more complex ways to get the the multifaceted truth that lies in more than one answer, more than one point of view.
Thread:W2AQ3 – Group/Teamwork
Post:Re: W2AQ3 – Group/Teamwork
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Roles and responsibilities can affect the ways that groups and teams interact. Sometimes a great idea presented as a director’s idea is followed and accepted, but the same great idea presented as a manager’s is criticized and thwarted. Sometimes someone in the ‘boss’ role is allowed to make a decision that someone else would have to fight for. That kind of power comes with responsibility, since the misuse of it can easily breed mistrust or contempt.
A manager can look at motivational factors to create an impact on the effectiveness and performance of the group – what keeps the team interested – what keeps them coming back to work – what keeps them hungray about what they are doing? Once you know that as a manager you can use it to maximize the job satisfaction of your workers, which can significantly improve their productivity, interest, and workmanship.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I know a few others here at Rider with the best job in the world too – impossible!
It’s like some sort of weird multi dimensional conundrum wrapped in an enigma within an intergalactic burrito. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:weekly summaries
Post:Re: Suggestions For Academic Writing
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
Thanks so much for sharing this. I found it very helpful in interpreting some of the finer points of APA style and how, precisely, you wanted it followed.
John.
Thread:Travel Alert – June 2nd
Post:Re: Travel Alert – June 2nd
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, June 2, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Have fun!
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Friday, June 1, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Evaluations never have defined my work ethics. If I am given one, great if not great.
The system can be used in a negative fashion or a positive one, but again, it really depends on the mood of your manager which is why I don’t define myself by what an evaluation states. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Friday, June 1, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John – I also have the best job in the whole world at Rider! It’s so wonderful to want to get to work each day and leave at the end feeling satisfied and glad I was there.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Friday, June 1, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
There continues to be many angles of views on forced distribution. I have seen where this forced distribution does cause frustration and complacency, however occuring in separate situations and among different types of employees. For instance, an employee who tends to be complacent may perform at the minimum levels each day and retaliate by taking advantage of the system. Whereas a person who is filled with frustration due to the outcome of a forced distribution may continue to overperform each day, going over and above the call of duty but to no avail. Both scenerios are not healthy, productive environments for employees to work in. Furthermore, a competing, cut-throat atmosphere is not a pleasant experience. A supervisor who is a true leader would not encourage such a work environment.
Elizabeth~
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Friday, June 1, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine,
In my opinion, if the forced distributions on the evaluations were conducted by management with genuine concern, responsiblity, and honesty towards the employee, then the performance evaluation is truly serving a well-intentioned purpose. Those employees who are indeed deserving would receive such a top evaluation. I tend to think that effective managers would not just give top evaluations across the board to everyone. Although I have encountered supervisors who continued to give top evaluations to employees whose work ethics were questionable. I also feel that sometimes there is a disconnect in the expectations of the performance evaluations in that there are supervisors who consider the evaluation process to be a low priority and another inconvenience. Yet to the employee, this evaluation is of great importance and meaning to that employee.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Friday, June 1, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
In addition, dreams do not materialize overnight. It takes time and hard work to achieve one’s goals in life. And there are times when you just want to throw in the towel, but each day always seems to bring new possibilities and challenges that provide a sense of renewal.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Friday, June 1, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Robert, I am in agreement with you on this point. There will always be obstacles that people face along the career path or in other life matters. Ultimately, it is the person who chooses to stay on that path. As long as you have a strong sense of determination, passion, and commitment in all that you do, you are the creator of your own destiny.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ3 – Group/Teamwork
Post:Re: W2AQ3 – Group/Teamwork
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that an effective leader will take one’s working styles, motivations, and feelings into account the way a great teacher will look at a student’s learning styles, motivations, and feelings to shape the way they approach their own leadership style.
If a good leader puts out feelers through a survey, a council or dialogue session (2006, Gerzon), or a working style or personality test such as the Jung/Briggs-Myer’s Topology test, [ http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes1.htm ] they may get some insight into how their workers will react to different leadership styles and work situations, and that same leader can then use that information to make the most appropriate assignments, group people into more effective workgroups to emphasize strengths and minimize weaknesses, create a more diverse team to provide a solution that requires it, or gather like minded workers for a special task that calls for .75 creative and .25 intuitive or some other ratio.
Or you can throw all that out, and take your people out for a nice dinner and ask them about their personalities, etc.
John.
Thread:weekly summaries
Post:Re: APA Standardization
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I can’t speak for Charles or the School of Grad Ed, but this was my first ever class at Rider, and my first ever graduate class, as well as my first ever application of APA style. I think we used MLA (?) in undergrad.
I hadn’t seen any communication of APA standardization anywhere besides your syllabus and assignment, but I’m glad that it may be a standard across our curriculum, since I’m investing in learning how to apply it here.
Yay.
John.
Thread:Renee Lackey – Email Address?
Post:Re: Renee Lackie – Email Address?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I just modified your note in the e-support database, and I’m going to call the helpdesk myself tomorrow to find out the status. I apologize on behalf of OIT.
I’ll give you an update tomorrow.
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I totally agree with John and not only do they probably not want to pay for your college or want your time split further, they may be even intimidated that if you get a master it may be a higher degree level than they have or the same. Either way, they may not want the competition. You did the right thing, of course, in following your own heart and believing in yourself. You are the master of your own future. Better yet you are the architect of your own destiny. Go ahead and use your own knowledge, gut feeling, and lay out your own blue print to follow for your life. Like an architect you can adjust the blue print if you find that something doesn’t fit what you really want as you go along. Just remember to keep it balanced and strong…and the structure your life is building will hold up. Keep the faith.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks I may take you up on that offer. So, am I to understand that you got a job working for them or you applied but didn’t get the job or what? Just wasn’t sure what the outcome was.
I also read about another company that is in the organic food market called Eden Foods at http://www.organicconsumers.org/organlink.cfm and you may find it very interesting to read about them if yu don’t know about them already.
They lead me to read about a very interesting farm called Full Belly Farm that is leading the way in farming wholesome and organically using natural lanscaping and bee pollenation. We need to make a change with our handling of pollination of our crops before it is too late and we don’t have any food organic or not. They are just catching on to this fact as the situation gets worse and worse. I did a speech on the subject several years ago and no one seemed to realize their was a problem. My classmates were surprised at what I shared but I think as all in class speeches seem to do, it faded from their memories all to soon and they forgot the things I explained to them were things all of us need to remember to avoid hurting bees unintentionally. Now we are having bees die in large amounts and no one knows why. Most people don’t realize the sheer number of food items that are pollinated by bees and that will be at risk if this trend continues. This is what the news media are finally getting an idea about and reporting on a little too late. Where were they a few years ago when they should have been reporting on these changes? I don’t know why it has to get to tragic proportions and affect some big industries that they finally get a clue. Actually I do and it has to do with the all mighty dollar that those industries command. They want to produce more almonds, which are in high demand and they need more bees to pollinate their cash crops but there aren’t enough to go around and the costs of be farmers to haul them around the country to pollinate the huge numbers of farms is growing and they just don’t have enough. They are also having to move the bees to colder climates in the winter to protect them during the winter from disease and mixing with other breeds that may harm them.
As you can see I am passionate about this subject in many ways. So, I am right there with you. Talk away. I will listen and want to learn.
Sincerely,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I also feel that ‘the bottom should care.’ As you described, leaders are not necessarily ‘the top.’ Bo doing nothing, the culture remains the same. If it’s a culture one is satisfied with, then OK, but if not, small steps need to be taken, dialogue needs to happen, and a change in the culture will happen. Setting an example helps as well. Many people have selective hearing where they hear what they want to hear, but outward examples are hard to miss.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Even though top management may not demonstrate sincerity or concern in decision making in an organization, those at ground level should definitely care about performance and making a difference. You should not allow others to bring you down. Also, if a merger or company restructuring occurred, new management culture or attitudes towards bottom level employees may change significantly.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I feel that performance evaluations are important because they provide feedback to the employee. However, a forced distribution on the performance evaluation may be skewed by the personal biases of the supervisor. An employee needs feedback, whether positive or negative, to know the course of action over the next year. There should also be an opportunity for discussion afterwards with the employee and the supervisor that is meaningful and not done in haste.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Hoelzle, Carolyn
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Do you believe a forced distribution benefits the behavior of the organization? Is this a recommended way of determining the use of personal development plans? Why or why not? What impact might a forced distribution have on the motivation of the workers?
For some workers it may work by giving them a push and motivate them to attain goals. Others may view it as an insult and feel their work is not being viewed on a personal level.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
Is there any way that you could flip the positions, so that you were the leader, so that you were on top, so that you could be the one show shows caring, and make them mirror you?
Is it an impossible situation? Is there no chance that your dissenting voice, vocal or written, even in your departure, could make a difference for others?
I really want to understand, because as I look back on conflicts I encountered over the 100 jobs I had where the conflict ended in a bad work situation, I can now see so many ways I could have used the Mediator tools to make things better for everyone. But, I didn’t know about the tools at the time. I didn’t know what I could have done.
What conscious conversation styles could you choose? Maybe what you’re having now is a verbal brawl, but you might benefit from a council or a dialogue.
Are you using inquiry to figure out the reasons you’re in your situation? Have you asked the top how and why your views differ with those on top? Are you sure they actually differ, or is this an assumption that you have to be unearthed?
I could go through all 8, but you get the picture.
I just feel like it’s so… sad, and I think you could change things for the better if there was some mediation with your organization. It’s possible that they don’t want to take part in that mediation, in which case, you should definitely move on.
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Schwaikert, Christie
Date:Thursday, May 31, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee,
Whole Foods Market is absolutely unconventional. They have a decentralized leadership style that empowers team members to take care of business. Now that I have started to read MAVERICK, I see a lot of parallel theories that WFM shares with Semco. It reinforces how important it is to get employees to buy in on all levels. This creates unity and makes the organization stronger. Feel free to ask away with questions about WFM. I love to talk about the company and quite frankly my friends are tired of listening.;-)
CMS
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Nanni, Karen
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I believe the best motivators are positive reinforcement. Even a marginal performer works better with positive reinforcement than threats. There’s no doubt that this bell curve would motivate people to at least meet expectations, but i fear that people would do just enough to meet expectations but have no motivation to excel because of the negativity of the system. I’ve never experienced a bell curve like this (to my knowledge anyway) but I know that from my current position, I am driven to work hard and exceed expectations because of the positive reinforcement I get from my coworkers and superiors. We are not offered very much in the way of monetary motivation, but my ever-evolving project list and the knowledge that I will be recognized for my accomplishments makes my job rewards and enjoyable and keeps my productivity and efficiency high.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Both of your opinions are greatly appreciated as I do have an opposing view. It is neat to see the flip side of my own opinion and still be able to appreciate it just the same πŸ™‚
However, when it comes to an organization affiliation, I still believe, I reflect you, just as you reflect me. If you (the organization, those on top) don’t care……… ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Absolutely Robert and that is not to say that there wont be any challenges along the way because there will be more than enough and that is not to say that sometimes you may feel like giving up because some days, you will, but, ultimately, it is in your hands. How far and how long are you willing to go to grow and progress forward.
I really mean it when I say keep on keeping on and watch amazing things take place. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:York-Funchers, Tashira
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
As John stated the bottom level should care, even if the upper level does not. It is important for people to determine what they want out of life and be a leader not a follower. The way that someone or a group of people handle a situation should not effect how you feel yourself.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:York-Funchers, Tashira
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks Theresa, I never looked at it as a motivator you had given me a different view on the situation.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
That is amazing. Anyone who said that out loud as a deterrent to you going back to school has some ulterior motive, such as avoiding having to pay you for your extra education, keeping you from splitting your time between work, life, and school, or whatever, but if anyone truly believes that a graduate degree won’t affect one’s career, they’re being blissfully oblivious of the transformative powers of education. You will be changed. School’s like the borg. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Renee Lackey – Email Address?
Post:Re: Renee Lackie – Email Address?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Renee, if this continues looping, I’ll be happy to step in to escalate.
I want to ‘let the system work’, but I also want your issue resolved.
j.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:MacAuley, Robert
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree with you as well Kieanna. When it comes down to it you and you alone is responsible for your career path. Others may influence my direction or give suggestions but I only decide what I want to do. For example, if it was my dream to become a famous painter and others believed I don’t have the talent or skill, wouldn’t deter me from becoming a painter. Once a goal is set you must set forth, make a plan, execute the plan, and let no one tell you otherwise unless you alone feel the goal is unattainable.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I believe that the individual is ultimately responsible for charting one’s career path. If a person remains complacent in a career, or accepts a manager’s viewpoint or decision without questions or dissent, that person is then limited within confined boundaries. For example, I was told that a graduate degree would not impact my career advancement. Regardless of that insensitive statement, I was actually more determined and motivated to return to school in pursuit of learning and receiving a master’s degree in the future.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
I believe change can be positive in one’s career. Although loyalty and dedication have always been values of importance to me, over the years my views have somewhat changed. Growth, development, and a challenging work environment create enthusiasm, increase job knowledge and skills, and add value to the workplace.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Sandy, Elizabeth
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
In my opinion, based on personal experience, I feel that the forced distribution on a performance evalution decreases motivation and sometimes impacts a worker’s level of morale.I believe the performance evaluation may reflect the impartiality of the supervisor on the worker.In my own situation, I have worked at several organizations during my career and have always been rated as distinguished in my performance evaluation. However, in my current position, every year I have but a few marks of “distinction” and this was only after I mentioned this to my supervisor one year out of frustration. So after my conversation with him and emphasizing my accomplishments over the past year, instead of all “accomplished”, on the areas of performance, two out of nine areas were rated as distinguished. Although I have received very positive feedback from other management in different departments, parents, or letters of thanks from high school administrors, just to name a few sources in support of my concerns, his response continues to be dismissive. Consequently, I tend to believe my performance is based on personal and not factual consideration.
Elizabeth
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Daniel and Class,
Exactly, the system will definitely have averse affects on an organization by forcing managers to group employees in to predetermined categories. They absolutely are producing results that will be inaccurate so they may loose the cream of the crop they think they will be getting. However, maybe they only want the few who find it a challenge to live in a cut throat environment. Some people do find this kind of environment to there liking and think it will just help them rise to the top of some food chain faster. They just won’t realize that a forced distribution could get them too until it does. Then it will be too bad so sad. As I am illuding to, this type of environment does not lend to a colaborative environment but yet one of a cut throat environment where employees may even be tempted to reduce their value system or blur the lines to rise above the others and never end up in the bottom or near the bottom percentage. They may even take credit falsely for work that is not theirs if they can get away with it. So, do these companies really want this kind of employees or to create this kind of environment? Who knows.
So, yes I agree some employees find themselves in positions that don’t suit them but also in a value system that doesn’t suite them is they are honest and don’t choose to play the game any other way. They could be run over by those who will or they may get frustrated enough to get sucked into it. I think it is unfair to however many it happens to small or large. I think it could not only make them loose faith in this company but question the field as well and wonder if this is the way all companies of that market are the same and not only leave this company but that industry.
I agree that if the goal was to take an accurate snap shot of the organization there would not be a point of forcing the results and there shouldn’t be restraints on how many individuals should fall into each category. Rating employees accurately without having to fill all groups will provide better information on how the organizations is performing. That just seems to make sense and if their goal is to retain the cream of the crop they will be more likely to do so with the moral values of these employees intact.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim and Class,
Absolutely, there seems to be a common interpretation that Forced Distribution would surely cause frusttration and if people don’t feel what they are doing will truly benefit them, they are bound to feel a sense of ‘why bother’ attitude. Let me just do my time and look for something some where else, they are eventlually going to fire me so, I will beat them to the punch but I am not going to knock myself out trying to perform for someone who really doesn’t care how hard I try or that my work is really good, I am reliable and consistant. I will go where someone else values a good work ethic, but bide my time here while I do. So, in this sense they will become complacent but more than likely be watching for a way out and the door to be opened for them to leave.
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Marriott, Theresa
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tashira, I don’t think your weird at all, I’ve seen situations and have been in them where employees dealt with unfavorable work environments yet had a pride in themselves, what they produced and their accomplishments so were able to rise above what was around them and continue to do a great job and thus receive great reviews. I think there is a certain aspect in challenging ourselves and motivating ourselves that way when perhaps the working situation isn’t providing motivation and meeting needs. I think its a great coping and realistic way to rise above and endure until it is the right time for choices to become changes.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christie,
I have been reading about Whole Foods as well…interesting to see someone else post about them. Also, I whole heartedly agree with your assessment and your response.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:Week 2A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 2A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I spent a lot of time this week reflecting on past work situations and how the leadership I encountered in those positions changed my directions in that position. I really enjoyed doing the research for the paper and uncovered a lot of theories and ideas about how best to lead, motivate, and engage conflict.
I want to continue to examine the motivational theories I found and find practical ways to apply them in this position and the positions around me.
Continued thanks to Tim and class.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christie,
Every time I heard the question “Where do you see yourself in five years?” in an interview I think it was sort of like asking your question “Will you be able to attain Job Satisfaction?”
No matter how many times I answered the ‘right’ answer, e.g. “I’ll still be your groundskeeper.” or “Well, of course, I’ll be having my 5 year anniversary party with you.” I never actually could say “I’ll have your job by then” or “Oh, I’ll be back in school in a year”.
In interviews for more legitimate positions, I don’t recall being asked – I think it was assumed that I’d have job satisfaction occur magically.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Please don’t feed the students.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I love apples!
The feature is available as a setting per discussion forum, but sometimes instructors prefer to turn it off, as it can have a negative impact on the openness and candidness of posting. People get a sort of post-remorse.
I know of some teachers who have turned it on, then turned it off because everyone spent all their time editing and rephrasing old posts rather than making new ones, and it was a little like Orwell’s 1984, where history was constantly being rewritten.
Although you have legitimate reasons why you’d like the feature, other people might never be able to stop rewriting their posts, which can also lead to discontinuity between posts.
John is an instructional tech. πŸ˜‰
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction Jose Reyes
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I second Christie’s theory.
I’ve worked in factories of a few different types. In some I glued books, in some I punched metal, in some I counted boxes of boxes of boxes. I loved some, I hated some. I worked in a factory where we made plaques and awards, and it was a great job. I’m not sure why I loved it so much, but there were no perks, I had to punch a clock, the hours were long, and I sat in a cubicle all day without so much as a window. The skills necessary were few, the pay was bad, but I liked what I did. There was value in the people I worked with and the customers I worked for. I was valued and respected and given subtle praise and increasing responsibility.
I was never going to own the business or be a VP of sales there. I knew I’d be leaving at some point because it was no sort of career, but it was a great job, and I would have stayed there as long as I could. I ended up leaving rather abruptly because I overheard the owner of the company saying something to the effect of “If I was interested in having the best people working for me, I’d have to start from scratch.” He said it off the cuff to another worker there, and I think he was just in a bad mood that day, because he had never said anything so thoughtless before.
It might have even been true, I mean what would it take to have an entire team of skilled trophy builders? But it affected the way I viewed myself in that organization, and I left very shortly afterwards.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine,
Since my job is Blackboard, instructional technology, the use and implementation of technology in learning situations, a leadership role in OIT, and related topics, it’s very hard for me to see the line where the class starts and the job begins. I feel the same way about life, for the most part. My computer at home at 10 PM might as well be my work computer, as it is essentially a mirrored setup in applications, functions, and activity.
I am struggling a little bit with the issue of where that line lays, but I encounter the same struggle with things like Digg, twitter, HDTV, DVDs, YouTube, email, communication tools, gadgets, office documents, etc., because of the nature of my work. Everything in technology is open season for my work. Have I mentioned I have the best job in the whole wide world? My job satisfaction rating is off the chart.
I have no doubt that you and Kieanna and the rest of us are properly balancing the time spent in class and the time spent at work, but it becomes a personal question about whether it is affecting one’s job negatively or not, and I think for all of us in this particular discussion, it doesn’t.
I think the issue would be more cut and dry if we decided to take a nap on the boss’s dime, or take the day off and ‘forget’ to tell anyone, including disbursements. Spending a minute or two online to build leadership skills on a coffee break seems pro-work to me, especially in comparison to these other slacker activities. πŸ˜‰
John
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Adams, Lauren
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
To me, you are demonstrating significant contributing factors towards leadership potential – one being a high ethical standard and another being the ability to understand when to move on. I think you’ve done a very good job maintaining your ethics under a difficult situation as well as understanding it is better for you to move on to a different department (even if it does not involve an increase in monetary rewards – hopefully you will find better intrinsic rewards such as greater job satisfaction and more respect from fellow employees) – best of luck to you!
Lauren
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Christine!
Absolutely I’d say that I do a lot of following in my particular leadership style, now. It wasn’t always that way – I used to have a much more hard-lined view of the direction of leadership, and until I changed my style, I wasn’t leading anyone to anything. I was just directing people.
Although it may sound oxymoronic, I’d definitely say that good followship/fellowship is essential to good leadership.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna – thanks for taking the question in the manner it was intended – I think I knew your answer, but it was good to hear none the less. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree with Elizabeth here.
I think that professional development as a concept should be a part of everyone’s task list all the time. But I don’t think everyone sees it that way, and in a leadership role, when you are looking at the pros and cons of the people who look to you for leadership, you may find one or two who are showing some undeniable signs of need for professional development to you, co-workers, and customers, but they may not see the need for it in themselves.
Sometimes professional development has to be prescribed, rather than self-driven. Maybe we can take a cue from goal-making motivational theory and allow the worker to choose their own clear, challenging, and attainable development goals, but insist that some professional development be done by everyone in a given period.
Mandates like these seem to be antithetical to good leadership, though.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Now I really wish they had the feature that allows you to omit certain items because the apple tree example did not really have anything to do with my response but somehow, I felt compelled to put it in there.
It may be that I was very hungry this morning and I have yet to pick up something to eat and a apple could have really been a great pick me upper for the morning.
I do apologize for taking my hunger issues out on the postings. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Knowing how much and how interested I am in the courses that I am taking not to mention just knowing me, I would say yes.
When something is of interest to me, I take everywhere I go. I know that it wont disturb my work nor will it affect it in a negative manner. In fact, it creates a buffer between myself and the work world.
My line of work can sometimes get pretty hectic as well as stressful and by having something outside of work that I can attend to, truly is a stress buster for me.
That was a cool question John. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It should say the apple does not fall far from the apple tree.
I wish they would put the option to omit and fix postings like they had last summer for online classes. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
One thing to remember, that the apple usually does not fall far from the apple and those that do, usually are far because they have been pushed by other apples.
In the work world, especially in the sector that I am currently employed in, no matter how much praise, how many meetings that may occur on your behalf, it does not always have an impact thus creating the “I don’t make an impact” mentality.
Sure, you can keep going up the ladder and telling and showing all of your good deeds, but sometimes, it just does not make a difference. In my personal opinion, it gos back to some managers not knowing how to look outside of their own turf. Bringing me back to the question of if the top does not care why should the bottom? ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John – Good question and interesting too. I know for me I will take a few minutes at work on ‘my’ time, such as lunch hour or if I get a quick coffee break (like right now).
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Schwaikert, Christie
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
The presence or lack of employee recognition directly impacts job performance. This could make or break a company. Tons of research dollars and time are invested into determining what types of recognition employees value most. Some for profit companies solely exist to serve the need of helping other companies establish employee recognition programs. When I searched the internet for staff recognition in the workplace, over 500,000 hits appeared. That is a sign that whether or not it’s being implemented, the need for recognition has been acknowledged.
Recognition needs to be part of an organization’s business plan. Why? It’s the people the organization partners itself with that brings the business plan to fruition. Without the employees, the larger purpose wouldn’t be served. It’s imperative to recognize that the act of recognition must be genuine and sincere. Phony attempts to get ‘that’ over with will only contribute to poor morale and poor performances.
CMS
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Schwaikert, Christie
Date:Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kienna, Tim and Class,
I am right there with Kienna and agree that you are the MASTER of your own destiny. I think it’s important to recognize though that an individual’s success can also weigh heavily on who else they choose to engage on their career path. It is in the best interest of the individual to seek out the best possible mentor. The experience and guidance of this mentor will help the individual achieve their stated career goals. I wanted to work for Whole Foods Market because they have been recognized for their outstanding and unconventional leadership style. Whole Foods Market has also been on Fortune’s Top 100 companies to work for list for the last 10 years.
CMS
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Soles, Elizabeth
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I found the bell curve to be really interesting and it kind of reminded me of discussions at schools surrounding grade inflation. At Princeton before they implemented methods to curb grade inflation many students were concerned about its implications. I remember one concern was that it would create the mentality that everyone should look out for themselves and no one else and I feel like this bell curve in a work environment could create the same notion. Rather than promoting a collaborative work environment with healthy work relationships I would feel that it would create a feeling where employees wouldn’t want to work together because by working with someone or helping someone they could lose their spot to them in the upper tier.
Ultimately I think it depends on the person. Someone that’s competitive by nature is going to feel like they need to fight for their position. A less motivated person may feel hopeless and that there’s nothing they can really do to change it, so why bother.
I honestly can’t see the value in using a bell curve like that. Are there real-world examples where it’s been successful? I would assume it’s more common in companies that are focused on the bottom line and that care more about the results as opposed to how they achieve them.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:York-Funchers, Tashira
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna and John,
Yes, I agree continue to do your job but at a different pace so it is evident that something is wrong but I do not agree that the question should be changed. I had the same problem and I did not quit, I just made the move to a different position. People handle situations the best way to suit their needs and to keep her sanity that may have been the only way Kieanna could have handled it.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: Why should someone on the bottom care? – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
The bottom should care because leadership can occur outside of the hierarchical structure. Showing leadership outside of a structured leadership role or hierarchy can challenge and influence those in titled leadership roles and bring about real, important change.
I have an example, and it relies on the idea of situational leadership theory, where the leader, the led, the environment, and the conflict all allowed the solution to come about, but the leadership came from the middle of the hierarchy, not the top.
I am a manager, and I had a regular scheduled meeting with my VP. When I got to the meeting I found that a support tech was in with the VP, during my scheduled time. A different manager or VP might never have allowed such a breech of protocol, but our relations are fairly relaxed. I peeked in and made my VP aware that I was there, and she asked me to come in and hear what was being said, so I came in and sat down. For this situation to happen, the tech had to gather ideas, ask for time with the VP, going outside of the structure of hierarchy, and both the VP and me had to be willing to give up some scheduled time. Had the tech stayed within the bounds of titles and reporting structure, I don’t think the VP would have heard any of his ideas, filtered or otherwise, which is a different problem, likely to be addressed sometime soon.
What was essentially a spontaneous meeting for the tech and the VP became a mile high view planning session for ways to engage all of the people in our organization, starting with the people in our division, incorporating ideas gathered over time by the tech, feedback from users, and a willingness to listen on both the part of the VP and me. Several plans and directives were established, and all involved feel much better about the outlook for our organization.
This tech is a leader regardless of his title, and the VP is becoming aware of how to resolve some key conflicts due to his insights. He is quickly making us all aware of the fact that his title doesn’t match his thinking, and the VP will probably remedy that in time.
My point? I’d say that if you care, let someone who can do something know. If that’s not your supervisor, then find out who it is. Your view is too important to go unheard.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine,
I agree – in general, I think that openness and communication between leader and led will have all sorts of benefits, but job satisfaction on the part of the led is probably high on the list.
I have a weekly meeting with staff to review open questions, projects, and review status of goals, etc. We have some things that we do every week that are good patterns for communication, but my favorite is when I ask if they feel like they are being properly challenged. They know I’m going to ask it, and I’ve never gotten a negative response, but it’s a reminder to think about where they want to go with their work.
I believe that asking this weekly question was the reason that one employee in particular asked as one of their yearly PDP goals to pursue system administration knowledge and skills. I never would have known that they were ready for this step otherwise, and it was not necessarily evident that they were ready from other system administration related tasks, but now we have a regular training session on commands related to system administration and practical usage.
Without that open channel, prompts for challenge self assessment, and the willingness and courage on the employee’s part to grow, it might never have happened.
The responsibility you’re talking about is definitely shared.
John.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
I believe that you feel that you are doing a great job despite your feelings about how you’re being treated in the job.
However, it seems like you feel like doing your schoolwork on the laptop during work hours is not in the best interest of your job, or something you might not do if you were in a job you were making every effort to do your best in, but you’re doing it here to soothe yourself.
It seems like this fits into my response to Tim’s question that theorizes a job you don’t like will negatively affect your performance in it.
Would you still take out your laptop do do your schoolwork on the clock if you loved the job, your treatment, and your potential future?
This is getting interesting! πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
No it doesn’t and I feel for anyone who would have to endure such an analysis process. It reminds me of the classes where a professor says “I only give 3 A’s so the scale of grading changes by how well everyone in the class does” and no matter how good your work is, the coveted A may be out of your reach. I would not take a class like that. I like my A’s and don’t like a sliding upward scale like that. Life is too short to torture myself, challenge myself yes…not stress myself to death to meet the challenge that seems unreachable.
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi Tim and Class,
When all things are said and done, each individual is ultimately responsible for charting their own career path.
Although as we have been discussing that we feel good leaders would see the value in retaining a good employee rather than using Forced Distribution and looks at the whole when formulating his plan of leadership. I guess when you described in the lecture this was a IT company that basically sounded as if they needed to scale down due to what sounded like financial reasons, this to them was taking into consideration that they were doing what was best for all concerned and holding on to the cream of their crop rather than loose everyone. It didn’t seem to work though seeing that they had to have layoffs anyway.
Back to the new question though, I would suggest to someone who didn’t want to be put through that level of stress to stay where they were but put in resumes in other places that felt would suit there needs more after doing some research into what companies and their policies might suit them more. Then leave that stress behind. If all IT companies use a Forced Distribution type of analysis or assessment program then they should consider a new direction with their career. This could mean being an in house IT specialist at a non IT company, kind of like John does, or maybe finding somewhere they could teach IT possibly and maybe even a whole new direction if they are so inclined. Where one door closes another one opens or you find one that does or a way to make those doors open for you. Maybe new degree program by going back to college. Like we all are or move up the chain so they can affect change in the policies of the IT industry. They are only limited by their imagination and skills.
I personally loved doing property management because I could think I did it well and so did my residents…they were like extended family to me. However, the hours you had to deal with (no extra pay…the only industry that pays hourly but like salary and gets away with it) and the amount of work it usually entails because there is only two people, the manager and assistant manager who run huge properties, while doing every bit of the administrative duties and you might get lucky enough to be allowed to hire a part-time leasing person. Rarely do apartment management companies allow for an accountant, a secretary or a full-time leasing person…though they do exist. I saw one company in SC and one here in NJ but that was it. The rest want as much out of the least amount of people as possible. You deal with vendors, the maintenance staff, budgetting, and companies that you may rent corporate units to, and the renters and planning events as well as the schedules for all the above and desktop publishing/distribution….chief cook and bottle washer basically. And you know the old saying the assistant manager does all the work, well it is true in this field…that was me. When I had enough of being taken advantage of or so I felt, I took my career into my own hands and decided to finally go back to college and get my bachelors degree to do what I have always dream of doing, Multimedia Graphics. Determined to not quit as I had many years ago, for good reasons and with intentions of returning, I refused to let a fall down the stairs and subsequent injuries it caused stop me either and I made it…because I wanted to. It was all up to me and with the help of CCS, and many others at Rider I did. Thanks Christine and all of your staff. Anyway that was about as good of an example as any.
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John, I would never stop doing my job. I will slow how fast I would normally get it done simply because I choose to do so. However, I will still maintain high dignity in any and everything that I have on my desk. And to make matters even more so, I was approached by a different manager, within my same department for another interview this week. But by being offered the interview, which will again move me to a different unit, does this mean I do not care about my current position? No, not at all in fact, I will make it my business to complete everything so that the other person that I work with (my supervisor) will not be overwhelmed should I receive the new position. Will I still be frustrated at how work is being handled within the office? Probably and to sooth myself I will pull out my laptop and work on my school material should I need to take a break or better yet, continue to improve the next unit I may move to (which is a unit I have been in in the past).
It boils down to how you handle yourself in situations. No matter how hard or frustrated I may get at the process or problems, I always remember, tomorrow is another day to make change. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna and Tashira
Thanks for opening my eyes about this – I guess I figured that if someone didn’t enjoy what they were doing, that it might negatively affect their performance, but you prove otherwise.
However, it does appear that in Kieanna’s case, at least, it led to what might be considered the worst possible job performance – quitting. I’m not saying that you are not doing your job, but you’d agree that you’re going to stop doing your job, right? My point is – if you are good at what you’re doing, but you dislike it so much that you quit, I might revise my theory to say that Tim’s question doesn’t matter so much – the new question might be “if you hate your job so much that you have to quit, does it matter how you perform at it for the remaining time you’re there?” πŸ˜‰
Thanks for your insight!
John
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:York-Funchers, Tashira
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John,
It just so happens that I hated the records room that I worked in, but every evaluation I got was exceptional. Although I did not like the job I always set my goals high and every recorded time they had for every task I beat with ease. Once I accomplished this I went back to the regular time, I think it was a personal thing with me being competitive. When you have competitive spirit even if you do not like what you are doing you try to be the best. Maybe its just me and I’m a little weird.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I believe that an individual’s career path is in his/her own hands. An organization may provide some assistance to an individual along the way. For example, sometimes we find that the career or organization we’ve chosen is not the right one for us. I have seen individuals working in accounting who realize that accounting and the corporate environment is not for them, and they change paths to elementary school teaching, for example. In order for me to advance in my career, I needed to complete my bachelor’s degree.
It’s important to continually assess where we are in our careers and what we need to do to move up or out of the career we are in. There are tests that individuals can take (Myers-Briggs) that can also help determine a career path.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I believe when all is said and done, the ultimate ruler of your career path is you.
Chose to take on a new job if you feel so without fear. This is something that I am currently working on. Never become so comfortable that you refuse to look toward new unheard of goals and dreams.
~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hey John, I am an example of a person who really does not like what they are currently doing but I am great at it and I can say this because my current supervisor is having a hard time with me advising her that I will be going on an interview for a different area within our department.
She keeps coming up to me asking if it was her or what is it that she could do to keep me from going if I were to receive the job. I quickly advise her that it is not about the money (the new position is like a $40 raise, so trust me it is not for the money). I seek a new position due to how those in the field are treated versus those currently in my office who do the same work.
For instance, if you work in the field, you can send in your work any way that you choose to my office. You answer to no one and if someone complains on you, simply head to the director and she will make sure they get off your back and did I mention, you will receive praise and recognition a lot faster outside of this office? Who wouldn’t want to live life like this?
I thought my current supervisor did not pay much attention to how fast and how well I caught on to my current duties, but once she saw me send her an email stating that I was scheduled for an interview, the tide changed. Now she verbally praises me and tells me how she really wishes I not leave and I have not even been offered the job.
The site of the work on my desk makes me go online and work on my school projects just as I am doing now as I receive more satisfaction from participating in my class than sifting through the piles of work, that is sent in incorrectly and I chase down people to get the correct information only to find out that they knew it was wrong when they sent it but did not care, on a daily basis. ~Kieanna
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Nini, Diana
Date:Tuesday, May 29, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I don’t agree that it could work against an employee. I feel as though if you include the individual on making a plan that is suitable for them and their specific needs, they will be able to come up with a plan that will be beneficial to achieving their goals rather than detrimental. I don’t consider this as setting restraints, I view it as settng expectations that may not always be aware to the employees. let me know what you think
Thread:Memorial Day Tribute
Post:Re: Memorial Day Tribute
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Our thoughts are with you, Kieanna.
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine and class,
Or, the forced distribution can cause frustration and complacency, as people assume there is little chance to be recognized, and thus, the will live up (or down) to people’s expectations.
Thoughts? Reactions? Question? Examples?
Tim Glaid
5/28/2007
—– forwarded
Tim,
Wouldn’t this type of evaluation lead to more conflict within the organization and its teams or groups? It sounds like competition among workers would be fierce and it could become a dog-eat-dog environment to work in, which is not a health, supportive, learning work environment.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John and class,
When all things are said and done, who is ultimately responsible for charting one’s career path? What suggestions can you offer an individual, for mapping out his or her personal career trajectory?
Please share examples to help illustrate your response.
Tim Glaid
5/28/2007
——- forwarded
I have never heard of forced distribution, but it sounds tough to sell. I don’t believe, for instance, that it’s a change that would escape resistance in organizations like Rider’s. It seems like the system you’re describing is designed to fail, despite it sounding like it’s designed on paper to celebrate and foster success.
If you absolutely must add people to each category, it means that even with a team of perfectly matched, hard working people, you have to find 10-15% of them who need improvement whether they do or not. This seems unfair, and was likely seen by employees that way too. Morale and enthusiasm must have suffered. Can leadership thrive where followers are fearful? Where there’s stress and strain, does work flow easier? I doubt it.
Suppose we had a similar system in this class, where 10-15% of us absolutely had to be placed in a failing column, with an opportunity to do an extra credit project in order to bring ourselves up to par. How would that go over? How would the students feel about the mandate? Would it lead to more successes, or a 10-15% population who felt that they were asked to jump hoops? How would it affect the joy of learning and experimentation that allows good work to be done?
We do have a similar rating structure in our PDP, where people are rated in various areas where they might excel or ‘need improvement’ but termination isn’t directly related or mandated by the PDP. These ratings are used in conjunction with previous goals and the strategic plan in order to focus on weak areas and find ways to improve them, as well as to celebrate and reinforce stronger areas, and find ways to continue them. Also, not everyone at Rider uses the PDP to its best effect, or feels like I do, that it can be used as a great morale building tool rather than an ominous report on one’s ‘progress’.
Every time I hear about something like this, I’m grateful I work where I do. I feel like this kind of mandated curve likely makes people feel agitated, competitive amongst themselves, and disenfranchised. I would. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Schwaikert, Christie
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine & Marybeth,
After reviewing your postings and thinking about the weight of performance reviews and evaluations, Herzberg’s two factor motivation theory comes to mind. His research revealed that there are two factors that influence employees in the workplace. They are hygiene factors (working conditions, salary, company policies) and motivation factors (achievement, recognition, growth) (Acuff, Wood, 2004, pp.193-194). Hygiene factors must be maintained in order to prevent dissatisfaction, however, alone they can not motivate employees. Hygiene factors create a safe environment where employees trust leadership and have few grievances. Maintaining acceptable hygiene factors promotes an environment where employees can thrive and are motivated to improve their job performance. Clearly, Merrill Lynch was not focusing on hygiene factors. As a result, they did not promote an atmosphere conducive to employee development and growth.
CMS
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Consiglio, Marybeth
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chris, it was a very stressful 6 years at Merrill. From the day I was hired in 1998 to work on Y2K code until my group came under the axe, we never knew if it was going to be you who was next. And my group was re-assigned 3 times, so that always made it worse – we never knew if they’d get rid of the “new guys” or keep us because we were new. There were a lot of perks at Merrill, but you have to pay in one way or another, and the threat of layoffs was part of the price of working there.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
Wouldn’t this type of evaluation lead to more conflict within the organization and its teams or groups? It sounds like competition among workers would be fierce and it could become a dog-eat-dog environment to work in, which is not a health, supportive, learning work environment.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Marybeth,
The work environment you described at Merrill Lynch sounds disheartening at the least. Was there a lot of fear among the workers since it seems that even if an individual was a good worker, s/he could get a bad review just to make the numbers work. Also doesn’t sound like a good motivational tool for employees who weren’t necessarily ranked according to their actual performance.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I had not heard of forced distribution until now, but it does not seem fair to me. I would compare it to a recent conversation I had with a student who received a grade of C in a course. This individual believed her grades throughout the course merited close to an A. She contacted the professor to discuss her grade. The faculty said that it wouldn’t look good if all of the students had A’s and B’s so he had to give some students a C grade, and he randomly selected those students. Fortunately for this student, she had a legitimate argument that she did not earn the C, and the faculty changed her grade to an A- which was what all of her coursework added up to. Like the forced distribution of employee rankings in an organization, this forced distribution of grades was not fair to all students in the class. Is forced distribution of employee rankings used just to be sure not everyone gets a top evaluation?
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Cumming, Daniel
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This system could work against an organization in a few different ways. By forcing managers to group employees in to predetermined categories you are producing results that will be inaccurate. To meet the breakdown for each group some employees may fall into categories which do no suit them. Even if this only happens to a few employees it is still unfair to them. This could cause employees to lose faith in the practices of the company, especially if someone were to fall into one of the lower categories if they didn’t belong there.
If the goal was to take an accurate snap shot of the organization what would be the point of forcing the results? I don’t think there should be restraints on how many individuals should fall into each category. Rating employees accurately without having to fill all groups will provide better information on how the organizations is performing.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Marriott, Theresa
Date:Monday, May 28, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
To me this is not a benefit but counter-productive to the team oriented leadership and organizational trend today. In this situation the organizations won’t uncover the real problems; bad employees could be kept so there will be someone to cut; there could be legal consequences:
“The company lost because it couldn’t prove that the forced distributions it created led to valid measures of individual performance. Recently, Ford, reacting to the same problem, abandoned its forced distribution system after the company was threatened with lawsuits.The company lost because it couldn’t prove that the forced distributions it created led to valid measures of individual performance. Recently, Ford, reacting to the same problem, abandoned its forced distribution system after the company was threatened with lawsuits.” (Strategy + Business, para. 6).
poor performers may not be properly identified; large turnover rates could occur; the cost of rehiring will be high; and an overall destruction of teamwork could occur.
As for the employees stress levels will be very high, unhealthy level of competitiveness, they won’t ask each other for help, will be hesitant to share information, and will be afraid to ask for or go for training. This process is detrimential to the factors that motivate employees and teamwork and could destroy high levels of productivity.
There is an excellent article on this and it can be viewed:
http://news.com.com/The+folly+of+forced+rankings/2009-1069_3-950200.html
I personally have never worked for an organization that used the “bell” type of system for determining ranking but during my working career but wonder if companies that utilize this also determine raises and merits on who is in the highest percentage?
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Reyes, Jose
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Charles,
Bell curbs indeed seem to overlook I believe the work that someone may put forth into their job, thus it only averages out the overall performance of that company. That may in fact be acceptable say if the job at hand is for example, factory worker, where their job simply is to do this and move on to the next. However, when you dealing with a job that may require a more in depth analysis of a project, or where the job itself calls you to go beyond the title of your position, the bell curb would not fit this company because of you said Charles it awards the workers themselves no merit to their job. It will then create a sense of feeling like there is no purpose for them at there job, ultimately resulting that person to feel inadequate and possible depressed. Hence, when that happens performance will then falter and ultimately so too will that person. Thanks Charles.
Jose Reyes
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Weatherspoon, Charles
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This idea of forced distribution seems rooted in capitalism. In some strange way I believe management felt they were fostering competition between the employees to perform at their top-level because they were not being evaluated based on merit, but in comparison to the work of other employees. I believe they felt this gave the company a competitive advantage and that this ranking system would allow them to have the best workers available.
I doubt the employees felt the same way and this more than likely would have an adverse effect leading to decreased productivity and morale.
Thread:W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction
Post:Re: W2AQ2 – Job Satisfaction – LeMasney.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
If you love what you are doing in a task, a job, a lifestyle, or a project, I believe you’re more likely to succeed in it.
Job satisfaction is tied pretty directly to worker performance, in my experience.
Someone whose greatest ambition in life is to sing on a stage is going to likely have some trouble working in a cubicle with low light, drafts, and little human interaction for the rest of their lives. If they’re not satisfied with what they’re doing, no matter the money or the perks, they’re not likely to go above and beyond and be a stellar performer in their job.
If there’s someone who absolutely loves the smell of trash, or had a long family history in the trash carting business and beloved memories of dad’s stained uniform, or has a personal connection with driving a trash truck and therefore fulfilling their societal responsibility, then it’s likely that they will have the ability to exceed expectations in the carting of trash.
If someone gets involved in an industry like the medical profession, and got in because their family wanted them to, or because of the lure of good money, or the illustrious lifestyle, or some personal belief that doctors wear the title like a badge, rather than getting into it for the love of people and humanity, or to help people, or to ‘fix things’, it’s likely that even if they get past all the other barriers to success in that profession, they may become undone by their own lack of job satisfaction.
I think that if you are doing something for some other reason than some degree of love for what you do, it will be hard to sustain the enthusiasm that often accompanies a great job performer.
I’ve been in positions where I loved the job and the tasks and the physical environment, but some of the people I worked with were openly racist, and so it negatively affected my work until I was forced to leave. I would therefore go further to say that even in cases where job satisfaction is covered in a lot of areas in a position, a single important job satisfaction event or set of criteria can counter all of the positives to lead to failure.
Can anyone tell me of situations where they hated a job, but were great at it? I think I may be blinded by my own experiences here.
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Consiglio, Marybeth
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim, I’m curious if the organizations in which you’ve encountered the bell curve are all high-tech companies? I can say from experience that the Merrill Lynch IT department I worked in used the bell curve forced-distribution when ranking employees during performance evaluations. Managers would initially rate their employees based on performance then provide a rating for each employee. Then the managers would meet with their peers within the larger department and compare their ratings and create a new list. So employees weren’t only rated against those within their specific division, they would be ranked against other divisions, and if there weren’t enough employees within a certain rating group, ratings could be changed to make the distribution work.
I can see where the management thinking might be that if an employee is rated low, they’ll work harder to reach the next level and bring up their game, and for the most part, that happened. However, there were circumstances where employees quit after a bad rating, and maybe that was what Merrill was looking for too – attrition through bad reviews without firings/layoffs. Anyway, I don’t think Merrill went as far as putting a 30-60 day turnaround time resulting in termination. Often, the employee had until their next review to bring up their level of performance. The thing with Merrill though was that for a long period of time, there were mass layoffs every 6 months, due to the changes in both technology and the stock market, and the people who were laid off weren’t necessarily the ones with the bad performance evaluations.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I have never heard of forced distribution, but it sounds tough to sell. I don’t believe, for instance, that it’s a change that would escape resistance in organizations like Rider’s. It seems like the system you’re describing is designed to fail, despite it sounding like it’s designed on paper to celebrate and foster success.
If you absolutely must add people to each category, it means that even with a team of perfectly matched, hard working people, you have to find 10-15% of them who need improvement whether they do or not. This seems unfair, and was likely seen by employees that way too. Morale and enthusiasm must have suffered. Can leadership thrive where followers are fearful? Where there’s stress and strain, does work flow easier? I doubt it.
Suppose we had a similar system in this class, where 10-15% of us absolutely had to be placed in a failing column, with an opportunity to do an extra credit project in order to bring ourselves up to par. How would that go over? How would the students feel about the mandate? Would it lead to more successes, or a 10-15% population who felt that they were asked to jump hoops? How would it affect the joy of learning and experimentation that allows good work to be done?
We do have a similar rating structure in our PDP, where people are rated in various areas where they might excel or ‘need improvement’ but termination isn’t directly related or mandated by the PDP. These ratings are used in conjunction with previous goals and the strategic plan in order to focus on weak areas and find ways to improve them, as well as to celebrate and reinforce stronger areas, and find ways to continue them. Also, not everyone at Rider uses the PDP to its best effect, or feels like I do, that it can be used as a great morale building tool rather than an ominous report on one’s ‘progress’.
Every time I hear about something like this, I’m grateful I work where I do. I feel like this kind of mandated curve likely makes people feel agitated, competitive amongst themselves, and disenfranchised. I would. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1BQ4 – Conflict
Post:Re: W1BQ4 – Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I was specifically saying that my example and definition of organizational conflict was ‘in conflict’ with her definition. πŸ˜‰
j.
Thread:PAPER #1 Due – May 29, 2007
Post:Re: PAPER #1 Due – May 29, 2007
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
There it was, right under my nose.
Thanks for the clarification!
John.
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John and class,
In my previous organizations, the managers were directed to utilize a “bell curve” (no pun intended) to determine the rating and ranking of each person within the organization. The system went as follows:
5 – 7% of the population far exceeds expectations
10-15% of the population exceeds expectations
50 – 70% of the population meets expectations
10 – 15% of the population needs improvement
The downside of this system was that each manager had to fulfill each category. And those employees falling into a needs improvement rating were placed on a personal development plan and given 30-60 days to improve, or were terminated.
Do you believe a forced distribution benefits the behavior of the organization? Is this a recommended way of determining the use of personal development plans? Why or why not? What impact might a forced distribution have on the motivation of the workers?
Please cite examples to help illustrate your response.
Tim Glaid
5/27/2007
——- forwarded
A lot of what I do in the Center for Innovative Instruction at Rider University is in response to a need for faculty development, typically in technology, and so I found Tim’s discussion questions and lecture particularly apropos and useful this week. Thanks!
Boredom or listlessness is a great indicator for a need for a program of professional development and growth. I personally feel that if you have an organizational member who is twiddling their thumbs, one of the problems may be that they are looking for professional development to spark their abilities, give them a reason to generate new business, and to find productive ways to spend their idle time, such as development related research.
An inability to do the job, or a sudden inability to do the job due to new developments in the field is a good indicator for the need for a development program. If an organizational member has the development resources to pursue new skills in their area of expertise, they’ll always have a way to find out how to overcome new knowledge hurdles.
A lack of awareness of new skills, concepts, or abilities is a good indicator of the need for development. As one of my colleagues likes to say whenever I tell her about a new technology I’m excited about, “Sometimes you don’t know what you don’t know.” Professional development is one of the ways that you can keep abreast of the latest trends and ideas in your expertise.
Confusion or a lack of direction in a worker is a good indicator of the need for professional growth and development. Rider’s Performance Development Plan, which, when used to develop a useful and pertinent set of quantifiable goals, can be a powerful directional tool. When someone has goals defined and is still confused about how they should be accomplishing their job in the best way to help the organization, professional growth and development can be just the thing to provide a larger picture of direction.
John.
Thread:W1BQ4 – Conflict
Post:Re: W1BQ4 – Conflict
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Interesting definition and I guess a virus can be as good of a metaphor as any definition for an organizational conflict. But as the one example that John gave where it was not a malicious act or something meant to be destructive but just two different departments choosing the same name for different projects and posting ads around the same time that was confusing everyone. This would seem more like a typo in computer metaphors than a virus, but John LeMasney’s example to Christine was definitely an organizational conflict but doesn’t fit your definition in my opinion. Just a thought.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W2AQ1 – Growth & Development
Post:Re: W2AQ1 – Growth & Development – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Sunday, May 27, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
A lot of what I do in the Center for Innovative Instruction at Rider University is in response to a need for faculty development, typically in technology, and so I found Tim’s discussion questions and lecture particularly apropos and useful this week. Thanks!
Boredom or listlessness is a great indicator for a need for a program of professional development and growth. I personally feel that if you have an organizational member who is twiddling their thumbs, one of the problems may be that they are looking for professional development to spark their abilities, give them a reason to generate new business, and to find productive ways to spend their idle time, such as development related research.
An inability to do the job, or a sudden inability to do the job due to new developments in the field is a good indicator for the need for a development program. If an organizational member has the development resources to pursue new skills in their area of expertise, they’ll always have a way to find out how to overcome new knowledge hurdles.
A lack of awareness of new skills, concepts, or abilities is a good indicator of the need for development. As one of my colleagues likes to say whenever I tell her about a new technology I’m excited about, “Sometimes you don’t know what you don’t know.” Professional development is one of the ways that you can keep abreast of the latest trends and ideas in your expertise.
Confusion or a lack of direction in a worker is a good indicator of the need for professional growth and development. Rider’s Performance Development Plan, which, when used to develop a useful and pertinent set of quantifiable goals, can be a powerful directional tool. When someone has goals defined and is still confused about how they should be accomplishing their job in the best way to help the organization, professional growth and development can be just the thing to provide a larger picture of direction.
John.
Thread:PAPER #1 Due – May 29, 2007
Post:Re: PAPER #1 Due – May 29, 2007
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
I’m looking for any details you might have on what you’re expecting in terms of length, depth, number of words, etc. for these papers.
I haven’t seen this level of assignment detail anywhere in the course or the syllabus, though I’ve seen the paper assignment and due dates in a few places, and so if it exists, I’m sorry, I just missed it.
I don’t want to write a 2 page paper if you’re looking for a 10 page paper, and vice versa. That being said, I think it might be exceptionally hard to write a 10 page paper just on one’s definition of leadership without going very deep, peripherally. I’m prepared to do it, if that’s what you want. πŸ˜‰
This is especially pertinent for me, since after seeing other people’s weekly summaries for week 1, I realize I went way overboard with my week 1 summary. I also saw, after posting my summary as an attachment, that you asked for no attachments in the weekly forums in the syllabus – I’m very sorry about that, and it won’t happen again.
I’m quite excited about the paper – I just want the request and the response to be in sync.
Hope you are having a nice holiday!
John.
Thread:Week 1B Summary -Thread
Post:Re: Week 1B Summary -Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Wow – Charles,
That sounds pretty interesting – like you have had some sort of enlightenment in terms of how to manage your work life.
Do you have any specific examples you can share to illustrate the idea that “if one removes what should happen and be receptive to what is happening you can remove stress and conflict from both your work and personal life”?
It sounds like some scales fell from your eyes, so to speak.
John.
Thread:W1BQ4 – Conflict
Post:Re: W1BQ4 – Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I would think that, as leaders, we’d all want to have a win/win scenario as an outcome for conflict.
In my own example of organizational conflict where two board members have a list of disagreements about how an organization should be run, I would think that applying mediation tools properly would lead to a list of compromises or a balanced outcome, rather than any sort of ‘landslide victory’ for one board member or another. Why bother having more than one board member if only one is going to have their view represented? Why have a board at all – just elect the winning board member as president/dictator.
I think that wanting anything other than a win/win outcome is probably a vote for power mongering – not leadership.
John.
Thread:Week 1B Summary -Thread
Post:Re: Week 1B Summary -Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I feel like I’m really starting to guage the personalities of the people in this class now, and I’m very much continuing to enjoy the discussions.
I’ve really been enjoying the Gerzon text, and feel like as each mediator’s tool is revealed and discussed, that problems that have plagued me for years suddenly seem like they could be solved with time, effort and an open mind.
I’ve had a lot of opportunity through unofficial mentoring sessions with colleagues and co workers to discover a lot of what people see as the problems with their work and work relationships. After reading Gerzon, I see these as organizational conflicts. Before I would listen and nod, feel sympathy, give suggestions about what I might do in their bad situation, etc, but with the mediation tools, so many more options are available.
For instance, by applying inquiry, I might start to brainstorm with the mentee and develop a list of 20 questions to get to the heart of the conflict.
By applying integral vision, I might ask them to help me define who they thought the people who were affected by their conflict were, and then ask them how some other people or groups in the organization or outside of the organization might be affected.
By applying presence, I might ask them if they feel like part of the conflict is the attitude that they are harboring about the history of the conflict, or the fatigue from an unrelated project, or their focus when discussing the issues.
I feel like I am gaining options I didn’t know I had before, and I’m growing more confident in applying these tools in real world situations as I become more familiar with them.
I also got out a few books this week, including Stogdill’s Handbook of Leadership, and I’ve really enjoyed this sometimes difficult to process, but clearly renowned, text on leadership.
Thanks to Tim and class for another great ‘week’.
John.
Thread:W1BQ4 – Conflict
Post:Re: W1BQ4 – Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine,
Where you say ” Organizational conflict is an antagonistic interaction where one individual tries to thwart the goals or work of another.” I was thinking of it as potentially being much less intentional.
For instance, let’s say that you and I were both separately working on projects that used the name “Reaching Out at Rider” or something like it. The projects have no relation other than the name, and have already begun advertising, and the community is starting to get confused. For obvious reasons, both of us might want to keep the name for our own project, but one of us will have to give it up, or we’ll need to work creatively together to bring the two projects together, or to have subtext that clearly states the differences between the two efforts. It’s clear that it was only a case of bad planning or bad research or bad timing or whatever, but it certainly wasn’t intentional or antagonistic – but we still have to fix it, or suffer both projects failing due to bad marketing.
We might use mediation tools to resolve it, and in my opinion it is organizational conflict without your requirement of one person or group specifically thwarting another, though I think that that would definitely fall under my definition of organizational conflict too. It’s just that your example is more explicit. πŸ˜‰
Thread:W1BQ4 – Conflict
Post:Re: W1BQ4 – Conflict
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think of organizational conflict as any conflict that potentially stops the leader’s, managers’ and followers’ goals from being executed. I have found it helpful to think of these conflicts in story plot terms, such as person vs. person, person vs. nature, person vs. self, etc.
For instance, some examples of organizational conflict where the conflict is person vs. person might be two board members with a list of disagreements about how an organization is run, a customer and a support manager that are at odds over the scope and level of service being given, or a community leader who has been using funds from a treasury in ways that are questionable. Maybe the last one is person vs. self.
In my own life, I am starting to apply Gerzon’s mediator tools of bridging, inquiry, presence, integral vision and systems thinking to my role at Rider, where there has been various levels of communication breakdowns between my group and other groups, between members of my group, and between myself and people above and below me in the structure. I used to think that this was the natural evolution of the organization: that communications improved and degraded between different groups over time, based on hires and fires, events, and other phenomena. I think now that by using mediation tools that you can make an effort towards keeping a strong line open between most elements within and outside of a working group. Right now, I see it as a repairing effort – to find and fix various broken bridges across my address book. I see using mediation tools long term as a maintenance effort, where relationships and partnerships are consistently reevaluated to maintain open lines of discussion, and improve workflow.
John.
Thread:W1BQ3 – Resistance to Change
Post:Re: W1BQ3 – Resistance to Change
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Great responses!
I would say first that the change itself affects the potential resistance. For instance, when Rider implemented half day Fridays in the summers, there qwas very little resistance, though in my group, there was some grumbling that there would be less time to get the summer projects done. This complaint still appears from time to time, but generally speaking, this particular change was well supported for obvious reasons, including but not limited to the environmental benefits of shutting down the campus, increases in paid personal time, etc.
That being said, less easily swallowed changes are difficult for many reasons, like those shown in Marybeth’s shared article.
In groups I’ve been in that have faced and resisted change, a fear of the unknown, potential extra effort on the part of those affected by the change, and confusion have been some reasons behind the resistance.
A leader can counter these kinds of issues by making sure that inquiry is part of the process – asking more questions can quell confusion and fear of the unknown, for instance. Making sure that the change is supported in terms of time, money, and effort, whenever possible (in non emergent situations, for instance) goes a long way towards making those who are affected by the change feel supported too.
John.
Thread:W1BQ2 – Historical/Modern Leadership Principles
Post:Re: W1BQ2 – Historical/Modern Leadership Principles
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Based on Tim’s recommendation in Lecture 1, I went and borrowed a copy of Stodgil’s Handbook of Leadership to examine some of the theories in detail.
Given our in class discussion of things like ‘charisma’ as requirements for leaders, I thought that Trait Theory seemed like a long existing theory that held that same belief. Popularized in the late 1920s, Trait Theory of Leadership says that certain persona qualities occur more often in leaders than in non-leaders, and include such variable attributes as weight, age, energy level, physique, presence, and intelligence. Of course in modern views, this theory more or less seems to see anyone who is soft spoken, wheelchair bound, or ugly as less able to lead, which I think most of us would agree is ridiculous.
A more modern leadership theory that contrasts pretty well with Trait Theory is Fieders 1967 Interaction-Expectation (1950-1970) based theory known as the Contingency Theory of Leadership (Stodgil, p.21) where the social interactive abilities of a leader, which might be more “socially distant (work-oriented)” or more “highly sociable (interaction-oriented)”, are more or less likely to be effective depending on the leadership problem or situation at hand.
Where the trait theory seems to support the idea that you have to have certain traits in order to be a good leader, contingency theory appears to say that depending on the traits you have, you’ll be a better leader if given the opportunity to lead in a situation that matches your particular ‘strengths’. I like to think that anyone can be a good leader, given the right knowledge, situation, and an opportunity where they are matched to the leadership task well.
Tim, thanks for letting us know about the Handbook of Leadership. It’s dusty, but a very good read for our topic.
John.
Thread:Happy Memorial Day Weekend
Post:Re: Happy Memorial Day Weekend
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 26, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim and class,
Thanks to everyone for a great class so far, and I hope you all have a safe and reflective holiday.
Here’s to remembering the service of all of our armed forces, and to the sacrifices they’ve made.
John.
Thread:W1BQ1 – Compare & Contrast
Post:Re: The self as business – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Friday, May 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi John and Diana,
I also loved the line “He will remain a member of my own personal board of directors through my life and career.” I thought wow, what a statement. I have always thought about those in our lives who make a contribution to who we are in our everyday lives in some small or large way. I believe everyone influences our lives and help mold us into the people we are. However, after reading your statement, I thought how awesome it would be if we all had more than just the influence of those who pass through our lives, but if we each had someone we could call a board of directors throughout our lives. You are a very blessed person to have found such a mentor.
Further more, I think I like the way you think, especially of your life like that of a corporation with a board of directors. Wow, what an image, that must mean you have one heck of a vision for your life, as that of a vision equal to a corporation and the the goals this vision would create would be pretty awesome. Thanks for the visual metophor to ponder and contemplate my own vision of my life. I would like to think big like this.
Sincerely,
Renee Lackie
Thread:LECTURE 2 – Week 1B
Post:Re: LECTURE 2 – Week 1B
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, May 25, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim – where you say:
“If a manager had only to be efficient, life would be easy, if he had only to be efficient, life would still be easy, but the two pull at each other and the manager has to accomplish both in order to be productive.”
I’m sure you meant your first use of ‘efficient’ to read ‘effective’ to mirror your previous sentence:
“Briefly put we say that a manager’s job is to be effective, that is to achieve the goals and objectives of the organization and at the same time be efficient, and that means to make good use of limited organizational resources to achieve organizational goals.”
I’m hoping you were testing us. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Jose, and class,
You can use Microsoft’s free PowerPoint Viewer to see PowerPoint without having the full application installed:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=428D5727-43AB-4F24-90B7-A94784AF71A4&displaylang=en
Alternatively, you can download and install the great OpenOffice suite which not only can read Microsoft Office documents, like PowerPoint slideshows, but it can create and edit them too.
http://openoffice.org
Thread:Scorecard Reports
Post:Re: Scorecard Reports
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Tim,
I saw the sample in your post. I think what Kieanna might be asking is where should we expect to find our own individual scorecard – will you be delivering it in email, for instance? I’m assuming you won’t also be using Bb’s built in gradebook to deliver grade updates? If I’m wrong, my apologies, Kieanna.
John.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 24, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that the qualities that help one to be a great leaders include qualities of character. If the goal of an effective leader is to motivate others, as Tim and others have said, and I agree, then it could be also said that being viewed as bitter or vindictive or maniacal, or powermongering would work against that leadership.
If “An Inconvenient Truth” was, instead, a film named “Those stupid, stupid litterbugs doing the pollution jitterbug” and tried to get the same message across by showing an unhinged man shouting loaded obscenities for two hours about the companies and individuals and science behind global warming instead of what I thought was a measured, organized, sort-of-sweet, poetic treatment of the topic, it might not have been seen by so many of the people who viewed it as effective, or Gore as a leader.
I think of “An Inconvenient Truth” as cross cultural, big picture thinking, leadership in motion, and an effort to motivate people towards a goal. I see it as a reaction to conflict between man and the nature of man and nature itself. I see Gore as a mediator and the conflict as one that effects everyone that we know of.
But, everyone has an opinion. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1BQ1 – Compare & Contrast
Post:The self as business – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Diana, I absolutely love the line “He will remain a member of my own personal board of directors through my life and career.”
It made me think: What if we all ran ourselves as if we were multimillion dollar corporations? Or municipalities? Or megachurches? πŸ˜‰
Who are your customers? How are you providing support? Who is your CEO? Are you in the red or the black, emotionally speaking?
What new construction projects will you undertake next year? Will they involve internal restructuring, purely superficial facade changes, or just some landscaping?
John.
Thread:Week 1A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 1A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Shaun – you’re not the only one who feels a benefit in this kind of forum, certainly. I really like the freedom it provides. Could you imagine how many hours upon hours upon hours it would take to try and have a verbal discussion like this in the physical and time based confines of a classroom meeting?!
Trying to have all of these thoughts come out clearly without verbal editing and stammering, and without interruption seems like an impossible dream in the 3-hours-a-week-in-a-hot-room-at-7-pm scenario.
Viva la discussion! It’s so great that we have this opportunity, and this particular set of people doesn’t hurt either. πŸ˜‰
Thread:Week 1A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 1A Summary – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Karen,
You’re not the only conflict avoider here, to be sure. Until I read Gerzon, I figured I’d spend the rest of my time in my organization working around one or two particular directors instead of finding ways of working with them. I know now exactly how important it is that I begin the conversation of how we got to where we are in order to get back to where we need to be – working together for a common goal that I know we both have.
I think that for many of us, the concept that we can use conflict as a starting point towards making improvements and solving problems is a brand new idea. Until you begin to read how it can be done in Gerzon, I think it seems almost counterintuitive. Now it’s just common sense.
John.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth, I agree with Christine.
I attended every one of the presentations, and was thrilled to have had the opportunity to ask questions, see the candidates respond, and just generally have my voice and feelings as a community member considered in some way.
The process itself was a sign that the University was on a good path to new leadership and quickly muted the sometime cynic in me. Sometimes these selections and appointments are done behind closed doors, but the process in this case was generally open for review, which was refreshing.
John.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine, thanks!
Like I said, I really don’t have a problem with student centeredness – it definitely ‘feels right’ and I know that the students are the thread of our fabric. Becoming a student now has given me new insight into that community role as well.
I feel now like the ‘student’ in student centeredness should be redefined, somehow, or that we should all – students, staff, faculty, alumni, parents, board members, emeriti, and admins – not to mention everyone who passes the campuses on 206 or 95 or even those who just see us on a map or find us in a Google search – somehow magically be known as something like ‘students’ in our student centeredness scheme.
On one hand I know it’s a ridiculous proposition, but in my newly awakened Mediator’s mind, I feel like the place where the student ends and the administrator/whoever else begins should be the stretched joint between us, rather than the difference. How ethereal.
I guess I just so badly want the theory of leadership we’re learning in Gerzon/Glaid to apply fully to the strategic plan and vision we’ve begun to use [and it seems like a lot of us like this new direction], and I’m finding some small but clear differences in the applications and the theory.
John.
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks to all. I feel like I posted that a year ago. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1Q2 – Leadership Crisis?
Post:Re: A golden age of Leadership – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth – you’ve sparked something for me there. I think that what some are considering to be a leadership crisis may actually be an impetus for a leadership golden age sometime in the near future.
Perhaps as a backlash to some of the corrupt, money driven, hidden-personal-gains-driven leadership that is so apparent today, undiscovered great leaders who don’t even consider themselves to be leaders see the void of leadership in today’s world and see the leaders in power as so far out of touch with their own way of living that they come out in great numbers and work towards an integral vision, breaking barriers and redefining systems, bringing presence to the role of leader.
Maybe in the same way that 9/11 moved people into action that might have otherwise languished, maybe the recent examples of bad leadership will move the masses into this leadership golden age.
Maybe I’m just an optimist. No, wait, that’s not it. πŸ˜‰
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
That was fine Renee. John does a really good job in summarizing his ideas, I just like to be able to follow him with his comments because everyone just replies back to the last person and I sometimes cant tell who is responding to what. Also, Renee, your comments are very interesting as well. Both making me have a change of thought on leadership issues. Good Job Everyone. ~Kieanna
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hey John,
I see you realized it already and corrected now that I posted the correct one thinking I was being helpful. I was try to read them all first before I post but that made me loose track of what I really wanted to reply to. So, like when you are replying to e-mail and then get another from someone and think to yourself, if I read this one first I could have replied once and maybe even differently. Oh well I tried to help…glad you know either way. Take care bud.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi John and Kieanna,
I just wanted to give a little assistance to my friend John to remind him of the correct question number and what was asked. That would be: “W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Organizations can be defined as two or more people working together towards a common goal (Schermerhorn, Hunt & Osborn, 2001). Therefore, organizations can include community organizations, religious organizations, political organizations, business organizations, and perhaps families?
Please provide examples of leaders, from each of the five type of organizations I suggest. How are these leaders the same, and how do they differ?
Tim Glaid
5/18/2007”
Hope this is Ok John. Realized the number was wrong so I just copied and pasted it for you to help to keep down any confusion. Hope this helps.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W1Q2 – Leadership Crisis?
Post:Re: Leadership Crisis – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi John and Christine,
I think I agree with Christine in her agreement with you John…that is an excellent point. On the same line how many people think that the sun rose in the Kennedy family of politicians. However, as the world became more televised and technology provided more scrutiny, the country realized many years later that the Kennedy family was not perfect. If they were under the scrutiny of today’s television media I think Bill Clinton wouldn’t be the only one to be found to be immoral and who knows how many aides may have been in their offices or many other presidents before them and would have to face hearings and trials that brought shame to the country. I guess we should be grateful that we didn’t have the technology back then that we have now, knowing what we know from the history documentaries all these many years later about affairs of former presidents like the JFK. Thanks for adding this food for thought John.
I don’t think we have lost our ability to produce good leaders, but I feel in the future if we can’t change the trend in our young people to not be interested in the political process we have less replacements of the older generation of leaders. There may be a gap to fill and a need to lengthen time of officials in offices due to the lack of up and coming generations until later in their life when they have family of their own, which may make a difference but then they will be just getting started with no experience. This is the direction my mind first went. It is nice to look at the questions from different perspectives.
Kindest Regards,
Renee Lackie
Thread:W1Q2 – Leadership Crisis?
Post:Re: Leadership Crisis – LeMasney
Author:Soles, Elizabeth
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John, I couldn’t agree with you more! I think it’s difficult to say that we’re in a leadership crisis compared to the past when, as you stated, there’s more scrutiny of leaders and leadership today.
I think it can be said that Bush hasn’t turned out to be the leader that many people had hoped for, but as we’re gearing up for next year’s election I look at the vast number of candidates in the race for the presidency and I can’t help but ask– if we were in fact in a leadership crisis would we see as many candidates? Granted it’s debatable whether these individuals would be great leaders, but I tend to think that we wouldn’t have as many people running for the presidency if we were in a leadership crisis. I do believe that we’ve lacked true leadership in this country, but the fact that we have people stepping up to the challenge with a new vision and direction makes me hopeful and makes me think that we’re not in a crisis afterall. Maybe I’m too optimistic, but I’d like to hear your thoughts on that!
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: What is Leadership? Jose Reyes
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hear hear, Elizabeth.
John.
Thread:Week 1A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 1A Summary – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Terri!
John.
Thread:Week 1A Summary – Thread
Post:Re: Week 1A Summary – LeMasney
Author:Marriott, Theresa
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John, wonderful summary really enjoyed reading your thoughts on everything.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christine,
I’ve struggled a little bit about the contrasting ideas of student centeredness and the leadership principle of removing boundaries. In other words – I’ve been wondering how a leader can serve the whole better than its parts if any particular constituency is singled out as being at the center.
I’m in full support of our student centered strategic plan, and I remember when this was a much more faculty centric campus, but I am wondering how to balance out our need for ‘equality’ amongst all constituencies here and the need for us all to remember that without the students, there is no University. One might argue that you could replace “students” in that sentence with parents or staff or faculty or president or whatever, and it would still be true. Without any of those constituents, there is no University. It’s a Mono- or Multi- versity.
Is it wrong in terms of leadership to be anyone-centric? I hope not. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1BQ1 – Compare & Contrast
Post:re: W1BQ1 – Compare & Contrast Manager and Leader – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
An effective leader that I know is Chris Blanos, who is a manager in the OIT – Applications and Web services division. Chris is always looking for ways to enable users to get done what they need to get done. Chris sees everyone as a potential user of his systems. Chris is a problem solver. Chris is enthusiastic about the work that he does and the solutions he provides. Chris talks to and works with anyone, and if the job isn’t his to do, he’ll do the part of the job that he can before passing it on to someone else. Chris looks at how his job and projects and products affect everyone on and off campus, and considers everyone simultaneously a peer, a customer, and a boss. Chris is a joy to work with.
An effective Manager that I know is Ricardo Stella, who steadfastly and diligently holds to his role as associate Director of OIT – Networks in charge of security. Ricardo knows the ins and outs of security and technology more so than most anyone I can think of, but does not often work out ways in which it can or should be used in a bigger picture scenario. Ricardo works to keep the system in place running as smoothly as possible, and incorporates the needs of his director and associate VP, but requires others to go through those people to direct him. Ricardo is reliable and persistent in his goals. Ricardo worries about the jobs that he is given and lets others worry about theirs. Ricardo can be fun to work with, but is happiest when he is working out a networking problem, as opposed to a problem of almost any other type.
Both of these people are effective in getting a job done, but while the manager looks for ways to engage solutions for everyone and everything, the manager looks for ways to work out solutions within his own realm in a much more focused way.
Both of these people have to interact and work with other people, but while the manager sees all of those people as possible customers or peers and managers, the manager sees everyone in much clearer cleaner predefined roles with more easily expected outcomes.
Both of these people have a vision of what their job entails, but the leader sees the scope as infinite, and the manager sees it as within clear bounds.
The manager uses the phrase “I’m pretty sure that’s your job.” a lot, with a wink and a smile.
The leader says “What can we do to make that problem go away?” a lot.
John.
Thread:Week 1A Summary – Thread
Post:Week 1A Summary – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Attached is my Week 1A summary in Word Document format – I also included my Week 0 highlights and summary. Blackboard would not allow me to post six pages of content into a single forum post, so please excuse the break in protocol. πŸ˜‰ If anyone does not have Microsoft Office but needs to see these PowerPoints and other Office documents, you may want to consider Sun’s open source OpenOffice.org , available for free at http://openoffice.org
I’m having great fun in this course, and learning a lot, very fast. I just want to take this opportunity to thank all of you again for the revealing interactions and cooperative learning that requires the kind of discussions we’re having here.
John LeMasney
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Kieanna, you made my day. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It was awesome John. Just wanted to know what it was answering. Dont ever think you have to apologize , at least in my opinion for your thoughts. Reading not only yours but the entire class thoughts makes me think twice on my standpoint and views.
Awesome job and thanks for keeping me thinking. ~Kieanna
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Elizabeth – re your statement “I feel like I’m at the point where my boss and I may have completely different visions for the future of our department and I’m wondering how you get past something like that.”
I think that this is the heart of what Gerzon is asking you to do in the text through Mediation tools like bridging, inquiry, integral vision and systemic thinking. You have a point of view, and your boss has a point of view and they differ. But, where do they mesh? Where do you and your boss agree 100% on how something should be done? You must have some shared goals, so how can you focus on those as a starting point for mediation? Given that your boss has the leader role and it sounds as though you have a management role, is there any way that you can move towards leadership, and your boss can open themselves to allow sharing leadership?
I’m asking these same questions about other leaders here who I had given up on working with, because I figured setting up a wall allowed me to find new pathways to goals without having to fight with dissident views. Now I know that’s ridiculous, and that working towards involving everyone in shared goals is so much more important that getting my goals taken care of separately from those of others. It seems so obvious now. πŸ˜‰
But the solutions are still not obvious, and will require the steady application of these tools over time to work at making the solutions clear. It’s like an excavation site right now.
John.
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Week 1 Question 3 – not 2. Sorry again!
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Sorry, Kieanna – I was answering Tim’s W1Q2 Question in this forum, in this thread we’re in right now, on Organizational Leadership, where he asks, in part:
Please provide examples of leaders, from each of the five type of organizations I suggest. How are these leaders the same, and how do they differ?
What a great, but loaded, question to answer! It could be a full on paper in itself. I didn’t go as in depth about the differences as the similarities, but I did try to touch on it. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1Q2 – Leadership Crisis?
Post:Re: Leadership Crisis – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Chris – yes absolutely – I’m a fan of the founders, for the most part.
Today’s never ending scrutiny may be good for the sake of full disclosure, but I think that very often the reporting of the ‘extracurricular activity’ sometimes gets in the way of assessing whether a leader is a good one or not. Sometimes a paid lens is applied just to remind the public that the unpaying leader has flaws, is human, and was unlucky enough to be found out in their humanity. Some of our best leaders have been downed by the most unrelated-to-leadership scandals. Then, of course, there’s scandals like Watergate, where legitimate scrutiny was applied and bad leadership was discovered and acted upon. How many unbloggable (due to the absence of blogs) Watergates in history have gone unearthed, unannounced, with their undiscovered-and-otherwise-might-have-failed leaders retaining their shiny aura for all of history?
I’m with you. I guess I’m just saying that today’s leaders have a new level of inquiry to deal with that Washington was able to ignore, for the most part.
John.
Thread:W1Q2 – Leadership Crisis?
Post:Re: Leadership Crisis – LeMasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John,
You make an excellent point that if Washington, Jefferson, etc., existed in today’s world, their ‘extra-curricular’ activities would be front-page news. Does that make them bad leaders? I don’t think so. They are viewed today as early leaders of our country for many good and positive reasons. The reverse could also be true in that an individual today who has a ‘past’ or a black mark on his/her record might be an outstanding leader in a particular area, but because of some past poor judgment, this individual will never achieve his/her full leadership potential, and we’ll never know how great s/he could have been. Sure makes me think.
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Re: Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John, what question are you answering? I am in agreement with what you have written, but what are you directing it towards? Are you just making a general discernment as to how leaders are in different capacities? If so, I would have to agree. ~Kieanna
Thread:W1Q3 – Organizational Leadership
Post:Organizational Leadership – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
This is a tough question to answer in a single post, as I’m struggling to work out the full matrix of the response, but let’s start somewhere. πŸ˜‰
A leader from a community organization: In a neighborhood watch group, you usually have chairpersons or presidents or other officers that take a leadership role. Those leaders might offer guidance, make connections between members and the outside world, settle disputes, organize activities, and respond to community concerns about membership, fees, environmental issues, or other matters. Community Leadership could be considered an umbrella for several of these other types. Religious leadership is a kind of community leadership. Business leadership is a sort of community leadership.
A leader from a religious organization: In the Catholic Church, you have organizational hierarchies that include a pope, bishops, cardinals, priests, nuns, and even laypeople in leadership roles. These leaders might offer spiritual guidance, make connections between each other, church members, and the outside world, organize activities and guidelines to pursue faith in a constructive and consistent way, and respond to community concerns about membership, collections and distributions of support of various types, answers about time before life, life and the afterlife.
A leader from a political organization: In the democratic party, you have organizational hierarchies that might include a president, national leaders, state leaders, municipal leaders, and even smaller scale leaders. These leaders might make laws in response to concerns or needs, generate liaisons between local, state, national and international representatives,
provide leadership in chaotic situations or crises related to life itself, provide ways to make the most of the power of a collected group or groups of people up to and including the biggest group, all of us on the planet, the human collective. Political leaders might benefit from approaching politics like religious leaders who are tolerant of other religions, community leaders who are welcoming to all communities, or families who provide a safe, warm place to call home.
A leader from a business organization might be a president, a board member, a director, a manager, or a customer, if the business is listening. These leaders might provide ways for the business to improve financially, in its actions, or its plans for the future. They might provide guidance on how to use a product, how to act responsibly with a product, how to use the product to its fullest extent possibly in conjunction with products from other businesses, from the same country or another country or another 6 countries. Business leaders should consider themselves community leaders, and can sometimes create a certain level of fanatical fellowship like a religious group. Think Apple. [ http://www.wired.com/gadgets/mac/commentary/cultofmac/2002/12/56674 ]
A leader from a family might be a mother or a father or a sister or a brother or a son or a daughter or a friend or an uncle or a grandmother or… I could go on. Leadership can be about advice, providing license, sharing, distributing, and providing love, good actions, great examples, and so much more. A family leader provides spiritual advice like a church leader, and has products of sorts, like a business. Families can be led to interact with other literal families, and if led well can interact with the global family, filtering out the us and them mentality.
So much more to say. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biography – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Renee.
I’m surprised we never plumbed the depths of this topic, but we should, offline.
I ended up in computers strictly out of a love for technology, but I have had aspirations as a printmaker, sculptor, draftsman, painter, and designer. Of course, I get to do some design in my job, which is nice, and there are lots of creative opportunities at Rider if you look for them.
I visited Hungary in 1998 as a graduation present/study abroad experience with UArts. We went for three weeks in the summer. It was the first and last time I took a trip on a plane. While I was there, I visited most of the country’s fine arts institutions, a winemaker in the country by Nagy Lake, A artist’s studio in Budapest, a few tourist towns, Vienna by train, and the country in general by bus and rail car. I loved the experience, and would recommend it to anyone. The Study Abroad Class was a daily drawing class on an island in the Danube. I would stress that you should go with friends, which I was not able to do at the time.
I can’t see a jar of Nutella or instant coffee without remembering my visit. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1Q2 – Leadership Crisis?
Post:Leadership Crisis – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
In response to Tim’s clarification
I am questioning whether you think our society (has) lost its ability to produce outstanding leaders, such as were the times in Washington, Jefferson and Hamilton?
There are many who argue that generations have shifted focus towards greed and self-interest, and thus, leaders are harder to identify…
and to the class responses thus far, I’d say that the appearance of a leadership crisis is possibly unwarranted.
For instance, I think that the examples of Washington, Jefferson, and Hamilton might have had scandals and revelations if they were given the same scrutiny as politicians today that might have unseated them in their offices, such affairs, unwholesome monetary transactions, and revealed secret lifestyles. We often cast a certain light on our founding fathers that they were somehow superhuman or infallible, or without indecency, but that just likely untrue. We want the image on our greenbacks to remain unstained.
These people did not have wiretaps or global communications or 24 hour political news channels or the blogosphere to contend with, and so their possible lies of lifestyle or girlfriend promotions or whatever other unseating event may have existed, but just wasn’t unearthed. Jefferson’s sexual relations with his slaves come to mind. I just saw a documentary on Hamilton that talked about a sex-for-money scandal that was not visited in my history classes in grade school. Don’t even get me started on Andrew Jackson. πŸ˜‰
I think in a way that the level of scandal in our leadership is more a sign of closer scrutiny and a finer comb or review than of any major shift in the type of people getting into leadership roles.
As a result, I think society’s ability to produce outstanding leaders may actually have increased since anybody vying for the role of a national or international or other leader knows that they will be up against a sea of resistance if they commit to a plan that repeats the errors or fallibility or indiscretions of a Bush, or a Wolfowitz, or another leader who’s had trouble recently. Maybe Governors everywhere are obeying the speed limit and wearing seatbelts, now, after Corzine’s recent crash. Regardless, I imagine many leaders of the past escaped scrutiny that today would have filtered them out, or at least prevented a repeat of their style of leadership.
Putting on hard hat now. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:Re: W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I agree with Chris snd Cathy regarding Mort.
The strategic plan is a great guide, and an easy to read example of a leader’s intended road map. With Mort’s leadership, and the willing participation of many here, the strategic plan has incorporated many views, asked many questions, and crossed boundaries that existed between people, departments, campuses, and countries. It has given me clear examples of things to consider when planning goals, projects, organizational outreach and direction, and why I should be proud of my organization. I’m a follower, and a manager, and a leader at Rider. This document, which I would call a written version of our integral vision, help me to be all three successfully here and in relations outside of Rider. It looks at the long term future, and has an outlook that is challenging, realistic, and exciting. These are all tools of Mediation, and all tools I think are in keeping with good leadership.
If leadership is any predictor of success, I’m very excited for Rider’s future. πŸ˜‰ I’m quite biased, however.
John.
Thread:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined
Post:W1Q1 – Leadership Defined – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Leadership is seeing and acting upon the whole picture. It’s working to improve the whole by connecting and meshing all of its parts. It is about removing and going across boundaries in order to make those boundaries less prominent or insignificant. Leadership is transforming us and them into we. Leadership, first, does no harm. Leadership – good leadership – gets people to follow by example, common sense, and collaborative effort. Leadership asks the questions that get to the heart of a matter and quietly listens to the answers. Leadership is about betterment. Leadership is a collective view and an amplified voice that people don’t want to unplug when it represents them. Leadership assumes responsibility along with accolades. Leadership is not about winning.
Examples of leadership for me are Steve Jobs of Apple, Inc., who seems to find the products that people really want, makes them accessible to as many people as possible through simple interfaces and lower prices, works to make his company environmentally responsible [ http://www.apple.com/hotnews/agreenerapple/ ] and has slowly and gradually rebuilt a failing company into a company that other leading companies want to be.
Gandhi was a leader who saw the world as being without fences. He pursued peace through peaceful means. He saw unreasonable behavior in his fellow humans and gave examples of other ways to act instead. He quietly showed the ridiculousness of taxation on salt by collecting and drying sea salt, for example.
Al Gore is pursuing the global climate crisis, and is doing so by seeing the world as equally responsible in all of it’s parts. He is transforming the them and us into we. He experienced a public failure and went on to pursue other significant goals, instead of lying down and fading away. I see Gore as a leader.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biography – LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Monday, May 21, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi John,
Wow I didn’t realize you were so experienced in Fine Art. Where did you go in Europe? That must have been nice. Glad you ended up at Rider after you travels to Europe. It was nice to read you bio…I learned much I didn’t know. Here I thought you were more the techie guy with some graphic art background, too. Little did I know. Sounds very interesting all though. TTYL.
Sincerely,
Renee
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: What is Leadership? Jose Reyes
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Jose,
Just for the record – Corzine requested and paid a ticket for failure to restrain.
A gesture of appearances, to be sure, but he was ticketed.
j.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership reply Marriott Jose Reyes
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Jose,
I’m excited by your statement here, because it reminds me that one of the greatest college experiences is meeting people with radically different ideas than your own. When everyone thinks the same way – it’s groupthink, and no one gains anything.
I don’t share your view on destiny, God, fraternal benefits, leadership entitlement, or money as license, but I wholly respect your right to feel as you do and to argue those points.
It’s a great gift that you and I can be together in this class and get a chance to converse about topics like this, since there is probably so very little chance that we’d have the opportunity elsewhere.
Your viewpoints are so very different than mine. (!) In this setting, we both get the license and ability to express ourselves, which is just absolutely fantastic. It’s also a reminder that these same differences occur in every organization everywhere, and leaders have to learn to incorporate differing points of view or suffer the consequences of resistance to intolerance.
It also seems to me to be a great opportunity for both of us to exercise leadership skills in conflict resolution. We feel differently, but we have to work together, so how do we do it? Exactly as we are. πŸ˜‰
I appreciate your comment, and I love that we have different points of view, since that is a great way for both of us to open our minds and grow.
John.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership is like Water – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Saturday, May 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’ve been thinking about metaphors for leadership lately, and I keep coming back to leadership being like water.
Leadership is fluid. It can seep into things and take many shapes, like a bag or a bucket or a sponge or a pile of dirt, and is often defined by the organization that holds it.
Turnkey businesses are sort of like instant tea mix – just add water, but don’t expect the full flavor or quality of slow brewed tea. πŸ˜‰
Water can be gaseous, liquid, or solid. Leadership can pressurize an organization like steam in a chamber, freeze the growth of an organization like a lake in winter, or make an organization flow through most any obstacle.
Water is the ultimate solvent. Given enough time, it can eat through anything. Look at the Grand Canyon, and think “Leadership is like that.”
Water can conduct electricity better than most materials. Good leadership can electrify an organization.
Leadership can be shared. Leadership can help build a community, like rivers often allowed cities and communities to thrive. The Delaware River to Philadelphia, or the Danube to Vienna, Budapest, and other european city centers.
Leadership is vital to the life of an organization or goal. Without good leadership, a goal will wilt, fade away, and die.
Leadership out of control, or performed without real planning, can kill many people, suddenly, like a tsunami or a flood.
Leadership can inspire and soothe people like the ocean or a lake can calm and reassure.
Water can be shallow or deep – when it’s very clean you can see all of what’s there. When it’s dirty, you can’t see what’s at the bottom of it. Wholesome leadership should be transparent too.
Stagnant leadership can be hard to get through, becoming like a swampy mess, with mosquitoes, disease, and that dank moldy dead smell.
Leadership can be secretly poisonous, like lead laden water, being consumed without the poison being detected, and slowly hurting that which drinks of it.
I like the metaphor a lot, and I appreciated the chance to share it.
John LeMasney
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:Re: The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:Schwaikert, Christie
Date:Saturday, May 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
How about those PERKS!?!?!?
Check out why else Google scored #1 on Fortune’s list.
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/bestcompanies/2007/snapshots/1.html
I currently work for the company who is number five on that list. A large portion of the way this list is established is based on individual employee surveys. The questions we had to answer were relative to how empowered we felt to effect change when necessary and how many growth opportunities did we experience.
CMS
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:Re: The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:Schwaikert, Christie
Date:Saturday, May 19, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
To me, social responsibility is a very important attribute for large corporations. Although Wall Street analysts may deem them unnecessary, those values become an important factor when I make a decision on where to spend my money or my time. I support companies that mirror my priorities and value system.
This article demonstrated that Google has a global vision for its products, consumers and employees. It understands that a shared fate style will only yield higher successes. Their corporate culture will attract leaders who buy into that vision and can see themselves succeeding in that type of environment. I firmly believe that the article John provided to us, highlights why Google was #1 on Fortune’s 2007 Top 100 Companies to work for.
If only they were in NJ, I think I would do my best to get recruited by them.
CMS
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:The relationship of Leadership and Fellowship.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, May 18, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Jose,
I think I can give you some examples in my own organization. There are some managers [in title] who show great leadership skills in the way that they execute and inform the people they are following, meaning other leaders in the hierarchy. These managers might show leadership skills when they act upon (follow) the advice of an angry customer who wants the system to change to serve customers better and gives some timely suggestions. They might show leadership skills when they act in the best interest of the entire organization and its relation to the outside world, following the guidelines of a strategic plan that they had no direct part in writing, but see the wisdom of, and follow to the letter in the name of leadership. I think that so much in leadership is about following, about giving way, about caving in the best interests of the whole.
Oxymoronic, possibly, but the two terms feed each others’ meaning, to be sure. πŸ˜‰
This has been fun – looking forward to the next group of discussions.
Thanks to everyone in the class for a great ‘first week’!
John LeMasney
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: George Bush
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, May 18, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Shaun, I’m with you on people having set beliefs.
I feel a little cautious talking about Bush here, since I have such emotional personal feelings about the situation we’re in as a country, but considering that he’s considered the ‘leader of the free world’ and this is a course on Leadership, I guess he was going to come up sooner or later, and our various opinions would become part of the discussion. Where else is the discussion more appropriate, if not here? πŸ˜‰
Usually, sticking to the facts is a safe way to conduct a debate, but even sticking to facts about his leadership could create strong dividing lines. One’s feelings about politics or spirituality are one of those topics that can so quickly poison a good discussion, and I’m glad that hasn’t happened here.
John.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership reply Marriott Jose Reyes
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Friday, May 18, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Jose, you say:
“‘Leaders and born and not made’ is one of my favorite quotes is the very essence of how leaders come about.”
Who is this quote from?
My initial reaction to this is that if you believe that leaders are born and not made, why would you or anyone else be in a program to pursue leadership skills? If it’s a birthright, and leaders ‘are not made’ why would anyone born out of the specialized caste bother to try to pursue the unobtainable? πŸ˜‰
I think it’s a viable theory, but if it’s true, then we’re all looking for something that we had, or not, the day we were born. I didn’t have it. 😦
I like your bluntness. On Bush as a leader, I think he’s a very effective leader of the demagogue type, as he got basically every one of his original directives carried out by force, fear, or coercion. I think he’s a failure on a new scale in terms of leader as mediator. He’s a commander guy, and his mission was accomplished, and he seems to care very little about what his constituents, including our forces abroad, actually need, want, or care about. Whether we want it to be true or not, America is now seen by the world as an extension of the Bush mindset. As you say: a “solid representation of what of what (we are) about”.
Without the title of president, I agree with you, it’s likely he wouldn’t be followed, but there are still lots of people following his rule to the letter right now – some by choice, some by force – is it just due to his title? I think it has to do with his tactics, too.
John.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Mediator qualities: character – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Lauren,
Character is a great word for it. I could see character as a result of education and environment, too, which I’m on a little kick about now. πŸ˜‰
I’m a big fan of integrity too.
John.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership and Prejudice.
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
When you say “I don’t believe that leaders are born just as I don’t believe people are born being prejudiced” I couldn’t agree more. So many things about our character and skills are about the choices we make in response to environment and education. Great analogy there, IMO.
John LeMasney.
Thread:Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Post:Re: Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Kieanna,
All I kept thinking was “Wow – What if Dr. Glaid is taking points off my posts every time I call him Tim?”
I worked with a faculty member who once quietly told me that the next time I called him “Doctor” he’d absolutely have to throw me out a window. I learned his first name quickly.
Some like pot-ay-to, some like pot-hawt-o. Some really, really don’t like doctor.
πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biographies – Thread
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Again, welcome, Renee!
BTW – if you are interested in a free, easy to maintain solution for online photo galleries, I have some suggestions. My personal favorite at the moment is called Singapore, an open source solution that we use for lots of Rider projects, including our Commencement galleries at http://media.rider.edu/gallery/. It’s a fantastic project with all of the benefits of being open source, including being free of charge. You will need a server running PHP, but little else in terms of requirements. If you want to know more, let’s talk about it offline.
http://sourceforge.net/projects/singapore/
John LeMasney
Thread:Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Post:Re: Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Welcome, Renee!
We’re a fine bunch here – lots of nice, friendly leaders-in-the-making. If there’s anything I can do to help you get back up to speed, just say the word. I spent some time with Robert today at Faculty Development Day – it was a lot of fun.
There are quite a few Rider folks here, and it’s a lot of fun to get to know them in this setting. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Post:Re: Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Author:Lackie, Cynthia
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi John,
It is nice to see you here and be able to read everyone’s posts. I see there are several Rider folks here that I know including you, of course.
Thanks for any assistance you gave in OIT to finally get my EasyPass and Blackboard log-in finally fixed so I could join the class discussions.
Sincerely,
Renee Lackie
Thread:Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Post:Re: Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Author:Childs, Kieanna
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Wow John:
I was thinking the same thing! I did not want to not call Tim, Dr. Glaid, since when I did not address a faculty member as such they would quickly advise me of how hard he/she worked for their degree. Thanks for asking that question John and thanks for replying Tim. ~Kieanna
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership without the title – LeMasney
Author:Adams, Lauren
Date:Thursday, May 17, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John, I agree with your thoughts on following someone who you view as a leader in the absence of a title and you indicate it’s hard to put a finger on why you choose to view that person as a leader. I agree it’s not necessarily charisma although at first one may be attracted to that person based on personality. To me this elusive quality is defined as character.
I too am a mediator helping guide my kids to make the best most ethical decisions and I often model my behavior after people I have come to admire to have good character and I tend to associate with other parents who live their lives with integrity.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leaders outside of the management ranks – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Cathy – I agree. Go, R.J.!
On Tim’s question of leadership being bred or learned, I’m definitely on the learning side of the fence. If we make a distinction between learning and experience/environment, I think that experience shapes us in ways that we don’t fully understand, sometimes ever, sometimes until years pass. We might have a revelation like “Oh yeah – if I hadn’t had that job picking up trash, I might have never gotten an appreciation for not littering – I’d probably be a slob!”
To theorize about leadership as a result of learning and experience and environment more so than heredity or breeding [though it likely has its part, such as being born into a hard economic time might give you insights into money or survival related leadership issues], and then to think about how so many people cross pollinate and take part in so many influential interactions, decisions, and introductions during their college years, it’s no wonder that the leaders emerge at places like the one you, and I, and so many in this class, work at.
But, I’m sure there are great leaders who vehemently opposed and ignored and sort of formal schooling, but there are other collegiate experiences that might have shaped those leaders in similar ways.
I know that I’d personally be a lot different person if I had followed my own advice to skip college and commit to my “good paying” but thoroughly soulless manual labor job. I had it all worked out when I was 18. πŸ˜‰ Many thank yous go to my mother, who convinced me to just try college for a year. I was hooked my first semester. Mom is a mediator.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leaders outside of the management ranks – lemasney
Author:Carter-Romero, Cathy
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John,
I think you’re right, looking at our students is a great way to see that leadership is both learned and something you’re born with. Those of us who work in education get to see first hand the growth of leaders. It’s amazing to watch the transformation that happens in the four years they are here. In particular, I can think of several basketball players (I happen to be a fanatical fan of Rider Basketball!) who grew into effective leaders during their Rider careers. It’s easy to see leadership in athletics. Afterall, we’re viewing it as spectators and the results are tangible.
One player in particular comes to mind. R.J. Wicks evolved into the leader of a very special team in 2002. R.J. worked harder than anyone on the team. He dove for the ball and came back from injuries. He expected a lot of himself and of others. He motivated others to rise to his level. And while he played alongside the #2 all time scoring leader at Rider, his teammates relied on R.J. to show them the way.
Today, R.J. has a great job, a wife and is a volunteer in his community. He graduated on time, completed his masters and left a lasting impression on all who knew him at Rider.
While you have to believe R.J. came to Rider with some inate qualities of an effective leader, I believe he learned a lot while he was here. It was, and continues to be, an evolutionary process.
-CCR
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leaders outside of the management ranks – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I have seen leadership skills in some of my own student workers that would seem to eclipse the leadership skills of some of our top titled leaders elsewhere. Leadership isn’t limited to managers in an organization, but typically, the managership or other authoritative title gives certain license that the student workers who show great leadership skills couldn’t act with, if for no other reason than that they couldn’t ‘sign off on it’ or otherwise approve the changes that they might suggest. That’s why it’s so important for those in the titled role have to listen and dialogue with the ones without the titles.
To give you a specific example of leadership in one of our student workers, I’ll tell you about one great project that was taken on. A student who worked for me once proposed and executed a flash application to allow other students to move furniture and other objects around in a virtual dorm room. His application was one of the most popular student destinations on the Rider web site for the 4 or 5 years that it was available. He discovered a problem, envisioned a solution, and used the tools he had available to him to make things better and easier. He met a need that others knew about, but that the others didn’t take the extra leadership-driven step to do something about. He employed inquiry, systems thinking, presence, and other Mediator tools in researching and resolving the problem, and he did it well outside of the typical scope of a student worker. He also had to propose and argue for the ability to put it up, despite the obviousness of its need which was only apparent to some of us after the feedback started coming in.
We’ve been lucky enough to have a handful of leaders as student workers, and many more who were what Gerzon would call Managers. No demagogues stayed on for more than a semester. πŸ˜‰
Thread:Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Post:Re: Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John and class,
I appreciate your inquiry, and yes, I do prefer Tim. As graduate students, I view us as a group of co-learners, who have gathered together to explore the nature of leadership and motivation. I will do my best to facilitate and orchestrate a robust classroom, full of discussion and debate.
All the best,
Tim Glaid
5/16/2007
—- forwarded
Dr. Glaid, Tim, Professor, Timothy,
I have addressed you in a couple of different ways on the forums, but have recently settled on Tim – do you have a preference for how you’d like to be addressed? You sign your messages as Tim Glaid, but I think it might be presumptuous to assume you’d prefer to be called Tim or referred to in a similarly casual way.
Just wondering, and figured others might too. I’m loving this format!
John LeMasney.
Thread:Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Post:Respectful Addressing – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Dr. Glaid, Tim, Professor, Timothy,
I have addressed you in a couple of different ways on the forums, but have recently settled on Tim – do you have a preference for how you’d like to be addressed? You sign your messages as Tim Glaid, but I think it might be presumptuous to assume you’d prefer to be called Tim or referred to in a similarly casual way.
Just wondering, and figured others might too. I’m loving this format!
John LeMasney.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biographies – Adams
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Lauren. I had no idea you were bilingual. I knew you spoke in a couple of technology based languages fluently, though. πŸ˜‰
Great to be in class with you!
John LeMasney.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership without the title – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I’m thinking that in most cases where I felt like following the lead of someone who wasn’t in a title position of leadership or authority, it wasn’t so much charisma or personality, per se, that made me want to follow them. I’m trying to define what exactly it was, but it’s elusive. I know that when I see someone providing a good example as a father, I pay close attention and regard them as a sort of leader to be followed – I see their results – a well behaved, thoughtful, loving child – and I want them to be my same results – this parent and I have a common goal, and I see through their example a way to achieve it, so I immediately fall into line. The parent isn’t necessarily winning me over with charisma or personality, though one could argue their personality led to their successful parenting to some degree. The exemplar parent doesn’t have a title per se, and has no authority over me, nor charisma, and I doubt they were born with the innate sense of fatherhood. Chances are they had good leaders and exemplars, and committed to them, and I have the luck of getting them as an exemplar and pass on that baton of leadership, hopefully. Some parents are more like managers, and some more like demagogues. My example is father as mediator, keeping the peace of his child. Anywhere I say father, you might replace it with mother or uncle or pet owner, as appropriate. πŸ˜‰
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:Re: The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:Marriott, Theresa
Date:Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John, great article thanks for sharing.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:History Books and the Bush legacy – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think that over time Bush’s leadership will be perceived differently than it is now, because at some future date we will have a lot more information, outcomes, and ‘results’ of his leadership. I don’t think that anyone who has had the impact on the world that Bush has had is accurately depicted at the time of his reign. I’m thinking that Hitler, Siddhartha, Jesus Christ, Washington, Napoleon, and other history changing leaders were likely all seen differently in their circa – seen out of context with their long standing impacts – because those impacts weren’t yet able to be analyzed over time, clarified with facts, and plainly available for years of argument and study. I don’t think Bush will fare well in history books ten years from now, but since I don’t have all the data that those people will have ten years from now, I can only go on the part of Bush’s legacy that I can see right now. Has there ever been a President with negative approval ratings before? Maybe they’ll find out that there were massive underground bunkers absolutely packed with nuclear WMDs all over Iraq five years from now, and Bush will be seen in the historical rear view mirror with an aura of heroism, but honestly, I doubt that Bush’s legacy will improve history’s view of his leadership. I apologize for the political overtones of my argument, but I wanted to try to address Tim’s question.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Litmus test
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Cathy,
I think that Gerzon would probably drop him in the Demagogue exemplar list – leader by force, but not by popular choice. In fact, I think he does it once or twice without actually naming Bush.
John.
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:Re: The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It’s hard to imagine what the landscape of technology would look like without Google’s leadership and influence. [shudder] πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Text availability
Post:Re: Text availability
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Terri – I got them all now, but Amazon was my next stop. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:Re: The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:Carter-Romero, Cathy
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think this is a great example John…
Corporations aspiring for success and to be leaders in their field could learn a lot from the leadership of Google. How easy it must be to lead when everyone wants to follow!
Thread:Text availability
Post:Re: Text availability
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
Got the rest of the books today at the bookstore – plenty to go around. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: What is Leadership?
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
The large picture aspect of what Marybeth is saying really appeals to me as a cornerstone of the “leadership” we’re examining here. I think when Tim introduced the difference between Manager and Leader, he’s touching on this too. Managers are, almost by definition, focused, tunnel visioned, and dedicated to that which is within their ‘bounds’ to manage. Leaders are always looking at Marybeth’s larger picture. I’m a manager by title, but I hope that I can begin to really implement what I’m learning here about leadership, which is that I’m not just affecting the office of instructional technology with my management, I’m potentially affecting the university, the city, the community, the country, the world by the way that I do my part in working with people outside of the bounds of this office of instructional technology, or this university, or this state, etc. Interfacing seems to be key.
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:Re: The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Particularly apt is number 8 on the list:
“The need for information crosses all borders.
Though Google is headquartered in California, our mission is to facilitate access to information for the entire world, so we have offices around the globe. To that end we maintain dozens of Internet domains and serve more than half of our results to users living outside the United States. Google search results can be restricted to pages written in more than 35 languages according to a user’s preference. We also offer a translation feature to make content available to users regardless of their native tongue and for those who prefer not to search in English, Google’s interface can be customized into more than 100 languages. To accelerate the addition of new languages, Google offers volunteers the opportunity to help in the translation through an automated tool available on the Google.com website. This process has greatly improved both the variety and quality of service we’re able to offer users in even the most far flung corners of the globe. ”
Thread:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Post:The corporation as leader – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I came across an interesting article this morning that talked about Google’s “10 commandments” – 10 philosophical directives that direct the company’s actions. It can be found at
http://www.google.com/corporate/today.html
and I thought that in all of our discussions, we’ve been talking about the individual as leader, but I think this is a great example of a brand, a company that is doing a lot to show leadership qualities on a wide scope scale, paying attention to humanity issues, global economy, working for the greater good, etc. This is an interesting sort of mission statement for a company that does so much more than just provide a way to find things on the internet. They, as a group, are showing the best of the leadership qualities that we’re talking about, I think. This might also open discussion about companies acting as Demagogue, or as Managers, rather than Mediators. Microsoft comes to mind as Demagogue, where they use their market dominance to threaten smaller companies or erase them. I could see some company that stays firmly within the bounds of its industry being considered a Manager – like a design company that only works in print, and are in denial about their future. Google is definitely using Mediator tactics. They are reaching out into lots of markets and bringing people together with their market dominance.
Thread:Biography – Schwaikert
Post:Re: Biography – Schwaikert
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christie,
Thanks very much! I’m sure I’ll see you there. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Introduction
Post:Re: Introduction
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Great to see you here, Cathy!
Thread:Biography – Schwaikert
Post:Re: Biography – Schwaikert
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Christie,
Your store, in particular, absolutely rocks.
Thanks so much for doing your part – I lost about 115 lbs over the last year in a nutritional overhaul, and your store is one of the handful of local markets I can go and feel fairly certain that what I’m buying and eating is the right thing. Viva la WholeFoods Princeton.
John LeMasney.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Macauley
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Great video, Robert!
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biography – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Tim,
I certainly will – I still visit my parents in Bensalem about once a week.
I’m loving the class already!
John LeMasney.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Leaders vs. Managers – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
It’s an interesting question – I keep feeling like we should be making distinctions between leaders and good leaders, and now, managers and good managers. I’m using the term good in a moral altruistic sense, not as in effective – I think you can be effective [e.g. Demagogues can get results] without being a good leader. I think when we are making these definitions the “good” prefix is assumed unless otherwise noted.
I think that Leaders and Managers are the same in that they are both working towards something – hopefully the same thing – I guess I believe that Leaders are in more of a thinking and planning role with supporting actions, and Managers are in more of a maintenance role. I’m reading the Manager face of leadership section of Gerzon tonight, so I may be eating my words tomorrow. I think a Manager can be a Leader, but I think it’s harder for a Leader to be a Manager. I don’t feel that they are interchangable, to be sure.
It seems hierarchically set to me that a Leader sets the pace, and the Manager keeps the pace. Followers just follow. πŸ˜‰ I am a leader in some situations and a manager under other leaders in other situations in the same organization. Being a leader in a management role might actually be counterproductive or insubordinate. If I suggest a new direction in direct opposition to a leader’s direction, even though it might be the best way in my own opinion, I have to find a way to introduce the idea without it being a derailing maneuver. Managing as part of another’s leadership might be construed as practicing a respect for leadership, or doing service to leadership, but I don’t know that it’s leadership in and of itself.
Thread:Text availability
Post:Re: Text availability
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Thanks, Robert!
John.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Defining Leadership – lemasney
Author:De Frehn, Christine
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Cathy,
You make an excellent point that successful leaders lead by example. I think that employees are so much more motivated and will go the extra mile for the organization when the leader has set the example of going the extra mile, or pitching in to get the job done, and arriving on time for work, not leaving early, etc.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Defining Leadership – lemasney
Author:Carter-Romero, Cathy
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John,
I agree with much of what you have to say. I believe that leadership comes in many forms – some related to title, others not.
I think leadership is much like respect. It’s something that is earned. A leader who is strictly a figurehead – a painting on a wall or a signature on a check – must rely on the leadership abilities of those reporting to him/her.
Some people set out to be leaders, others are accidental leaders. One of the best examples of that, I believe, is Lance Armstrong. All he ever planned to do was win bike races. But a cancer diagnosis, survival, and winning a historic number of ultimate bike race titles put him in a position to be a leader. It was something he could have shied away from, but he didn’t. He rose to the challenge and is rallying those of us who are cancer survivors – inspiring an entire generation to be leaders in their communities and to challenge conventional wisdom about survivorship. He’s gone from the guy selling the yellow bands to a respected activist lobbying the highest levels of goverment for investment in change.
As I mentioned in my bio, I’ve seen a lot of change in leadership positions in my career here at Rider. Those who have been most successful lead by example. If you want your staff to work harder and put in more hours, you have to be willing to do the same. If you want your employees to think about their jobs creatively, you have demonstrate “thinking outside the box.”
As for titles, I think they are labels only. A clear way to identify heirarchy. But to be a leader requires much more…
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biography – LeMasney
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John,
Thank you for the biography, and it’s great to get to know you.
The School Superintendent in my local township (Upper St. Clair … 10 miles south of Pittsburgh) left in January to become the Superintendent of the Bethsalem School District. If you ever get an opportunity to meet Dr. Jim Lombardo, tell him I said hello. We used to ride our motorcycles together.
All the best in the class.
Tim Glaid
5/14/2007
—— forwarded
Biography – John LeMasney – lemasney@rider.eduhttp://www.lemasney.com
Welcome to everyone in the online course, I’m looking forward to working with you all. Here’s an extended biography that is probably closer to what Dr. Glade was looking for.
I am driven by a few things. I appreciate and seek out creativity, innovation, and openness. I am a technologist, artist, designer, manager, husband and father.
I was born and raised in Bensalem, just outside of Philadelphia, PA. I lived in a few places in Pennsylvania until just recently, when I became a New Jersey resident.
In 1995, I received an Associate degree in Fine Arts from Bucks County Community College, where I studied under Catherine Jansen, Marlene Miller, Charlotte Schatz, Alan Goldstein, Christopher Bursk, and John Matthews, amongst many other fine faculty. I then went to University of the Arts in Philadelphia, where I got a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture in 1998 under Barry Parker. I was able to travel to Europe over the summer, and upon my return I got a job as an instructional technologist at Rider University. I am now pursuing a Master of Arts in Leadership with an emphasis in Information Technology at Rider.
I have been here ever since, and I have built up the Center for Innovative Instruction, the Office of Instructional Technology, and the faculty training and development programs with a lot of help from good people here.
I wife Dawn and I have a beautiful 2 year old named Jack. We are constantly reminded and amazed at how blessed we are in life.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Reply LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Terri, I agree. I mean I think that while I likely had the opportunity to show better leadership qualities in those positions, I probably missed those opportunities. For instance, when I was a groundskeeper, I used to upset some of my co workers by going above and beyond in my duties – things like sweeping up the asphalt out by the main road or making sure that the street signs were perfectly perpendicular to the ground – and I’d get a little bit of ridicule from my peers because it put a lens on the fact that there were just doing what was asked and not a drop more. I even got taken aside by the superintendent and asked quietly to ‘stop working so hard’ which at first surprised me. After time, I realized it was a disease of that particular work environment. Looking back, It’s clear that I had a bad example in the super, and inherited a lack of motivation and morale from my peers. I might have used that conflict to make a leadership opportunity out of the situation, but I didn’t know that anyone could be a leader at the time. Instead, I kept my head low, slowed down my work, and apologized for going the extra mile. Some lessons are priceless, and I learned to never accept that I should do less just so that others don’t need to. Some of my best teachers in leadership were the worst leaders, to be sure. πŸ˜‰
Thread:Text availability
Post:Text availability
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I got the Gerzon text last week at the Rider Bookstore, but the others weren’t available – did anyone see/get the other books at the Rider bookstore yet?
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Re: Leadership reply Marriott
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I think Terri’s use of ‘service’ to begin to describe leadership is key – so often, I think good leaders are aware and open to being led to some degree by their constituents and having the good leadership sense to balance it with practicality, big picture benefits for all, and avoiding being led by the dollar or other poisonous influences.
When she says a leader might not always lead, it’s key – a good leader follows a lot of leading influences themselves.
Thread:What is Leadership?
Post:Defining Leadership – lemasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I would personally define leadership as the act of one moving many towards a defined goal. As Gerzon tells us early on in the text, there are good ways to do it [Mediator] and horrible ways to do it [Demagogue].
A think that leadership has very little to do with title. Those without a directorship or presidency or chair position are often called upon to lead in smaller but still significant ways, and given an understanding of leadership, they can succeed.
You might be a leader due to your sense of personal responsibility in the global pollution problem.
You might be a leader in the way that you move your peers to some common team goal.
I have found that many exert their leadership skills much more boldly and powerfully when they don’t have the title, since getting the title can sometimes lead to more cautious leadership styles.
I like to think that someone in a fast food front end or a groundskeeper can be a leader, and that it can be the motivation to move up and out of that position. I like to think that I carried a sense of leadership when I had those positions, but now I’m not so sure. I could have done more to motivate my peers.
When Tim suggests the litmus test of removal of title, I think it’s quite accurate. If you can lead without the title, you’re the real leader.
Thread:Happy Mother’s Day
Post:Re: Happy Mother’s Day
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I second that – where would we be without mothers? πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Biography – LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Biography – John LeMasney – lemasney@rider.eduhttp://www.lemasney.com
Welcome to everyone in the online course, I’m looking forward to working with you all. Here’s an extended biography that is probably closer to what Dr. Glade was looking for.
I am driven by a few things. I appreciate and seek out creativity, innovation, and openness. I am a technologist, artist, designer, manager, husband and father.
I was born and raised in Bensalem, just outside of Philadelphia, PA. I lived in a few places in Pennsylvania until just recently, when I became a New Jersey resident.
In 1995, I received an Associate degree in Fine Arts from Bucks County Community College, where I studied under Catherine Jansen, Marlene Miller, Charlotte Schatz, Alan Goldstein, Christopher Bursk, and John Matthews, amongst many other fine faculty. I then went to University of the Arts in Philadelphia, where I got a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture in 1998 under Barry Parker. I was able to travel to Europe over the summer, and upon my return I got a job as an instructional technologist at Rider University. I am now pursuing a Master of Arts in Leadership with an emphasis in Information Technology at Rider.
I have been here ever since, and I have built up the Center for Innovative Instruction, the Office of Instructional Technology, and the faculty training and development programs with a lot of help from good people here.
I wife Dawn and I have a beautiful 2 year old named Jack. We are constantly reminded and amazed at how blessed we are in life.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Biographies – PONE
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Welcome, Dave,
23 was a great year. πŸ˜‰
33 has it’s charms too.
John.
Thread:Hi from Cathy Carter-Romero
Post:Re: Hi from Cathy Carter-Romero
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
I had no idea you were so close to your Bachelor’s – congratulations!
John.
Thread:Intro of Shaun Clarida
Post:Re: Intro of Shaun Clarida
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Shaun,
Nice to meet you! You’re going to do fine.
John.
Thread:Biographies – Thread
Post:Re: Nanni
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Monday, May 14, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Karen
It’s my first online course ever too. We’re gonna be just fine. πŸ˜‰
John.
Thread:Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Post:Re: Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Author:Glaid, Timothy
Date:Thursday, May 10, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
John,
It is nice to “meet”, and I thank you for joining the LEAD/530 Leading and Motivating course. I also thank you for your photo.
I look forward to you sharing your insights and perspectives in the class.
Enjoy the learning.
Tim Glaid
5/10/2007
—— forwarded
Hi, everyone,
I’m John LeMasney. This is my first class at Rider University, and first online class anywhere, but I’ve worked here since 1998. I know some of you – I attached a picture in case you know my face, but not my name. I got my Bachelor of Fine Arts from University of the Arts in Philadelphia, and I’m excited to finally be pursuing my MA here.
This is a little bit strange for me, because I manage the Blackboard system, and I’m in it all the time, but this is my first opportunity to use it as an end user.
I’ve heard great things about Dr. Glaid, and I’m looking forward to learning from him, and all of you, over the next 6 weeks. πŸ˜‰
Thread:Hi
Post:Re: Hi
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, Terri – great to see you here!
j.
Thread:Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Post:Hi, I’m John LeMasney
Author:LeMasney, John
Date:Wednesday, May 9, 2007
Status:PUBLISHED
Overall rating: Not rated
Hi, everyone,
I’m John LeMasney. This is my first class at Rider University, and first online class anywhere, but I’ve worked here since 1998. I know some of you – I attached a picture in case you know my face, but not my name. I got my Bachelor of Fine Arts from University of the Arts in Philadelphia, and I’m excited to finally be pursuing my MA here.
This is a little bit strange for me, because I manage the Blackboard system, and I’m in it all the time, but this is my first opportunity to use it as an end user.
I’ve heard great things about Dr. Glaid, and I’m looking forward to learning from him, and all of you, over the next 6 weeks. πŸ˜‰

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